IMF Launches Somalia Trust Fund for Capacity Development

MOGADISHU, Somalia, March 10, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The International Monetary Fund (IMF) on February 5, 2015 launched a multi-donor trust fund to deliver capacity development in Somalia. The Somalia Trust Fund aims at improving macroeconomic institutions, policies, and data systems and will provide over nine (9) million dollars worth of technical assistance and training to Somalia over the next three years.

So far, commitments have been received from the Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development ($3 million), the Canadian Department for Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development ($2.5 million), and the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development ($1.1 million). The IMF is continuing its efforts to secure additional contributions to fully finance the Trust Fund’s budget.

The inaugural meeting of the Steering Committee, the Trust Fund’s governing body on February 5, 2015 endorsed the work plans in three areas of the IMF’s expertise: fiscal operations, central banking, and statistical systems. Capacity development in these areas will be provided by the IMF’s Fiscal Affairs Department, Monetary and Capital Markets Department, and Statistics Department. The IMF’s Legal Department will produce additional work plans on anti-money laundering and fiscal legislation over the coming year.

The Steering Committee comprises representatives of the Federal Government of Somalia, the IMF, and donors to the Trust Fund. Representatives of the European Union and Turkey also attended the inaugural meeting as observers. The Steering Committee endorsed the selection of Canada as the Chair for 2015.

Background Information

Somalia is emerging from a long period of civil war that has lasted for a generation. In the August 2012, a 275-member Federal Parliament was elected by traditional elders from across the regions and districts of Somalia. The Federal Parliament in turn elected Mr. Hassan Sheikh Mohamud as Federal President and Head of the Federal Government of Somalia. In the wake of broad international support, the IMF announced in April 2013 that it also recognized the Federal Government of Somalia as the government of Somalia. This has allowed the IMF to resume the provision of technical assistance and capacity development to Somalia.

It has been recognized that the delivery of capacity development to meet Somalia’s vast needs requires a long-term approach. Such an approach also needs to be well coordinated with other technical assistance providers—not only to avoid duplication of efforts, but also to ensure that contributions made are complementary. To this end, the IMF proposed in mid-2014 the establishment of a multi-donor Trust Fund to ensure a sustained delivery of capacity development to Somalia. Its focus is to support the Somali authorities’ efforts to build key economic institutions and develop capacity for prudent macroeconomic policies. It also provides a forum to coordinate ongoing efforts with, and among, donors and other technical assistance providers.

Building on the IMF’s long experience in fragile and post-conflict countries, the capacity development program for Somalia under the Trust Fund will comprise technical assistance, training, and professional attachments of Somali officials in counterpart institutions in other countries in the region.

Source:: IMF Launches Somalia Trust Fund for Capacity Development

Categories: African Press Organization

Statement at the End of an IMF Staff Visit to Conduct the First Review of Zimbabwe’s Staff-Monitored Program

HARARE, Zimbabwe, March 10, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — An International Monetary Fund (IMF) mission led by Domenico Fanizza visited Harare from February 25 to March 9, 2015 to conduct the first review under the 15-month Staff Monitored Program (SMP) approved by Management in November 2014 (see Press Release No. 14/504). The mission reached a staff-level agreement on policies for the completion of the first review. A report will be submitted for IMF Management approval in April 2015. At the conclusion of the visit, Mr. Fanizza issued the following statement:

“Despite substantial economic and financial difficulties, the authorities have made progress in implementing their reform program, meeting all quantitative targets and structural benchmarks for the first review under the SMP. Moreover, they have stepped up reengagement with creditors by raising payments to the World Bank and by developing a roadmap to seek debt rescheduling under the umbrella of the Paris Club. These developments constitute important steps toward reengaging with the international financial institutions. The mission welcomes the actions to restore confidence in the financial sector, and the progress to clarify the indigenization laws, which were modified in January. In February, in light of improvements in the regime for anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT), the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) removed Zimbabwe from the list of countries subject to the FATF monitoring process.

“Economic prospects remain difficult. Growth has slowed, and we expect it to weaken further in 2015. Despite the favorable impact of lower oil prices, the external position remains precarious, and the country is in debt distress. The authorities are committed to intensifying their efforts to lay the ground for stronger, more inclusive and lasting economic growth. Their resolve to reengage with the international financial community and to seek its support for the reform process is encouraging. The policy reform agenda consists of the following major areas:

Balancing the primary fiscal accounts. The commitment to eliminate the primary fiscal deficit reaffirms Zimbabwe’s intention to further raise its capacity to repay. The top priority is to move resources from a too high wage bill to much-needed capital and social spending. To this purpose the authorities intend to work toward reducing the share of revenues absorbed by the wage bill. In addition, by amending the Public Finance Management and the Procurement Acts, they will seek to increase accountability, transparency and efficiency in the use of public resources. The reform of the tax regime for the mining sector could go a long way to mobilizing additional resources, and continuing to publish audited financial accounts of the mining companies will enhance transparency.

Restoring confidence in Zimbabwe’s financial sector. A sound operational framework for the Zimbabwe Asset Management Company (ZAMCO) is key to freeing the banking system from the burden of high nonperforming loans that limit the banks’ ability to extend credit to the private sector and keep the cost of credit high. Moreover, completing the recapitalization of the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ) will enhance its ability to supervise the banking sector.

Improving the investment climate. The authorities plan to publish on the website of the Zimbabwe Investment Authority a simplified summary of the Indigenization and Economic Empowerment Laws. In addition, they are reviewing the 1985 Labor Relations Act to adapt it to the competitiveness challenges arising from a fast-changing global environment.

Garnering support for a strategy to clear arrears with multilateral institutions. The authorities plan to step up their efforts to build consensus among all development partners on ways to address these arrears.

“During this visit, the mission met with Mr. P. A. Chinamasa, Minister of Finance and Economic Development (MoFED), Dr. M. J. M. Sibanda, Chief Secretary to the President’s Office and Cabinet, Dr. J. P. Mangudya, Governor of the RBZ, other senior government officials, and representatives of the private sector, civil society and development partners. The team wishes to thank the authorities and the staff of the MoFED and the RBZ for their hospitality and collaboration.”

Source:: Statement at the End of an IMF Staff Visit to Conduct the First Review of Zimbabwe’s Staff-Monitored Program

Categories: African Press Organization

FY 2015 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Uganda, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo

WASHINGTON, March 9, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

March 5, 2015

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-15-009

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Thursday, March 5, 2015

Proposal submission deadline: Monday, April 6, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) Proposed activities should primarily support refugees in Uganda, Tanzania (Nyarugusu Camp), and Democratic Republic of the Congo (Equateur Province) as outlined below. All proposals should target beneficiaries as identified in collaboration with UNHCR and local authorities.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50% refugees. Activities should be implemented in close collaboration with UNHCR and local authorities.

Country-specific Provisions:

Uganda

(c) Proposals must focus on assistance to either refugee settlements OR to urban refugee communities.

(d) For proposed activities in Uganda’s settlements, at least 80% of beneficiaries must be refugees with the remainder, if any, being vulnerable individuals in host communities. Proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Life-saving basic preventative and curative healthcare assistance

(ii) Protection and gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response targeting vulnerable groups, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) individuals

(iii) Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH)

(iv) Peacebuilding and conflict resolution, including information sharing, promotion of social cohesion, and/or conflict sensitivity activities

(v) Livelihoods, including vocational training/education

(e) For proposed activities in urban settings, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50% refugees to allow PRM-funded programs in urban areas to pursue a community-based approach that also benefits host communities, wherever possible. Proposals may focus on the following areas of intervention:

(i) Protection and gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response targeting vulnerable groups, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) individuals

(ii) Livelihoods, including vocational training/education

Tanzania

(f) Proposals must focus on the following sector in the Nyarugusu refugee camp in western Tanzania:

(i) Life-saving basic preventative and curative healthcare assistance, including prevention of and response to gender-based violence

Democratic Republic of Congo

(g) Proposals must focus on Equateur Province, specifically on areas receiving new refugees from the Central African Republic (CAR). Proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Water, sanitation, hygiene (WASH)

(ii) Protection and gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response, including psychosocial support and assistance to vulnerable refugees

(iii) Peacebuilding and conflict resolution, including information sharing, promotion of social cohesion, and/or conflict sensitivity activities

(iv) Livelihoods, including vocational training/education

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: June 1 – September 15 2015

Duration of Activity: Program plans for 12, 24, or 36 months will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed 36 months from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed 12 months in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals for Uganda and the DRC must not be more than $1,000,000 or they will be disqualified.

Project proposals for Tanzania must not be more than $500,000 or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including new guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively. NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template, section 3a) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). A gender analysis is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR, current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities and/or overall country program (this letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of and sensitivity to conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators:

Health: Proposals focusing on health in camp based/returnee settings must include a minimum of one of the four following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Number of consultations/clinician/day (Target: Fewer than 50 patients per clinician per day).

• Measles vaccination rate for children under five (Target: 95% coverage).

• Percentage of deliveries attended by a skilled birth attendant in a health care facility (Target: 100%).

• Percentage of reporting rape survivors given post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with 72 hours (Target: 100%).

Proposals focusing on health in urban/non-camp settings must include a minimum of one of the six following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Capacity-building: number of health care professionals/administrators trained on providing health services to beneficiary populations.

• Referrals: number of beneficiaries referred to appropriate services, and percentage of those referred who were able to get needed services.

• Community Outreach: number of beneficiaries who received targeted messages on their rights and health-related services available to them.

• Health Staffing: number of total consultations per health care provider, disaggregated by refugee/national, sex, and age.

• Patient Satisfaction: percentage of beneficiary patients receiving primary and emergency care who express satisfaction with services received.

• Post Exposure Prophylaxis: percentage of reporting beneficiary rape survivors given PEP within 72 hours (Target: 100%).

NGO proposals seeking to fund service provision may include the following indicators as appropriate:

• Primary Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving primary health care assistance.

• Emergency Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving care for trauma or sudden illness.

Proposals should include custom health indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Health

• Sphere Handbook: http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook/

• UNHCR Health Guidelines, Policies, and Strategies: http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49c3646cdd.html

• OFDA NGO Guidance (pages 96-110): http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1866/guidelines_for_proposals_2012.pdf

Livelihoods: Proposals focusing on livelihoods in camp based/returnee settings must include a minimum of one of the three following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

• (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

Proposals focusing on livelihoods in urban/non-camp settings must include a minimum of one of the eight following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) in urban settings who are placed in jobs by completion of the project period. Note: A chart should be provided reflecting the length of employment for program participants.

• (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

• The percentage of sampled host community employers who are able to identify at least two skill-sets (e.g., carpentry, embroidery) among program beneficiaries living in their municipality.

• The percentage of sampled host community employers who are able to describe accurately the procedures for hiring program beneficiaries.

• The percentage of sampled urban program beneficiaries who:

o Are able to describe accurately the procedures for receiving permits to conduct business.

o Apply for and receive for business permits.

• The percentage of sampled urban program beneficiaries who are economically self-reliant, as measured by self-reporting of household consumption and income sources.

Proposals should include custom livelihoods indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Livelihoods

• USAID/OFDA Guidelines for Proposals, October 2012 (pgs. 82-96)

• Women’s Refugee Commission, Preventing Gender Based Violence, Building Livelihoods: Guidance and Tools for Improved Programming

• Minimum Economic Recovery Standards, 2nd ed. Washington, DC, USA: The SEEP Network, 2010. http://communities.seepnetwork.org/econrecovery

• Emergency Market Mapping and Analysis Toolkit. (EMMA) Practical Action Publishing. 2010. www.emmatoolkit.info (In French as of 2011.)

• Local Economic Recovery in Post-Conflict: Guidelines. Geneva: ILO, 2010.

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/documents/instructionalmaterial/wcms_141270.pdf

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements (http://test.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html).

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). To register with Grants.gov, organizations must first receive a Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number and register with the System for Award Management (SAM) at www.sam.gov which can take weeks and sometimes months. We recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) To register with Grants.gov, organizations must 1) receive a DUNS number; 2) register with the System for Award Management (SAM); 3) register with Grants.gov; and 4) designate points of contact and authorized organization representatives in Grants.gov. Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive an NCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov.

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found at: https://www.statebuy.state.gov/fa/Documents/Listofoverseascertsandassurances.pdf.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Thursday, March 5, 2015

Proposal submission deadline: Monday, April 6, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

Content and Formatting

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates. Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2014 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in 12-month cycles for a period not to exceed 36 months from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. These can be updated yearly upon submission of continuation applications. Applicants should note that they may use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for this application, which is different from the single year template. Multi-year funding applicants may also use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 30 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 25 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in 12- month increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Continuation applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Continuation applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late continuation applications will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request multi-year funding and continuation application templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

(f) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Subrecipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the subrecipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Capacity Building

(vi) Coordination with other Stakeholders

(vii) Transition Plan

(viii) Management Capacity

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format available at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/OMB/grants/approved_forms/sf-ppr.pdf. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to PRMNGOCoordinator@state.gov.

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on the HHS/PMS website at http://www.dpm.psc.gov/grant_recipient/ffr_info/ffr_info.aspx.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

Acting PRM Program Officer: Lin’An Bartlett (BartlettL@stat.gov); (202) 453-9379; Washington, D.C.

Regional Refugee Coordinator: Josh Fischel (FischelJ@state.gov); +256-414-306001 ext. 6519; U.S. Embassy Kampala.

Source:: FY 2015 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Uganda, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo

Categories: African Press Organization

UN human rights expert meets with Eritrean refugees and migrants in Belgium

GENEVA, Switzerland, March 9, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Eritrea, Sheila B. Keetharuth, today started an official visit to Belgium (9-11 March) to collect first-hand information from Eritrean refugees and migrants on the human rights situation in Eritrea.

Since 2014, Ms. Keetharuth has carried out similar information-gathering missions to Djibouti, Ethiopia, Germany, Italy, Malta and Tunisia.

“Due to lack of access to Eritrea,” she said, “I have been engaging with Eritrean refugees and migrants outside of their home country, and all others concerned by human rights in Eritrea, including those who consider themselves to be victims of alleged human rights violations, human rights defenders and other civil society actors.”

The human rights expert has made several official requests to visit Eritrea since her appointment in November 2012, which have so far not been granted. She has repeatedly urged the Eritrean authorities to cooperate with her mandate in order to address the country’s human rights challenges.

During her mission, Ms. Keetharuth will interview Eritrean refugees and migrants about the situation of human rights in Eritrea to corroborate allegations of widespread and systematic violations of human rights in Eritrea contained in reports she has received from different sources.

Ms. Keetharuth expressed her appreciation that Belgium has agreed to provide her with access to interview the Eritrean refugees and migrants residing in the country.

The result of her findings, which will be strictly limited to the situation inside Eritrea, will be reflected in her third report to the Human Rights Council in June 2015.

Source:: UN human rights expert meets with Eritrean refugees and migrants in Belgium

Categories: African Press Organization

Making SSA Countries More Resilient to External Shocks: A Presidential Lecture at the IMF’s Africa Training Institute in Mauritius Concludes

PORT-LOUIS, Mauritius, March 9, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — At the first annual Presidential Lecture Series of the institute on March 3, Mauritian President Rajkeswur Purryag and IMF African Department Director Antoinette Sayeh emphasized the importance of economic policies that would make sub-Saharan Africa countries more resilient to external shocks, while ensuring the continuation of programs of economic development, structural transformation, job creation, and poverty reduction.

The lecture aimed to bring together policymakers from frontier emerging market countries (Gabon, Ghana, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritius, Nigeria, Swaziland, and Zambia) to discuss relevant economic issues.

University of Chile Professor and former Governor of the Central Bank of Chile José De Gregorio noted in his lecture that frontier and emerging market countries face several key challenges, including volatile capital flows, declining commodity prices, and an asynchronous exit from unconventional monetary policy.

Participants discussed a range of issues, including foreign exchange intervention policy, benefits of and pre-conditions for greater exchange rate flexibility, select aspects of prudential regulation and supervision, and transmission mechanisms of monetary policy in under developed financial market.

The Presidential Lecture followed a high-level conference on capital flows jointly organized by the IMF’s Research Department and the Africa Training Institute in Mauritius, on March 2, 2015.

Source:: Making SSA Countries More Resilient to External Shocks: A Presidential Lecture at the IMF’s Africa Training Institute in Mauritius Concludes

Categories: African Press Organization

Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Staff Visit to Togo

LOME, Togo, March 9, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — A staff team of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) led by Cemile Sancak visited Lomé during February 27-March 5, 2015. The team met with the highest authorities, including the President of the Republic, to discuss economic policy priorities with senior government officials and the donor community, and assess macroeconomic developments.

At the conclusion of the staff visit, Ms. Sancak issued the following statement:

“Economic growth remained strong at around 5 percent while inflation was close to zero in 2014. Economic activity is expected to increase moderately to 5 ½ percent in 2015 as major transportation projects and the clinker factory come on stream.

“The mission and the authorities had constructive discussions on the key reform priorities that would help achieve sustainable and inclusive growth, while maintaining macroeconomic stability. IMF staff expressed the institution’s willingness to continue supporting the government’s reform priorities, including on revenue administration and public financial management. The mission also discussed with the authorities the plans to conduct the Article IV consultation scheduled for mid-2015.”

Source:: Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Staff Visit to Togo

Categories: African Press Organization