Inaugural Oxford Business Forum Africa focuses on the theme ‘Unreasonable Africa’

With a burgeoning youth population, stabilising political landscape, and an abundance of natural resources, Africa is often hailed as the next global economic powerhouse.

The Oxford Business Forum Africa (http://www.Oxfordbfa.com) will explore the reality of business in Africa and the true opportunities and challenges to starting, consolidating, and scaling businesses there. By learning directly from leading business people working in Africa, the Forum focuses on understanding the interconnected nature of business, the diversity of markets and consumers in African countries, and the innovative approaches business adopt to maximise their impact.

The theme ‘Unreasonable Africa’ celebrates individuals who are finding solutions and opportunities beyond the expected, who are challenging the status quo, and whose bold visions and decisions have led to exceptional successes.

Key sessions of the Forum will be livestreamed and people all over the world can participate in the discussions by submitting questions to twitter; more information is available here: http://www.APO.af/lIZkl0.

Hosted jointly by Saïd Business School (http://www.SBS.ox.ac.uk), Oxford University, and the Oxford Business Network for Africa, led by current Oxford MBA students, the Forum will convene over 30 speakers from pioneering start-ups, leading financial institutions and corporate companies, NGOs, and government.

Speakers include:

  • Trevor Manuel, Former Finance Minister of South Africa
  • Dolika Banda, Independent Consultant, and former Managing Director of the CDC Group
  • Katlego Maphai, Managing Director of Yoco
  • Tara Fela-Durotoye, Founder and CEO of House of Tara
  • Ladi Delano, Founder of Grace Lakes Partners
  • Colin Coleman, Managing Director of Goldman Sachs
  • Doug de Villiers, CEO of Interbrand Africa
  • Nonhlanhla Masina, Co-Founder of African School for Excellence
  • Akinwole Omoboriowo, CEO of Genesis Electricity
  • Joshua Rugema, Managing Director of H20 Venture Partners

The programme and full list of speaker is available here: (http://www.Oxfordbfa.com).

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Said Business School – University of Oxford.

For further information, please contact the press office:
Kate Richards, Press Officer,
Tel: +441865 288879
Email: kate.richards@sbs.ox.ac.uk

About Saïd Business School
Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford (http://www.SBS.ox.ac.uk) blends the best of new and old. We are a vibrant and innovative business school, but yet deeply embedded in an 800 year old world-class university. We create programmes and ideas that have global impact. We educate people for successful business careers, and as a community seek to tackle world-scale problems. We deliver cutting-edge programmes and ground-breaking research that transform individuals, organisations, business practice, and society. We seek to be a world-class business school community, embedded in a world-class University, tackling world-scale problems.

Source:: Inaugural Oxford Business Forum Africa focuses on the theme ‘Unreasonable Africa’

Categories: AFRICA

On Time International expands operations in Africa to simplify access to public services for citizens

On Time International (www.OnTimeGroup.com) has just announced upcoming tour in West Africa in order to present the company’s expertise in managing administrative services on behalf of public authorities. Thanks to substantial experience acquired in the United Arab Emirates, the company wants to deploy its service offering on the African continent. As part of this effort, states, regional authorities or investment agencies should be proposed adapted tools to ease delivery of public services to individuals and companies. On Time International’s CEO Alpha Diallo will therefore visit from 7 to 13 March 2016 several countries where public administration modernization programs were recently launched – such as Ghana, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Republic of Guinea and Ivory Coast.

Optimizing the management of civil servants and improving their efficiency, state reform programs, initiatives to bring civil servants closer to citizens: “several ongoing reforms and projects in West Africa allow us to believe that public authorities are eager to discover – and even ask for – solutions provided by the private sector”, explained Alpha Diallo. He also added that On Time International is “able to offer technical support to accelerate and simplify a number of activities, such as visa and passport requests, birth certificates or corporate registration – which frees more time for civil servants to focus on states’ sovereign and strategic missions.”

On Time International plans to deploy its activities by creating business centers – called “one-stop shops” – in cities and rural areas, close to populations. In these centers, families, business owners and individuals will be listened to, guided and advised while completing their administrative procedures. All requests should be addressed within a deadline set in advance, and complying with this deadline will be a key performance indicator. With such approach, On Time International is committed to deliver quality public service, in a reliable and efficient way.

To support these “one stop shops”, data centers should be created to archive files and application forms and encourage the development of e-governance in partner countries over the long term. As a conclusion, Alpha Diallo explained: “We want to set-up an ambitious public-private partnership in Africa. If we manage to convince public decision makers whom we will meet with, 1 million jobs can be created by 2020 as a part of our deployment plan.”

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of On Time International.

Press inquiries:
Nanaïssa Diakité – ndiakite@apcoworldwide.com – + 33 6 14 72 27 97 – whatsapp
Anne-Elvire Kormann-Esmel – aesmel@apcoworldwide.com – + 33 6 46 41 77 84 – whatsapp
Photos credits: Lassana Doumbia

About On Time International
Building on the expertise that On Time Government Services (www.OnTimeGroup.com) developed in the Middle-East region, On Time International was created to provide public authorities across the world with solutions and tailored tools, in order to support their public service mission. On Time International aims to provide essential services to companies and individuals in their daily life, by creating local service centers (“one stop shops”) offering support on administrative and business management issues. The main objective is to bring authorities closer to end users while delivering quality service. On Time International wants to create an ambitious public-private partnership, serving authorities for the benefit of populations.
http://www.ontimegroup.com/

Source:: On Time International expands operations in Africa to simplify access to public services for citizens

Categories: AFRICA

Japan-Egypt Summit Meeting

On Monday, February 29, commencing at around 6:43 p.m. for approximately 50 minutes, Mr. Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan, held a summit meeting at the Prime Minister’s Office with H. E. Mr. Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, President of the Arab Republic of Egypt, who was making an official working visit to Japan. The overview of the meeting is as follows.

1 Japan- Egypt Relations

(1) Opening Remarks

1. Prime Minister Abe stated the following in the opening remarks.
I am very happy to be meeting with President El-Sisi in Japan. I was greatly impressed by President El-Sisi’s wonderful speech delivered to the National Diet today. Egypt is a cornerstone of stability in the Middle East, and I would like to pay my respect for President El-Sisi’s efforts to achieve stability and development.

2. In response, President El-Sisi expressed his great pleasure in visiting Japan, an excellent country that he admires, and stated that he hopes this visit to Japan will advance bilateral relations in an even more positive direction.

(2) Economy and Education

1. Prime Minister Abe stated the following.
Japan intends to assist at public and private levels Egypt’s efforts to achieve stability and development. A Joint Meeting of the Japan-Egypt Business Committee will take place, and I am pleased to hear about the planned signing of documents related to business initiatives with participation by Japanese companies worth a total of about two trillion yen. The Government of Japan will proactively support activities by Japanese companies and also intends to extend new ODA loan totaling about 41.1 billion yen for the Electricity Distribution System Improvement Project. The construction of the Grand Egyptian Museum is a symbol of friendly cooperative relations between the two countries, and Japan will expeditiously proceed with the consultation of additional yen loan aimed at an early completion. Japan will cooperate in the reinforcement of the healthcare system, and cultivation of human resources, such as doctors and nurses, and other activities aimed at realizing universal health coverage in Egypt and contribute in raising the level of medical care in Egypt by utilizing medical equipment and technologies from Japanese companies.

Education and human resource training are the foundation of nation building. Japan intends to strengthen cooperation in doubling the number of Egyptian exchange students and trainees in order to promote the adoption of Japanese-style education via the Egypt-Japan Education Partnership (EJEP). Japan will continue assistance in the advancement of the Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology (E-JUST), the core component of cooperation in the fields of higher education and science and technology between the two countries.

2. In response, President El-Sisi stated that he wishes to use this visit to Japan to deepen cooperation in the fields of education, economy and development, and energy and transportation.

2 Cooperation at International Arena and Regional Affairs

The two leaders agreed to contribute to regional and global peace, stability, and prosperity as non-permanent member countries of the United Nations Security Council. They also exchanged views on regional affairs in which the two countries share interests.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan.

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Source:: Japan-Egypt Summit Meeting

Categories: AFRICA

British Embassy in Angola and BP sign Chevening MoU

On Tuesday 23 February 2016, the British Embassy in Luanda signed a Chevening partnership with BP offering up to eight jointly funded scholarships for Angolan scholars to study Masters Degrees in the UK over the next two academic years. The official signing was witnessed by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, Jeffrey Mountevans and the Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy to Angola, Baroness Northover.

Chevening is the UK Government’s global scholarship programme, funded by the Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) and partner organisations. The programme makes awards to outstanding scholars with leadership potential from around the world to study fully funded postgraduate courses at UK universities.

BP has been in Angola for more than 25 years. In the 1990s BP acquired interests in four deep-water blocks offshore Angola. In 2011 BP acquired interests in five new deep and ultra-deep water blocks in the Kwanza and Benguela basins, making Angola one of the most important assets in BP’s exploration and production portfolio.

The British Ambassador to Angola, John Dennis, expressed his excitement about the joint Chevening-BP scholarship: “I am delighted to see BP come onboard to support the British Government’s illustrious Chevening Scholarship in Angola. BPs contribution will help to strenghten the healthy ties between the UK and Angola even further and will provide greater access to UK Education for future decision-makers and opinion-formers from Angola.”

Paulo Pizarro, Vice President for Communications and External Relations representing BP said ‘’ It is a great honour and satisfaction that on behalf of BP I will be signing this agreement with the Foreign Office. This will contribute to the growth and professional development of future leaders in Angola and this is more important than ever now that we are supporting this to build capability to boost domestic production and sustain economic growth in Angola”

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of British Embassy Luanda.

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Source:: British Embassy in Angola and BP sign Chevening MoU

Categories: AFRICA

FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

March 1, 2016

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-16-009

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both theGeneral NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in South Sudan as identified below.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. Please note that projects that do not meet the protection/assistance needs below will not be considered.

Country-specific Provisions:

(a) For activities in Central and Western Equatoria states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

ii. Healthcare (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; HIV/AIDS treatment; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

iv. Psychosocial support/mental health

(b) For activities in Unity and Upper Nile states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention (N.B. PRM will not fund projects in Yida in FY 2016):

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response; prevention of military recruitment and ensuring civilian character of refugee sites)

ii. Health (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Education (primary and/or secondary)

iv. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

v. Psychosocial support/mental health

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: May 1 – September 15, 2016

Duration of Activity: Program plans for one, two, or three years will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed one year (12 months) in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be more than $1,500,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

3. Other:

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively.

NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). The analysis should identify specific at-risk sub-populations of women and girls, in particular women and girl heads of households, out-of-school girls, girls with disabilities, married girls, and adolescent mothers who are often unaware of and excluded from mainstream interventions and service delivery and who may be essentially hidden. A gender analysis should be included in all applications for funding and is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. (Applicants are encouraged to make timely requests to UNHCR to allow for sufficient time to review proposed activities and process letters of support);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of and sensitivity to conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates.

New page limits: Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 15 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 10 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal narrative reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Please note that organizations applying for livelihoods project funding must include both a market analysis and a beneficiary competency/capacity assessment as part of the proposal package. Please see the General NGO Guidelines for more details.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number, as applicable.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2015 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in one year (12-month) cycles for a period not to exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. Applicants should use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for the first year of a multi-year application. Multi-year funding applicants may use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposal narratives and budgets can be updated yearly upon submission of new noncompeting single year proposal narrative template with an updated budget, each year.

New page limits: Multi-year proposals using PRM’s multi-year template must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in one year (12- month) increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Follow-on funding applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Follow-on year applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late submissions will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request single-year and multi-year funding proposal narrative templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” tools and tips page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive anNCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1-866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here.

(i) In accordance with 2 CFR §200.113, Mandatory disclosures, the non-Federal entity or applicant for a Federal award must disclose, in a timely manner, in writing to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity all violations of Federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the Federal award. Non-Federal entities that have received a Federal award including the term and condition outlined in Appendix XII—Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters are required to report certain civil, criminal, or administrative proceedings to SAM. Failure to make required disclosures can result in any of the remedies described in 2 CFR §200.338 Remedies for noncompliance, including suspension or debarment. (See also 2 CFR part 180, 31 U.S.C. 3321, and 41 U.S.C. 2313.)

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators: In an effort to streamline the proposal writing/reviewing process and better measure the impact of the Bureau’s work, PRM requires the use of standardized indicators in the health, protection, child protection, education, WASH, livelihoods, emergency shelter, nutrition and food security, and core relief items (non-food items) sectors. Applicants must fill in numerical and/or percentage targets for each indicator. Sphere standards should be used as targets, unless otherwise noted. Proposals must include all standardized indicators that apply to the program. Please refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of all standardized indicators that must be included.

(b) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Statement/Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Accountability

(vi) Coordination

(vii) Transition and Capacity-Building

(viii) Management and Past Performance

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

3. Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

Acting Horn of Africa Team Leader Wossie Mazengia: MazengiaW@state.gov, 202-453-9380, Washington, D.C.; please include Program Officers Martha Marrazza (MarrazzaM@state.gov) and Kristin Alderman(AldermanKL@state.gov) on email correspondences).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa David Moore: MooreDT@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Regional Horn Refugee Coordinator Assistant Sandra Bedoya-Hanson: Bedoya-HansonSP@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of U.S. Department of State.

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Source:: FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Categories: AFRICA

FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

March 1, 2016

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-16-009

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both theGeneral NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in South Sudan as identified below.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. Please note that projects that do not meet the protection/assistance needs below will not be considered.

Country-specific Provisions:

(a) For activities in Central and Western Equatoria states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

ii. Healthcare (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; HIV/AIDS treatment; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

iv. Psychosocial support/mental health

(b) For activities in Unity and Upper Nile states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention (N.B. PRM will not fund projects in Yida in FY 2016):

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response; prevention of military recruitment and ensuring civilian character of refugee sites)

ii. Health (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Education (primary and/or secondary)

iv. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

v. Psychosocial support/mental health

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: May 1 – September 15, 2016

Duration of Activity: Program plans for one, two, or three years will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed one year (12 months) in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be more than $1,500,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

3. Other:

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively.

NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). The analysis should identify specific at-risk sub-populations of women and girls, in particular women and girl heads of households, out-of-school girls, girls with disabilities, married girls, and adolescent mothers who are often unaware of and excluded from mainstream interventions and service delivery and who may be essentially hidden. A gender analysis should be included in all applications for funding and is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. (Applicants are encouraged to make timely requests to UNHCR to allow for sufficient time to review proposed activities and process letters of support);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of and sensitivity to conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates.

New page limits: Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 15 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 10 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal narrative reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Please note that organizations applying for livelihoods project funding must include both a market analysis and a beneficiary competency/capacity assessment as part of the proposal package. Please see the General NGO Guidelines for more details.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number, as applicable.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2015 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in one year (12-month) cycles for a period not to exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. Applicants should use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for the first year of a multi-year application. Multi-year funding applicants may use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposal narratives and budgets can be updated yearly upon submission of new noncompeting single year proposal narrative template with an updated budget, each year.

New page limits: Multi-year proposals using PRM’s multi-year template must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in one year (12- month) increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Follow-on funding applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Follow-on year applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late submissions will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request single-year and multi-year funding proposal narrative templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” tools and tips page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive anNCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1-866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here.

(i) In accordance with 2 CFR §200.113, Mandatory disclosures, the non-Federal entity or applicant for a Federal award must disclose, in a timely manner, in writing to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity all violations of Federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the Federal award. Non-Federal entities that have received a Federal award including the term and condition outlined in Appendix XII—Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters are required to report certain civil, criminal, or administrative proceedings to SAM. Failure to make required disclosures can result in any of the remedies described in 2 CFR §200.338 Remedies for noncompliance, including suspension or debarment. (See also 2 CFR part 180, 31 U.S.C. 3321, and 41 U.S.C. 2313.)

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators: In an effort to streamline the proposal writing/reviewing process and better measure the impact of the Bureau’s work, PRM requires the use of standardized indicators in the health, protection, child protection, education, WASH, livelihoods, emergency shelter, nutrition and food security, and core relief items (non-food items) sectors. Applicants must fill in numerical and/or percentage targets for each indicator. Sphere standards should be used as targets, unless otherwise noted. Proposals must include all standardized indicators that apply to the program. Please refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of all standardized indicators that must be included.

(b) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Statement/Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Accountability

(vi) Coordination

(vii) Transition and Capacity-Building

(viii) Management and Past Performance

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

3. Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

Acting Horn of Africa Team Leader Wossie Mazengia: MazengiaW@state.gov, 202-453-9380, Washington, D.C.; please include Program Officers Martha Marrazza (MarrazzaM@state.gov) and Kristin Alderman(AldermanKL@state.gov) on email correspondences).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa David Moore: MooreDT@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Regional Horn Refugee Coordinator Assistant Sandra Bedoya-Hanson: Bedoya-HansonSP@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of U.S. Department of State.

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Source:: FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Categories: AFRICA

FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

March 1, 2016

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-16-009

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both theGeneral NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in South Sudan as identified below.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. Please note that projects that do not meet the protection/assistance needs below will not be considered.

Country-specific Provisions:

(a) For activities in Central and Western Equatoria states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

ii. Healthcare (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; HIV/AIDS treatment; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

iv. Psychosocial support/mental health

(b) For activities in Unity and Upper Nile states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention (N.B. PRM will not fund projects in Yida in FY 2016):

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response; prevention of military recruitment and ensuring civilian character of refugee sites)

ii. Health (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Education (primary and/or secondary)

iv. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

v. Psychosocial support/mental health

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: May 1 – September 15, 2016

Duration of Activity: Program plans for one, two, or three years will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed one year (12 months) in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be more than $1,500,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

3. Other:

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively.

NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). The analysis should identify specific at-risk sub-populations of women and girls, in particular women and girl heads of households, out-of-school girls, girls with disabilities, married girls, and adolescent mothers who are often unaware of and excluded from mainstream interventions and service delivery and who may be essentially hidden. A gender analysis should be included in all applications for funding and is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. (Applicants are encouraged to make timely requests to UNHCR to allow for sufficient time to review proposed activities and process letters of support);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of and sensitivity to conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates.

New page limits: Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 15 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 10 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal narrative reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Please note that organizations applying for livelihoods project funding must include both a market analysis and a beneficiary competency/capacity assessment as part of the proposal package. Please see the General NGO Guidelines for more details.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number, as applicable.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2015 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in one year (12-month) cycles for a period not to exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. Applicants should use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for the first year of a multi-year application. Multi-year funding applicants may use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposal narratives and budgets can be updated yearly upon submission of new noncompeting single year proposal narrative template with an updated budget, each year.

New page limits: Multi-year proposals using PRM’s multi-year template must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in one year (12- month) increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Follow-on funding applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Follow-on year applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late submissions will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request single-year and multi-year funding proposal narrative templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” tools and tips page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive anNCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1-866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here.

(i) In accordance with 2 CFR §200.113, Mandatory disclosures, the non-Federal entity or applicant for a Federal award must disclose, in a timely manner, in writing to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity all violations of Federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the Federal award. Non-Federal entities that have received a Federal award including the term and condition outlined in Appendix XII—Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters are required to report certain civil, criminal, or administrative proceedings to SAM. Failure to make required disclosures can result in any of the remedies described in 2 CFR §200.338 Remedies for noncompliance, including suspension or debarment. (See also 2 CFR part 180, 31 U.S.C. 3321, and 41 U.S.C. 2313.)

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators: In an effort to streamline the proposal writing/reviewing process and better measure the impact of the Bureau’s work, PRM requires the use of standardized indicators in the health, protection, child protection, education, WASH, livelihoods, emergency shelter, nutrition and food security, and core relief items (non-food items) sectors. Applicants must fill in numerical and/or percentage targets for each indicator. Sphere standards should be used as targets, unless otherwise noted. Proposals must include all standardized indicators that apply to the program. Please refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of all standardized indicators that must be included.

(b) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Statement/Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Accountability

(vi) Coordination

(vii) Transition and Capacity-Building

(viii) Management and Past Performance

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

3. Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

Acting Horn of Africa Team Leader Wossie Mazengia: MazengiaW@state.gov, 202-453-9380, Washington, D.C.; please include Program Officers Martha Marrazza (MarrazzaM@state.gov) and Kristin Alderman(AldermanKL@state.gov) on email correspondences).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa David Moore: MooreDT@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Regional Horn Refugee Coordinator Assistant Sandra Bedoya-Hanson: Bedoya-HansonSP@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of U.S. Department of State.

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Source:: FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Categories: AFRICA

FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

March 1, 2016

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-16-009

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both theGeneral NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in South Sudan as identified below.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. Please note that projects that do not meet the protection/assistance needs below will not be considered.

Country-specific Provisions:

(a) For activities in Central and Western Equatoria states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

ii. Healthcare (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; HIV/AIDS treatment; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

iv. Psychosocial support/mental health

(b) For activities in Unity and Upper Nile states, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention (N.B. PRM will not fund projects in Yida in FY 2016):

i. Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response; prevention of military recruitment and ensuring civilian character of refugee sites)

ii. Health (primary care; reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

iii. Education (primary and/or secondary)

iv. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

v. Psychosocial support/mental health

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: May 1 – September 15, 2016

Duration of Activity: Program plans for one, two, or three years will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed one year (12 months) in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be more than $1,500,000 per year or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

3. Other:

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively.

NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). The analysis should identify specific at-risk sub-populations of women and girls, in particular women and girl heads of households, out-of-school girls, girls with disabilities, married girls, and adolescent mothers who are often unaware of and excluded from mainstream interventions and service delivery and who may be essentially hidden. A gender analysis should be included in all applications for funding and is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. (Applicants are encouraged to make timely requests to UNHCR to allow for sufficient time to review proposed activities and process letters of support);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of and sensitivity to conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates.

New page limits: Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 15 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 10 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal narrative reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Please note that organizations applying for livelihoods project funding must include both a market analysis and a beneficiary competency/capacity assessment as part of the proposal package. Please see the General NGO Guidelines for more details.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number, as applicable.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2015 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in one year (12-month) cycles for a period not to exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. Applicants should use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for the first year of a multi-year application. Multi-year funding applicants may use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposal narratives and budgets can be updated yearly upon submission of new noncompeting single year proposal narrative template with an updated budget, each year.

New page limits: Multi-year proposals using PRM’s multi-year template must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in one year (12- month) increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Follow-on funding applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Follow-on year applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late submissions will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request single-year and multi-year funding proposal narrative templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” tools and tips page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive anNCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1-866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here.

(i) In accordance with 2 CFR §200.113, Mandatory disclosures, the non-Federal entity or applicant for a Federal award must disclose, in a timely manner, in writing to the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity all violations of Federal criminal law involving fraud, bribery, or gratuity violations potentially affecting the Federal award. Non-Federal entities that have received a Federal award including the term and condition outlined in Appendix XII—Award Term and Condition for Recipient Integrity and Performance Matters are required to report certain civil, criminal, or administrative proceedings to SAM. Failure to make required disclosures can result in any of the remedies described in 2 CFR §200.338 Remedies for noncompliance, including suspension or debarment. (See also 2 CFR part 180, 31 U.S.C. 3321, and 41 U.S.C. 2313.)

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators: In an effort to streamline the proposal writing/reviewing process and better measure the impact of the Bureau’s work, PRM requires the use of standardized indicators in the health, protection, child protection, education, WASH, livelihoods, emergency shelter, nutrition and food security, and core relief items (non-food items) sectors. Applicants must fill in numerical and/or percentage targets for each indicator. Sphere standards should be used as targets, unless otherwise noted. Proposals must include all standardized indicators that apply to the program. Please refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of all standardized indicators that must be included.

(b) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Statement/Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Accountability

(vi) Coordination

(vii) Transition and Capacity-Building

(viii) Management and Past Performance

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

3. Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

Acting Horn of Africa Team Leader Wossie Mazengia: MazengiaW@state.gov, 202-453-9380, Washington, D.C.; please include Program Officers Martha Marrazza (MarrazzaM@state.gov) and Kristin Alderman(AldermanKL@state.gov) on email correspondences).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa David Moore: MooreDT@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Regional Horn Refugee Coordinator Assistant Sandra Bedoya-Hanson: Bedoya-HansonSP@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of U.S. Department of State.

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Source:: FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in South Sudan

Categories: AFRICA

Global industry leaders to explore China-OIC joint investment opportunities at groundbreaking forum

China’s meteoric economic rise and the burgeoning ascendancy of OIC nations in the international landscape are altering global economic power dynamics, and players from both markets are eager to tap the lucrative opportunities arising from stronger bilateral ties.

With a more inclusive foreign policy, including a renewed stance on the Middle East and Africa, Chinese president Xi Jinping has set the motion for greater China-OIC relations – with the ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative a central pillar to China’s grand strategy. Yet, questions remain including: what are the considerations for market players from both sides of the divide in capitalizing this flow of opportunities and how can these linkages be created?

In light of this development, the Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) (http://www.ICD-ps.org), private sector arm of Islamic Development Bank Group (IDB), is hosting for the first time ever, a groundbreaking event to connect investors and regulators from Asia, Africa and the Gulf with senior decision-makers of the world’s second-largest economy.

To be held at the Westin Beijing Financial Street Hotel in Beijing on the 22nd March 2016, and with senior-level participation from state-owned funds such as the Silk Road Fund and the China Africa Development Fund, the pioneering China OIC Forum is expected to gather over 300 senior regulators, multilateral institutions and market players with the aim of enhancing partnerships between key industry players and multilateral bodies as well as identify joint investment opportunities.

Why attend?

  • The opportunity to meet decision-makers from China’s largest funds, banks and state-owned enterprises
  • High-level discussions focused on opportunities available to Chinese firms and institutions in global project and infrastructure finance deals
  • Find out what investment options are available to Chinese investors in key OIC markets in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, and
  • Establish connections and trade partnerships in line with the ‘One Belt, One Road’ initiative.

With a stellar speaker lineup, the forum will serve as an excellent platform to meet senior decision-makers from Chinese state-owned firms and development banks as well as leading bankers and corporates from key OIC markets.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD).

ICD Profile

The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (“ICD”) (http://www.ICD-ps.org) is a multilateral development financial institution and is part of the Islamic Development Bank (“IDB”) Group.

ICD was established in November 1999 to support the economic development of its member countries through the provision of finance for private sector projects, promoting competition and entrepreneurship, providing advisory services to the governments and private companies and encouraging cross border investments.

ICD has an authorized capital of $4 billion. Currently, the shareholders of ICD are the IDB (50%), 52 Islamic countries (30%) five public financial institutions (20%).

ICD fosters sustainable economic growth in its 52 member countries by financing private sector investment, mobilizing capital in the international financial markets, and providing advisory services to business and governments. ICD financing projects are selected on the basis of their contribution to economic development considering factors such as job creation, Islamic finance development, contribution to exports etc. ICD also provides advisory services to governments and private sector groups on policies designed to encourage the establishment, expansion and modernization of private enterprises, development of capital markets, best management practices and to enhance the role of the market economy. ICD operates to complement the activities of the IDB in member countries and also that of national financial institutions.

In November 2014, Fitch rated ICD ‘AA/F1+’ with a stable outlook. In April 2015, Moody’s assigns Aa3/P-1 rating to ICD with a stable outlook. In December 2015, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services assigned its ‘AA’ rating to ICD with stable outlook.

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Source:: Global industry leaders to explore China-OIC joint investment opportunities at groundbreaking forum

Categories: AFRICA

The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) is organizing the ninth meeting of The International Development Finance Club (IDFC) “the Club Sherpas”

The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) is organizing on February 29 and March 1, 2016 the ninth meeting of The International Development Finance Club (IDFC) “the Club Sherpas” in the regional office of Islamic Development Bank Group (IDB) in Rabat, Morocco and IDB Group Business Forum “THQAH”.

IDFC is a group of like-minded development banks from across the globe that collaborate to face global challenges. Members join their forces (funding capacities, local and international experience, market and product know-how), to complement each other’s needs and objectives. IDFC representatives meet regularly since 2010 in order to formalize their cooperation and address global challenges in development, particularly the issues related to climate change, financing infrastructure projects, social development, poverty alleviation, green growth and funding innovation.

ICD is hosting all members of the IDFC this year for the 1st Sherpa Meeting in 2016 in the IDBG regional office in Morocco (Rabat). By hosting this event, ICD demonstrates its commitment to promote development best practices and its willingness to work continuously with other institutions by providing its expertise in Islamic finance and market knowledge of its 52 member countries, Africa, the Middle – East, Asia and Central Europe.

As a member of IDFC, ICD will create a platform to intensify its efforts and increase its interventions in different member countries through strategic partnerships and mobilizing the necessary funding for its development projects as well as sharing the expertise of each member. Our meeting today will tackle global challenges but also to present the issues related to the development of Islamic finance.

Since 2015, ICD has been a member of the IDFC in its role of building strategic partnerships for development of the private sector and promoting Islamic Finance globally.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD).

ICD Profile

The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (“ICD”) is a multilateral development financial institution and is part of the Islamic Development Bank (“IDB”) Group.

ICD was established in November 1999 to support the economic development of its member countries through the provision of finance for private sector projects, promoting competition and entrepreneurship, providing advisory services to the governments and private companies and encouraging cross border investments.

ICD has an authorized capital of $4 billion. Currently, the shareholders of ICD are the IDB (50%), 52 Islamic countries (30%) five public financial institutions (20%).

ICD fosters sustainable economic growth in its 52 member countries by financing private sector investment, mobilizing capital in the international financial markets, and providing advisory services to business and governments. ICD financing projects are selected on the basis of their contribution to economic development considering factors such as job creation, Islamic finance development, contribution to exports etc. ICD also provides advisory services to governments and private sector groups on policies designed to encourage the establishment, expansion and modernization of private enterprises, development of capital markets, best management practices and to enhance the role of the market economy. ICD operates to complement the activities of the IDB in member countries and also that of national financial institutions.

In November 2014, Fitch rated ICD ‘AA/F1+’ with a stable outlook. In April 2015, Moody’s assigns Aa3/P-1 rating to ICD with a stable outlook. In December 2015, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services assigned its ‘AA’ rating to ICD with stable outlook.

Source:: The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) is organizing the ninth meeting of The International Development Finance Club (IDFC) “the Club Sherpas”

Categories: AFRICA

National Inter-Faith Dialogue Communique

A National Interfaith Dialogue Forum under the auspices of the British High Commission, Accra and attended by religious leaders, political party representatives, traditional leaders, academia, the security agencies, Community Based Organisations, State Institutions (NCCE, CHRAJ,EC etc), Students of Tertiary Institutions, youth and women groups in the northern regions of Ghana, having deliberated upon promoting peaceful co-existence and strengthening commitments to interfaith harmony before, during and after the 2016 general elections in Ghana resolved as follows:

That the 2016 presidential and parliamentary elections be conducted in a peaceful atmosphere.
That there should be optimum intra and inter religious and political tolerance.
That religious leaders be encouraged to preach peace in their daily and weekly sermons to engender peace in the country.
That all vigilante groups in the political parties should be disbanded
That the media should be circumspect in their reportage.
That newspaper review and political talk show programmes in both print and electronic media s be well managed, devoid of inflammatory and unsubstantiated commentaries.
That in the event of any misunderstanding arising out of the election results, parties must use the due process of law to seek redress.
That perpetrators of religious and political violence should be subjected to the laws of Ghana
That no religious, traditional and political leaders should interfere in any matter that concerns the breach of the law by their followers and members
That the security agencies must conduct themselves professionally and impartially.
That all political parties should strictly adhere to the Political Parties’ Code of Conduct.
That citizens should conduct themselves responsibly, support and co-operate with the law enforcement agencies as prescribed by the Public Order Act.
That the Electoral Commission should be impartial in the conduct of the elections.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of British High Commission Accra.

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Source:: National Inter-Faith Dialogue Communique

Categories: AFRICA

The African Union Commission marks the Black History month

H.E Mr. Erastus Mwencha, Deputy Chairperson of the African Union Commission (AUC) led the commission in celebrating the Black History Month. In commemorating the annual event, H.E Mr. Mwencha called on Africans and the Africans- Americans to reflect and recognize their common heritage, shared values and philosophies that have served them well in addressing challenges such as colonialism, instability and other realities.

The Deputy Chairperson also called on Africans to define themselves and to have the courage to identify progressive authentic principles and norms that forms the foundation of the Black race.

While appreciating the struggle for equality, democracy, justice, and human rights, H.E Mr. Mwencha called on the Africans and the Africans- Americans to emulate the non-violence nature demonstrated by icons such as Martin Luther King Jr. during the civil rights movement in America in the mid-1950s. He challenged victims of injustice to seek recourse through peaceful protests and non-violent or extremist means.

H.E Mr. Mwencha joined in watching a movie organized by the Embassy of Democratic Republic of Congo in collaboration with US Mission to African Union to mark the Black History Month, at the Nelson Mandela Plenary Hall, African Union Commission Headquarters, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of African Union Commission (AUC).

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Source:: The African Union Commission marks the Black History month

Categories: AFRICA