African Union Commission and OECD Development Centre call for tapping immigrants’ contribution to Africa’s economic transformation

The perceptions that international migration is first and foremost a South-North phenomenon and that immigrants cost more than they yield is widespread. Yet about eight out of ten African migrants leave for another African country. Their impact on the economies of host countries is generally positive though limited. At the same time, Africa’s population is set to double by 2050, bringing 26 million additional young people into the labour force each year. Ambitious and effective policies for labour markets, education and skills, health, fertility, food security and access to financial services will be key to creating enough decent jobs and reap a demographic dividend, while maximising the positive contribution of immigrants to Africa.

These topics were at the heart of the joint press conference held today (January 29, 2018) by senior Officials from the African Union Commission (AUC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on the side-lines of the 30th African Union Summit held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“The African Union’s Agenda 2063 provides an ambitious, continental vision of inclusive economic transformation. We support the Commission in its implementation both at regional and national levels. Addressing the interrelations between migration and other public policies is key to unleashing the continent’s potential for economic transformation”, said Mario Pezzini, Director of the OECD Development Centre and Special Advisor to the OECD Secretary General on Development.

The media event built on the research on Migration and Development conducted by the OECD Development Centre in around 30 countries worldwide, including seven African countries; and the conclusions of the recently published OECD Development Centre-ILO How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies report. The discussion highlighted the importance of intra-African migration and of immigrants’ contribution to their African host country in three areas: labour market, economic growth and public finance.

Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the report presents numerous instances of immigrants’ positive economic contributions in African countries. For example, in Côte d’Ivoire, immigrants paid more than half a percent of GDP more in taxes and contributions than they generated in additional fiscal costs in 2008. In Ghana, wages of native-born workers who live in areas where there is a higher concentration of foreign-born workers with similar skills appear to be higher than elsewhere in the country. In Rwanda, immigrants contribute more than 2.5 as much to value added as their share in the workforce would suggest and in South Africa, the rate of workers who are employers is almost 50% more elevated than among native-born workers.

“Drawing on its unique membership of African and other emerging economies, the OECD Development Centre has been providing analytical and comparative policy expertise and dialogue platforms – at the global, regional and national levels – to support the development of better policies for better lives.”, said Victor Harison, Commissioner of Economic Affairs of the AUC.

Building on their longstanding co-operation, and with a view to deepening high-level dialogue and co-operation on a citizen-driven pan-African agenda of integration and transformation, the AUC and the OECD Development Centre announced the launch of their forthcoming joint report Dynamic of African Economies (DAE). Other joint high profile projects include notably the yearly International Economic Forum on Africa and Revenue Statistics in Africa.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

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African Union Commission and OECD Development Centre call for tapping immigrants’ contribution to Africa’s economic transformation

The perceptions that international migration is first and foremost a South-North phenomenon and that immigrants cost more than they yield is widespread. Yet about eight out of ten African migrants leave for another African country. Their impact on the economies of host countries is generally positive though limited. At the same time, Africa’s population is set to double by 2050, bringing 26 million additional young people into the labour force each year. Ambitious and effective policies for labour markets, education and skills, health, fertility, food security and access to financial services will be key to creating enough decent jobs and reap a demographic dividend, while maximising the positive contribution of immigrants to Africa.

These topics were at the heart of the joint press conference held today (January 29, 2018) by senior Officials from the African Union Commission (AUC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on the side-lines of the 30th African Union Summit held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“The African Union’s Agenda 2063 provides an ambitious, continental vision of inclusive economic transformation. We support the Commission in its implementation both at regional and national levels. Addressing the interrelations between migration and other public policies is key to unleashing the continent’s potential for economic transformation”, said Mario Pezzini, Director of the OECD Development Centre and Special Advisor to the OECD Secretary General on Development.

The media event built on the research on Migration and Development conducted by the OECD Development Centre in around 30 countries worldwide, including seven African countries; and the conclusions of the recently published OECD Development Centre-ILO How Immigrants Contribute to Developing Countries’ Economies report. The discussion highlighted the importance of intra-African migration and of immigrants’ contribution to their African host country in three areas: labour market, economic growth and public finance.

Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, the report presents numerous instances of immigrants’ positive economic contributions in African countries. For example, in Côte d’Ivoire, immigrants paid more than half a percent of GDP more in taxes and contributions than they generated in additional fiscal costs in 2008. In Ghana, wages of native-born workers who live in areas where there is a higher concentration of foreign-born workers with similar skills appear to be higher than elsewhere in the country. In Rwanda, immigrants contribute more than 2.5 as much to value added as their share in the workforce would suggest and in South Africa, the rate of workers who are employers is almost 50% more elevated than among native-born workers.

“Drawing on its unique membership of African and other emerging economies, the OECD Development Centre has been providing analytical and comparative policy expertise and dialogue platforms – at the global, regional and national levels – to support the development of better policies for better lives.”, said Victor Harison, Commissioner of Economic Affairs of the AUC.

Building on their longstanding co-operation, and with a view to deepening high-level dialogue and co-operation on a citizen-driven pan-African agenda of integration and transformation, the AUC and the OECD Development Centre announced the launch of their forthcoming joint report Dynamic of African Economies (DAE). Other joint high profile projects include notably the yearly International Economic Forum on Africa and Revenue Statistics in Africa.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

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Africa Business and Investment Forum set for Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

A high level public- private sector dialogue on ways of supporting and promoting private-sector-led growth in Africa will take place today, 30 January in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The African Business and Investment Forum will serve as a platform for African and U.S. private sector executives to share insights with African heads of state, ministers, senior USG officials, representatives of multilateral institutions and other stakeholders.

The one-day Forum will feature roundtable discussions on issues related to trade and diversification, energy, agribusiness, and health. This will ensure that private sector voices and views are heard by leaders and key stakeholders, and that the day-to-day challenges faced by private sector operators in Africa are addressed.

Among the more than 150 expected participants are Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn of Ethiopia; President Nana Akufo-Addo of Ghana; President Filipe Nyusi of Mozambique; President Paul Kagame of Rwanda; President Macky Sall of Senegal; President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda; President Mahamadou Issoufou of Niger; and President João Lourenço of Angola. CEOs and senior executives of key U.S and African companies, both multinationals and SMEs will also attend.

In addition to providing a platform for a high-level public-private sector dialogue, the objectives of the Forum are to increase opportunities for business partnerships, secure commitments as well as track the adoption of business-friendly policies, and showcase countries and policies that are contributing to an enabling environment for enhanced African regional and global trade and investment, including with the United States.

The Africa Business and Investment Forum is organized by the Corporate Council on Africa (CCA) in partnership with the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA). ECA’s Executive Secretary, Vera Songwe, and CCA’s President and CEO, Florizelle Liser, will be representing the two organizing institutions at the event.

CCA, as the premier U.S. business association solely focused on promoting U.S.-Africa trade, investment and business engagement, will bring its 23-year expertise of successfully providing insights, connections and access critical to U.S. and African businesses operating on the continent.

ECA provides a unique platform for intermediation between the public and the private sector policies and programs, offering solutions and support to accelerate sustainable private sector development on the continent.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA).

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Greenpeace Africa’s Executive Director Wins a Prestigious Human Rights Award

Greenpeace Africa’s (www.Greenpeace.org/africa) Executive Director, Njeri Kabeberi, has won the 2017 Munir Mazrui ‘Lifetime Achievement Human Rights Defenders Award’ in a ceremony organised by the National Coalition of Human Rights Defenders (NCHRD-K) at the Royal Netherlands embassy in Nairobi, Kenya. This is one of three categories of Human Rights Defenders (HRD) Awards launched in 2016 to recognise and honour the work of human rights defenders in Kenya.

NCHRD-K is a national organization that promotes the safety and security of human rights defenders in Kenya through advocacy, capacity building and protection. It works in partnership with a Working Group on the Protection of Human Rights Defenders, chaired by the Royal Netherlands Embassy.

Announcing the award, Kamau Ngugi, Executive Director of the HRDs coalition in Kenya said:

“Njeri is a selfless Woman Human Rights Defender who has broken chains of patriarchy to lead successful campaigns for justice, good governance and human rights in Kenya and beyond. Njeri has mentored many and her recent advances in the environmental protection crowns her lifelong commitment to human rights promotion and protection that deserves recognition and celebration.”

Upon receiving the award, Njeri Kabeberi said she was humbled and honoured.

“Despite having received a number of International Awards this is the first time I have been recognised in my own country – and since it is said that a ‘prophet is never recognised in their own home’, this then becomes the biggest victory and the sweetest award to date.”

“Human rights defenders’ work is lonely and hardly appreciated but I know that focus, persistence and resilience always cause the desired impact. We earn our freedom when we learn to face fear head on; that is what others call courage” continued Ms. Kabeberi.

Njeri’s activism career spans over three decades; as a young girl in 1982, she quietly began supporting mothers and wives of political prisoners but her human rights work was only thrown into limelight a decade later when she was invited to the late Prof. Wangari Maathai’s house to join the organization of the campaign to release Kenyan political prisoners.

With this long history in human rights activism, Njeri is now leading Greenpeace Africa into a new wave of environmental justice for Africans by Africans. Human rights is inextricably linked to climate change.

“If we won the human rights and governance battle, but lost our planet, we would have lost everything.”

“My current vision is to build an Environmental Movement in Africa so powerful that African citizens begin to take responsibility for their future. This can be achieved by restoring the continent through green pathways and seeking global environmental justice to mitigate climate change impacts” concluded Kabeberi.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Greenpeace.

Media Contact:
Hellen Dena, Communication Officer, HDena@Greenpeace.org Mobile: + 254 708 056 207

Source:: Greenpeace Africa’s Executive Director Wins a Prestigious Human Rights Award

      

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