Urgent action needed to help Ethiopia’s farmers produce food in main cropping season

With just six weeks left before the start of the main cropping season in Ethiopia, FAO is calling for urgent funding to help farmers sow their fields and prevent drought-hit areas of the country from falling deeper into hunger and food insecurity. If seeds are not delivered in time, help will be too late to secure a decent harvest from the imminent meher season, which produces 85 percent of the nation’s food supply, the UN agency said today.

Yet while the food security situation is worsening, the overall funding response to the crisis has so far been disappointing, with just 15 percent of FAO’s 2016 appeal for Ethiopia covered.

“The meher season will be critical to improving families’ food security and self-sufficiency in 2016. Seed distributions allowing farmers to plant crops and produce food must be a humanitarian priority,” said the agency’s country representative Amadou Allahoury Diallo. Decreasing dependence on external humanitarian assistance, he continued, will diminish the costs of food aid.

Some $10 million is needed by FAO within the next two weeks to distribute seeds to Ethiopian families at risk of hunger and losing their livelihoods. About 10.2 million people in Ethiopia are food insecure following successive crop failures and widespread livestock deaths caused by the El Niño-induced drought since early 2015. With this year’s delayed and erratic spring rains, the situation may become worse in the most affected areas, particularly in the north.

Ethiopia’s government has already dedicated considerable resources to the El Niño response and is working closely with FAO to help ramp up joint efforts.

Underserved districts

Nearly a third of all districts in the country – some 224 – are now severely food insecure. That number is some 20 percent higher than just three months ago.

Recent estimates by Ethiopia’s Bureau of Agriculture indicate that some 1.7 million farming families are seed insecure, meaning they do not have the inputs required to plant in the meher season, which starts as early as mid-June for some crops, with planting ongoing until August for others.

More than 90 districts are currently not receiving any kind of emergency seed support or are insufficiently covered, according to FAO Surge Response Team Leader Pierre Vauthier. “It’s these forgotten districts that FAO is targeting — but without immediate funding support, some 150,000 households will miss their best chance of growing food to bring them through the year,” he said.

Depleted seed reserves

For many households, seed reserves are extremely depleted following unsuccessful planting and re-planting in 2015, while families in the most affected areas have been forced to consume their seeds as food.

As a result of the poor 2015 harvest, farmers’ income has been reduced and purchasing power constrained, further limiting their ability to buy the seeds and inputs they need to produce staple crops like maize, sorghum, teff, wheat, and root crops.

Because the spring rains were initially erratic and delayed, even those farmers who had seeds may not have planted enough to meet their household’s needs, especially in the north.

A good meher season will improve food availability nationwide and enhance access to food and reduce reliance on external humanitarian assistance in the medium term.

FAO’s response to El Niño

This year, FAO, together with the government and partners, has already distributed seed and planting materials for maize, sweet potato, Irish potato and vegetables in some of the most affected areas and continues to support livestock herders with distributions of survival animal feed. FAO is also helping farmers produce fodder and improve access to water for livestock. Herds across the country have also benefited from vaccination and treatment campaigns to address their increasing vulnerability to disease as a result of drought.

“A failure to deliver seed aid now will almost certainly mean a failure of the meher season for the most vulnerable, with dire consequences for food security. If we are to make a difference, the funds need to come in and they need to come in now,” said Allahoury Diallo.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Urgent action needed to help Ethiopia’s farmers produce food in main cropping season

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

Ghana Immigration Service Training School Opens IT Laboratory

IOM Ghana and the Ghana Immigration Service (GIS) have opened an information technology laboratory at the GIS Training School and Academy (ISATS) at Assin Fosu, Central Region of Ghana.

The project, designed to build GIS information technology capacity, was funded by the European Union (EU) through the Ghana Integrated Migration Management Approach (GIMMA) project, implemented jointly by GIS and IOM.

The 70-computer lab, which was set up by IOM, is also equipped with a projector, network server and internet connection.

“In this digital age, IT skills are required in all areas of immigration duties. The lab will greatly enhance the capacity of immigration officers to perform their day-to-day migration management duties more professionally and effectively,” said GIMMA Project Manager Kazumi Nakamura.

Ghana experiences complex migration flows and the GIS has been increasingly called upon to respond to new challenges, resulting in more calls for training and skills development.

The three-year EUR 3 million GIMMA project, funded by the EU under the framework of 10th European Development Fund, is helping to build GIS’ operational capacity to secure and protect the country’s borders; empower migrants to make informed migratory decisions; and improve the country’s migration data management capacity.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Ghana Immigration Service Training School Opens IT Laboratory

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

IOM Organizes Cultural Festival on Safe Migration in Agadez, Niger

IOM Niger has organized a three-day “Festival on Safe and Informed Migration” in Agadez, Niger.

The objective was to raise awareness and increase access to information about migration for transiting and potential migrants, the host population and migrants living in the city’s migrant ghettos.

“We have never had a festival that brought together migrants like this, because we never could access the ghettos to talk to the migrants and involve them in cultural activities. In fact, we couldn’t have received a more enthusiastic reaction from them. This has been a great way to disseminate information about migration and integration. It has also broken down barriers between the local community and the migrants,” said the manager of the IOM Agadez transit center, Azaoua Mahaman.

The festival opened at the IOM transit center with a video screening exploring migration in Niger and in the region. It included documentaries from Odysseus 2.0, a project which produced photos and videos of the migration route to Europe.

Other activities on Day 1 included a football match in the town square between a migrant team and young people from Agadez and an evening of participatory theatre to encourage debate about informed decisions about migration and safer alternatives to irregular routes.

Day 2 focused on the host community and a public discussion was organized at the Sultanate of Aïr with the active participation of Agadez Association of Women. In the evening a mobile cinema caravan showed more videos and an educational movie on the economy of migration: “Ouaga Saga.”

On the Day 3 IOM staff took part in a radio talk show “Cercle des Migrants”, produced by IOM, to answer to listeners’ questions. The festival concluded with a video forum in an Agadez ghetto, followed by a Question and Answer session.

The festival was part of an IOM project: “Supporting Informed Migration in Niger,” co-funded by the European Union and the Italian Ministry of Interior.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: IOM Organizes Cultural Festival on Safe Migration in Agadez, Niger

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

IOM Investigates Fatal Migrant Shootings in Libya’s Bani Walid

IOM Libya staffer Ashraf Hassan met Thursday with Egyptian diplomats in Tunisia to investigate reports of the killings this week of more than a dozen Egyptian men, migrants bound for Europe, who authorities say were shot to death in Bani Walid, near Libya’s Mediterranean coast.

Hassan said the latest information from Libya is that a total of 32 migrants were in the hands of Libyan smugglers—10 of those migrants came from Syria, joined by 20 migrants from Egypt and two Somalis. He said 13 Egyptians were killed by gunfire, in an attack reportedly launched in retaliation for the killing of three smugglers in a dispute with migrants in their custody.

Media reports from the region mentioned a greater number of casualties—as many as 16 Egyptians and 14 Syrians for a total of 30 fatalities—but these reports could not be verified by IOM.

IOM is prepared to assist any of the 19 survivors of the clash who wish to return to their countries of origin under its Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration (AVRR) programme.

In the past two years, the programme has helped hundreds of third country nationals leave Libya and return to their homes in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South Asia and the Philippines. IOM was also asked to help to return cadavers of the 13 victims, but has made no commitment to do so at this time.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: IOM Investigates Fatal Migrant Shootings in Libya’s Bani Walid

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

Launch of the April 2016 International Monetary Fund (IMF) Regional Economic Outlook for Sub-Saharan Africa Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Launch of the April 2016 IMF Regional Economic Outlook Report title, Sub-Saharan Africa: Time for a Policy Reset.

Where: In Uganda, Serena Hotel, Kampala.

In Cote d’Ivoire, Auditorium de la Primature, Abidjan.

When: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 9:30 am in Uganda; 4:30 pm in Cote d’Ivoire

Who: Ms. Antoinette Sayeh, Director, African Department, IMF (to present in Uganda)

Mr. Roger Nord, Deputy Director, African Department, IMF (to present in

Cote d’Ivoire)

Press briefings will also be held soon after at both locations:

11:55am–12:30pm, Addis Room, Serena Hotel, Kampala, Uganda;
6:45–7:15 pm, Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire

How: Media are invited to attend both events.

Documents Under Embargo:

The Report on the April 2016 SSA Regional Economic Outlook, a Press Release, Feature Article, and Podcast will be posted under embargo at the IMF Press Center on Monday, May 2, 2016 at 5:00 am Washington DC time (12:00 pm, Noon in Kampala; 9:00 am in Abidjan).

The embargo will lift on Tuesday, May 3, 2016 at 3:00am Washington, D.C. time (10:00 am in Kampala, 7:00am in Abidjan).

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Launch of the April 2016 International Monetary Fund (IMF) Regional Economic Outlook for Sub-Saharan Africa Tuesday, May 3, 2016

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

British High Commissioner urges Zambian MPs to tackle GBV

I am delighted to be here today on behalf of the UK government and its Department for International Development (DFID). It was only last week that I arrived in Zambia and presented my credentials to His Excellency President Lungu. But I was keen to join this event when I heard about it. I remember from my previous diplomatic posting to Zambia, ten years ago, that the Gender Based Violence is rife in Zambia as it is, sadly, in so many countries. Therefore, I am glad that the UK is joining Zambia in its efforts to eliminate gender based violence and child marriage. And I would like to thank the Speaker of the National Assembly and the Clerk for enabling this event to happen.

Here’s a very ugly and stark fact.

Globally if you are a woman aged between 15 and 45 years you are more likely to be maimed and die from male violence than from malaria, cancer, traffic accidents and war combined.

Such violence is used to intimidate, humiliate and discredit women and to force them into a silent, second-class citizenship.

The statistics on violence against women and girls are shocking. Globally 1 in 3 women is beaten or sexually abused in her lifetime.Usually, the abuser is a member of her own family or someone she knows. And up to half of sexual assaults are committed against girls under 16.

In Zambia, almost half of women aged 15 to 49 years have experienced physical violence. Homes should be places of refuge and safety. For too many women in our societies, the UK included, our homes are places of hidden suffering.

I mention the UK because, tragically, this is a problem that seems to effect every country. In Britain between 1 and 1.3 million women suffer domestic violence each year, around 5%. This has been highlighted by a long-running BBC radio programme called “The Archers”, a soap about a rural farming community, which for the last 2 years has run a story line about a man abusing his wife – an insidious process as it begins gradually as emotional abuse as he criticizes her and undermines her confidence, before it turns more physically abusive. The programme has provoked an outpouring of disgust because this fiction is graphically illustrating what is really happening behind the scenes in all too many homes.

So what is the situation like in Zambia?

It is very serious. According to the Zambian Police Report for the third quarter of 2015, a total of 4951 GBV cases were reported country-wide in those 3 months alone. There were 1635 assaults and two-thirds of these were on women. That means around 340 assaults per month on average or 340 cases of beaten women each month. There were 688 cases of child defilement, all girls, around 230 per month or 76 per week. That’s 76 Zambian girls being attacked and defiled every week of the year, week after week. And we can be certain that these cases, reported to the Police, are only the tip of the ice-berg and that a lot more girls and women are being abused.

Let me give you an example. Take the case of a girl whom we will call Josephine, who lives in a rural district. Josephine is an orphan whose parents died when she was very young so that she lives with her grandmother. Josephine was abused and raped when she was a child. The man absconded. Josephine became pregnant and faced considerable stigma from her peers at school to the extent that she considered dropping out. But, supported by her grandparents, she started to receive help through the STOP GBV Project, a programme funded by USAID and DFID, attending a projects community dialogue on GBV at a nearby Rural Health Clinic, and receiving counseling from a community activist. On 26th March 2015 Josephine gave birth to a baby girl. But she is continuing to attend school. Later in the year she passed all eight subjects that she was taking in her Grade 7 final exams, scoring 695 points out of 900.

None of us here today should want gender based violence to remain hidden. So Zambian and international partners are committed together to supporting the victims of gender based violence and turning them into survivors. And we are committed to stopping gender based violence in the first place. This is why creating the right enabling environment is so important.

In recent years Zambia has demonstrated its strong commitment to addressing gender inequalities in the country. The UK Government is particularly delighted that Zambia has taken a strong lead in the fight against gender based violence with the implementation of the Anti GBV Act, its leadership on child marriage, which is a form of GBV as well as support to the drafting of a Marriage Bill which will make it illegal for children to marry. Zambia is indeed to be congratulated in being the first African country to establish Fast Track Courts for GBV cases.

However, there is still more that must be done:

  • we need to protect survivors of GBV and to this end, Zambia urgently needs to fulfill its commitments to increasing the number of shelters and safe houses available.

  • we need to learn early lessons from the establishment of the Fast Track Courts and ensure that these courts are more widely available to survivors across the country

  • all stakeholders involved (government, civil society and CPs) need to strengthen efforts for greater coordination around GBV

  • we need to work better together in order to maximize efforts and increase access to services for GBV survivors

  • finally, we need to challenge attitudes and practices which which have stopped too many girls and women having a voice and control over their own lives

As the USAID Mission Director pointed out, your role as MPs is critical in trying to effectively grapple with these important issues. We stand ready to support you and our partners in your efforts.

I should like to finish with the words of Josephine, the girl I mentioned earlier.

I am thankful for the STOP GBV project as it helped me stay in school and complete my primary education. And now I can dream of completing my education and becoming a doctor.

Thank you

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: British High Commissioner urges Zambian MPs to tackle GBV

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

UN human rights expert to assess the situation of migrants in Angola

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, François Crépeau, will visit Angola from 3 to 10 May 2016 to assess the country’s current migration programmes, policies and laws.

“Over the past decade Angola has experienced complex migration patterns consisting of both irregular and regular arriving migrants and asylum seekers,” Mr. Crépeau said. “Understanding how Angola is responding to the increasing number of migrants will be an essential part of my visit to the country.”

During his seven-day mission, the independent human rights expert will meet with a range of government officials responsible for border management, civil society, trade unions, international organisations and migrants themselves in Luanda, Cabinda and Lunda Norte. He will also visit detention centres.

At the end of the mission, Mr. Crépeau will share his preliminary conclusions and recommendations at a press conference on 10 May 2016 at 10:00 am, at the Continental Hotel, R. Rainha Ginga 18, Luanda. Access to the press conference is strictly limited to journalists.

The Special Rapporteur will present a comprehensive country mission report to the UN Human Rights Council in June 2017.

Mr. François Crépeau (Canada) was appointed Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants in June 2011 by the UN Human Rights Council, for an initial period of three years. As Special Rapporteur, he is independent from any government or organization and serves in his individual capacity. Mr. Crépeau is also Full Professor at the Faculty of Law of McGill University, in Montréal, where he holds the Hans and Tamar Oppenheimer Chair in Public International Law and is scientific director of the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. Learn more, log on to: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Migration/SRMigrants/Pages/SRMigrantsIndex.aspx

The Special Rapporteurs are part of what is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights system, is the general name of the Council’s independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms. Special Procedures mandate-holders are independent human rights experts appointed by the Human Rights Council to address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. They are not UN staff and are independent from any government or organization. They serve in their individual capacity and do not receive a salary for their work

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: UN human rights expert to assess the situation of migrants in Angola

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

Malawi: People with albinism face total extinction – UN Expert calls for urgent response

The United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of persons with albinism, Ikponwosa Ero, today warned that the atrocities faced by persons with albinism in Malawi render them “an endangered people group facing a risk of systemic extinction over time if nothing is done.”

“Persons with albinism, and parents of children with albinism, constantly live in fear of attack. Many do not sleep peacefully and have deliberately restricted their movement to the necessary minimum,” the human rights expert said at the end of her first official visit* to Malawi.

“The frequent involvement of close relatives in cases of attacks is highly disturbing, and persons with albinism are unable to trust even those who are supposed to care for and protect them,” Ms. Ero noted. “Consequently, persons with albinism in the current context of attacks are locked in a spiral of fear and poverty.”

The UN Independent Expert described the situation as “an emergency, a crisis disturbing in its proportions.” According to the police, 65 cases have been recorded since late 2014, and at least two further critical incidents reportedly occurred during her visit.

“Given the relatively small population size of people with albinism in Malawi – reported to be a little less than ten thousand – attacks against a few of them constitutes a danger to all of them,” she stressed.

“It is clear that an urgent and coordinated response from the Government, civil society and development partners working in strong partnership with each other is required,” she noted while stressing the principle of ‘nothing about us without us’, which includes the involvement of organizations of persons with albinism at every step, where the process cannot be led directly by them.

Ms. Ero welcomed the launching of the Government’s Response Plan of 2015 and commended its content. However, she noted, “the absence of resources attached to this plan has drastically delayed its implementation and such an emergency situation needs an emergency response.”

“Court sentences as handed down to convicted criminals do not always reflect the gravity of the crime,” she said. “As pointed out by various stakeholders during my visit, stealing a cow may attract a higher penalty.”

“The early return of suspects to their communities – whether due to the use of bail, fines or low judicial sentences – increases the fear in which persons with albinism live, sends a message of impunity to affected communities and increases the risks of mob killings,” she added.

The expert recommended “training for police, prosecutors and magistrates to increase knowledge of the current legislative framework applicable to these cases, cooperation between the police and the Department of Public Prosecutions,” as well as “adequate resources for the newly appointed special prosecutor.”

Ms. Ero pointed out that, although the amendment of relevant legislation is required, more immediate measures are also necessary such as a judicial direction that cases be handled only by professional magistrates and through the ongoing revision of the Sentencing Guidelines.

She also commended the protection measures adopted by community police and some traditional authorities as well as the support provided by communities to their members with albinism. “The quick intervention of neighbours during attacks has in various cases led to the rescue of persons with albinism and to the arrest of perpetrators,” she said.

“Addressing the root causes of attacks, in particular why they are happening, is indispensable to eradicating them. It is worrying to note that witchcraft beliefs and practices are widespread in Malawi, although often a taboo topic,” Ms. Ero stated.

“Malawians have been taken by surprise by the recent increase of attacks against persons with albinism,” she said. “Yet, discrimination against persons with albinism has a long history in the country and is well rooted in beliefs as well as harmful traditional and cultural practices, including that persons with albinism do not die but simply disappear, and the practice of infanticide at birth on the pretext that the baby was stillborn.”

The Independent Expert will produce a full report and recommendations to be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in March 2017.

(*) Check the Independent Expert’s full end-of-mission statement: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=19903&LangID=E

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Malawi: People with albinism face total extinction – UN Expert calls for urgent response

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

Malawi: People with albinism face total extinction – UN Expert calls for urgent response

The United Nations Independent Expert on the rights of persons with albinism, Ikponwosa Ero, today warned that the atrocities faced by persons with albinism in Malawi render them “an endangered people group facing a risk of systemic extinction over time if nothing is done.”

“Persons with albinism, and parents of children with albinism, constantly live in fear of attack. Many do not sleep peacefully and have deliberately restricted their movement to the necessary minimum,” the human rights expert said at the end of her first official visit* to Malawi.

“The frequent involvement of close relatives in cases of attacks is highly disturbing, and persons with albinism are unable to trust even those who are supposed to care for and protect them,” Ms. Ero noted. “Consequently, persons with albinism in the current context of attacks are locked in a spiral of fear and poverty.”

The UN Independent Expert described the situation as “an emergency, a crisis disturbing in its proportions.” According to the police, 65 cases have been recorded since late 2014, and at least two further critical incidents reportedly occurred during her visit.

“Given the relatively small population size of people with albinism in Malawi – reported to be a little less than ten thousand – attacks against a few of them constitutes a danger to all of them,” she stressed.

“It is clear that an urgent and coordinated response from the Government, civil society and development partners working in strong partnership with each other is required,” she noted while stressing the principle of ‘nothing about us without us’, which includes the involvement of organizations of persons with albinism at every step, where the process cannot be led directly by them.

Ms. Ero welcomed the launching of the Government’s Response Plan of 2015 and commended its content. However, she noted, “the absence of resources attached to this plan has drastically delayed its implementation and such an emergency situation needs an emergency response.”

“Court sentences as handed down to convicted criminals do not always reflect the gravity of the crime,” she said. “As pointed out by various stakeholders during my visit, stealing a cow may attract a higher penalty.”

“The early return of suspects to their communities – whether due to the use of bail, fines or low judicial sentences – increases the fear in which persons with albinism live, sends a message of impunity to affected communities and increases the risks of mob killings,” she added.

The expert recommended “training for police, prosecutors and magistrates to increase knowledge of the current legislative framework applicable to these cases, cooperation between the police and the Department of Public Prosecutions,” as well as “adequate resources for the newly appointed special prosecutor.”

Ms. Ero pointed out that, although the amendment of relevant legislation is required, more immediate measures are also necessary such as a judicial direction that cases be handled only by professional magistrates and through the ongoing revision of the Sentencing Guidelines.

She also commended the protection measures adopted by community police and some traditional authorities as well as the support provided by communities to their members with albinism. “The quick intervention of neighbours during attacks has in various cases led to the rescue of persons with albinism and to the arrest of perpetrators,” she said.

“Addressing the root causes of attacks, in particular why they are happening, is indispensable to eradicating them. It is worrying to note that witchcraft beliefs and practices are widespread in Malawi, although often a taboo topic,” Ms. Ero stated.

“Malawians have been taken by surprise by the recent increase of attacks against persons with albinism,” she said. “Yet, discrimination against persons with albinism has a long history in the country and is well rooted in beliefs as well as harmful traditional and cultural practices, including that persons with albinism do not die but simply disappear, and the practice of infanticide at birth on the pretext that the baby was stillborn.”

The Independent Expert will produce a full report and recommendations to be presented to the UN Human Rights Council in March 2017.

(*) Check the Independent Expert’s full end-of-mission statement: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=19903&LangID=E

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Malawi: People with albinism face total extinction – UN Expert calls for urgent response

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

East AfricaCom 2016 chooses APO as Official Newswire

Informa Telecoms & Media (http://www.Informatandm.com) has today announced that APO (http://www.APO-opa.com) will be the Official Newswire of East AfricaCom 2016, East Africa’s leading telecoms event (https://eaafrica.comworldseries.com), to be held in Nairobi, Kenya, on 18–19 May 2016.

East AfricaCom, the leading forum for high level networking across telecoms, broadcasting, enterprise ICT and the entire Digital Community in East Africa will distribute its press releases via Africa Wire®, the service for press release wire distribution and monitoring in Africa.

Used by some of the world’s largest technology companies, including, Facebook, Samsung, Orange, Ericsson, Tigo, Mahindra Comviva, Yahsat, Opera, MainOne, Kaspersky, and more, APO’s Africa Wire® has a potential reach of 600 million people and guarantees the most extensive outreach in Africa, acting as a channel that allows East AfricaCom to target audiences across East Africa and the rest of the continent.

This reaches over 150,000 journalists, bloggers and social networks, and redistributes content to more than 50 African websites, as well as to international partners such as Bloomberg Terminal, Thomson Reuters Terminal, Lexis Nexis and Dow Jones Factiva.

East AfricaCom will host a range of companies from across the telecoms industry including: Airtel, Ethiotelecom, Halotel MVNO, Orange Telkom, Millicom SA, Tigo Tanzania, MTN Congo, Safaricom, Tanzania Telecommunications Company, Tigo Rwanda, Uganda Telecom and Vodacom

Craig Lumsden, Marketing executive for AfricaCom, comments, “APO has been our Official Newswire for many years and I have always been impressed with the work they deliver. Their attitude is great, they deliver on time and the quality that they produce is superb. Thanks to APO’s mobile reach, all AfricaCom press releases will be made available to subscribers of MTN Group, Airtel, Orange and Tigo in over 30 countries, with a total reach of 250 million mobile users in Africa. We couldn’t ask for more!”

APO Founder and CEO, Nicolas Pompigne-Mognard, adds, “APO is delighted to have been named the Official Newswire for an event as prestigious as East AfricaCom. APO is particularly focused on reaching not only mainstream media but also industry-specific publications across Africa; this endorsement from East AfricaCom once again proves APO’s unrivalled capacity to reach the key media outlets in Africa.”

East Africa Com – 18 -19 May 2016 – http://eaafrica.comworldseries.com/
West Africa Com – 8 -9 June 2016 – http://westafrica.comworldseries.com/
NigeriaCom – 21 -22 September 2016 – http://nigeria.comworldseries.com/
AfricaCom – 15 -17 November 2016 – http://africa.comworldseries.com/

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of APO (African Press Organization).

Contact APO:
Aïssatou Diallo
bdm@apo-opa.org
+41 22 534 96 97

Contact East AfricaCom:
Craig Lumsden
Marketing Executive
Com World Series
Craig.Lumsden2@informa.com

About APO:
APO (www.APO-opa.com) is the sole press release newswire in Africa and is a global leader in media relations relating to Africa.
With offices in Senegal, Switzerland and Dubai, APO owns a media database of over 150,000 contacts and is the main online community for Africa-related news.
It offers a complete range of services, including press release distribution and monitoring, online press conferences, interactive webcasts, media interactions, strategic advice, public diplomacy, government relations and events promotion. To find out more, please visit Apo-opa.com.
Follow APO on Twitter: twitter.com/apo_source
Follow APO on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/african-press-organization
Follow APO on Facebook: facebook.com/africanpressorganization

About East AfricaCom
East AfricaCom (https://eaafrica.comworldseries.com) – the leading forum for high level networking across telecoms, broadcasting, enterprise ICT and the entire Digital Community in East Africa.

Media files

Download logo

Multimedia content

Source:: East AfricaCom 2016 chooses APO as Official Newswire

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

On Defending Democratic Space in the DRC

Press Statement

John Kirby
Assistant Secretary and Department Spokesperson, Bureau of Public Affairs

Washington, DC

April 28, 2016

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is experiencing a historic year that should – according to that country’s constitution – culminate in the DRC’s first democratic transfer of executive power. The United States supports the Congolese people in their pursuit of timely, free, and fair elections and underscores the importance of open political space to a credible electoral process.

We are deeply concerned by the government’s arrest and intimidation of Congolese citizens participating in and preparing for peaceful political activity in Kinshasa and Haut Katanga Province the weekend of April 24. The DRC government has, under its own constitution and its international human rights obligations, the responsibility to respect its citizens’ human rights including the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression. Repression destroys the trust and confidence of the very citizens who are needed for any credible dialogue amongst all Congolese stakeholders.

The United States underscores UN Security Council resolution 2277’s pronouncement that a peaceful and credible electoral cycle, in accordance with the constitution, is critical to the DRC’s long-term stabilization and consolidation of democracy. As Secretary Kerry told President Kabila recently, we stand ready to support those committed to such elections. The United States strongly believes that the Congolese people, free of fear, should shape the future of Congo.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Africa Regional Media Hub.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: On Defending Democratic Space in the DRC

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment

Statement Attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on South Sudan

The Secretary-General welcomes the appointment today by President Salva Kiir of the Ministers of the Transitional Government of National Unity, consistent with the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan of 17 August 2015. He is pleased to note that President Kiir and First Vice-President Riek Machar have achieved this important milestone of the peace process and urges them to swiftly complete the establishment of all institutions of transition. He also urges the parties to cease immediately all hostilities.

The Secretary-General commends the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission (JMEC) chair, President Festus Mogae, and the African Union High Representative, President Alpha Omar Konare, for steering the peace process forward, and reiterates the commitment of the United Nations to support all South Sudanese in restoring peace, stability and prosperity in the country. He calls on the larger international community to remain actively engaged in the peace process and provide the necessary support to the full and timely implementation of the Peace Agreement.

New York, 28 April

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of United Nations – Office of the Spokesperson for the Secretary-General.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Statement Attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on South Sudan

Categories: AFRICA | Leave a comment