GNPC Operating Services Company (“GOSCO”) and Lloyd’s Register to deliver services to Ghana

Lloyd’s Register has signed an agreement with GOSCO, to form a joint venture dedicated to providing well project management, well engineering and associated site survey, geotechnical and rig inspection services, in the territorial waters of the Republic of Ghana.

The aim of the joint venture company, known as ‘Lloyd’s Register Wells Ghana Limited’, is to make available world-class engineering and operations, risk management and performance solutions to support operators deliver safe, cost-effective and compliant E&P activity.

Matt Rothnie, Vice-President for the Wells business at Lloyd’s Register, says: “We have joined forces with GOSCO to set up this joint venture as a response to growing industry interest in Ghana’s oil and gas potential along with the requirement to build capability in the Ghanaian E&P sector. This move is another example of Lloyd’s Register’s strategy to work in partnership with local oil and gas players to benefit from their local experience whilst providing the benefit of Lloyd’s Register’s global knowledge and technical expertise.” The new joint venture will be an indigenous Ghanaian company and based in Accra.

The potential impact of new discoveries on the Ghanaian economy has led to phenomenal interest in Ghana’s petroleum sector both locally and internationally. Amidst the excitement, the key development objective of the government of Ghana remains focused on the growth of the economy to accelerate development and industrialization; the oil and gas industry is proven to contribute significantly to strong growth in producing countries.

However, the discovery of oil in commercial quantities poses a number of challenges that must be addressed. Key of which is the need to establish a robust regulatory framework and institutional capacity in key areas of governance for effective management and oversight of the sector. This is because prudent management and policing of the sector has a significant impact on socio-economic development.

Rothnie highlights: “We believe this joint venture will create good long-term opportunities for Ghana’s E&P industry as we look to collectively achieve the highest levels of safety and performance providing the very latest ‘know-how’ and application of technology for well operations.”

Michael Amoah, CFO of GOSCO says: “We are very pleased to have formed our joint venture with Lloyds Register; we see real opportunities in key aspects of the upstream value chain for joint ventures which bring together the operational experience of Ghanaian companies with the niche high quality skills of an international partner.”

Scottish Development International, the Scottish government’s international arm, helped Lloyd’s Register in the joint venture development.

Gary Soper, Africa Regional Manager for Scottish Development International says: “Working from our West Africa hub in Accra, Ghana, we are well placed to introduce West African companies to Scotland’s oil and gas supply chain to access collaborative opportunities in the region. We are very pleased to see Lloyd’s Register forge this relationship with GOSCO in Ghana and help to develop their plans for current and future African oil and gas fields. Lloyd’s Register has a long tradition and experience in resolving and sharing solutions to complex commercial situations that can only help to bring benefits to the emerging oil and gas markets across the continent, especially at this critical time of low oil prices and the need for quality, independent cost-effective safety and performance solutions.

Distributed by APO on behalf of United Kingdom Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

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Source:: GNPC Operating Services Company (“GOSCO”) and Lloyd’s Register to deliver services to Ghana

      

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Regional industrialisation: when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts

Between 1992 and 2013, Uganda reduced the proportion of people living in poverty by over half and has registered a strong growth performance, accompanied by a rapid reduction in poverty rates. However, the country’s economic growth has not been sufficiently inclusive and did not generate enough job opportunities for the young and rapidly growing population.

The UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) argues that Uganda, like other African countries, needs to foster a higher level of industrial development to drive its economic transformation.

Speaking at a High-Level Policy Dialogue on promoting sustainable industrialisation in Uganda, Andrew Mold, the acting Director of ECA in Eastern Africa said that a sub-regional approach to industrial development is likely to result in a significantly faster rate of industrialisation than would be the case if the process is undertaken on an individual country-by-country basis.

The Kampala High-Level meeting discussed the need to draw lessons from high income as well as low-income countries that have successfully adopted industrialisation strategies. Dr. Arkebe Oqubay, the Minister and Special Advisor to the Ethiopian Prime Minister, who delivered a keynote address, showcased the example of Ethiopia, emphasizing the need to invest more in modernizing agriculture.

“If the growth has to be inclusive, it has to focus on the sector where a large part of the population is. That is agriculture”, said Oqubay .

In his address, the Prime Minister of Uganda, Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda said that such dialogue provides an opportunity for sharing experiences for enhancing Ugandan industrialisation efforts. “Uganda is ready to listen from the experts and to realise the promises of green growth”, he said.

Mold explained that the building of robust regional markets in Africa could unlock the manufacturing potential of Eastern Africa: “Countries such as Uganda can target the regional markets of the five countries of East African Community (EAC) as buyers of its manufactured products, as well as providers of inputs for its own production”, Mold told the participants.

The EAC Industrial Policy (2012) is supportive of a market-based approach rather than state interventionism, focusing on a few strategic subsectors: agro-processing, agro-chemicals, mineral processing, pharmaceuticals, petro-chemicals and bio-fuels. Those sectors could be developed through intra-regional investments to promote the emergence of regional value-chains.

Uganda’s manufacturing sector today plays a limited role in the economy. Recent growth in the economy at large has been concentrated in the service sector. Over the period 2000-2014, manufacturing’s contribution to GDP growth amounted to just 8 percent, compared to 30 percent related to the service sector. “The lack of dynamism in the manufacturing sector is a common problem across Africa,” said Mold.

Distributed by APO on behalf of United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).

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Source:: Regional industrialisation: when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts

      

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Regional industrialisation: when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts

Between 1992 and 2013, Uganda reduced the proportion of people living in poverty by over half and has registered a strong growth performance, accompanied by a rapid reduction in poverty rates. However, the country’s economic growth has not been sufficiently inclusive and did not generate enough job opportunities for the young and rapidly growing population.

The UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) argues that Uganda, like other African countries, needs to foster a higher level of industrial development to drive its economic transformation.

Speaking at a High-Level Policy Dialogue on promoting sustainable industrialisation in Uganda, Andrew Mold, the acting Director of ECA in Eastern Africa said that a sub-regional approach to industrial development is likely to result in a significantly faster rate of industrialisation than would be the case if the process is undertaken on an individual country-by-country basis.

The Kampala High-Level meeting discussed the need to draw lessons from high income as well as low-income countries that have successfully adopted industrialisation strategies. Dr. Arkebe Oqubay, the Minister and Special Advisor to the Ethiopian Prime Minister, who delivered a keynote address, showcased the example of Ethiopia, emphasizing the need to invest more in modernizing agriculture.

“If the growth has to be inclusive, it has to focus on the sector where a large part of the population is. That is agriculture”, said Oqubay .

In his address, the Prime Minister of Uganda, Dr. Ruhakana Rugunda said that such dialogue provides an opportunity for sharing experiences for enhancing Ugandan industrialisation efforts. “Uganda is ready to listen from the experts and to realise the promises of green growth”, he said.

Mold explained that the building of robust regional markets in Africa could unlock the manufacturing potential of Eastern Africa: “Countries such as Uganda can target the regional markets of the five countries of East African Community (EAC) as buyers of its manufactured products, as well as providers of inputs for its own production”, Mold told the participants.

The EAC Industrial Policy (2012) is supportive of a market-based approach rather than state interventionism, focusing on a few strategic subsectors: agro-processing, agro-chemicals, mineral processing, pharmaceuticals, petro-chemicals and bio-fuels. Those sectors could be developed through intra-regional investments to promote the emergence of regional value-chains.

Uganda’s manufacturing sector today plays a limited role in the economy. Recent growth in the economy at large has been concentrated in the service sector. Over the period 2000-2014, manufacturing’s contribution to GDP growth amounted to just 8 percent, compared to 30 percent related to the service sector. “The lack of dynamism in the manufacturing sector is a common problem across Africa,” said Mold.

Distributed by APO on behalf of United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).

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Source:: Regional industrialisation: when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts

      

Civilians pay the price of renewed, brutal fighting in the Central African Republic

As conflict spreads and intensifies in the Central African Republic (CAR), dozens of civilians are being killed and wounded. Thousands are being forced to flee for their lives and are receiving little to no humanitarian assistance, the international medical humanitarian organisation Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned today.

“Our teams have witnessed summary executions and have found mutilated bodies left exposed to terrorise populations. Civilians are traumatised and many have fled to the bush where they are surviving on whatever they can find”, says René Colgo, MSF’s deputy head of mission. He has been leading the team providing medical care in the areas of Bakouma and Nzako since 26 March.

In the past few months, in-fighting among parties from the 2014–2015 conflict has resulted in splinter groups and has triggered a conflict for control of territory and resources, especially in the centre and east of the country (Ouaka, Haute Kotto, Basse Kotto and Mbomou prefectures). When cities change hands, civilians are the first to suffer. In Bria paediatric hospital, for example, MSF teams have treated 168 people for violence-related injuries since November.

“During the weekend of 24 to 26 March our paediatric ward received around 24 badly injured people. Among them was a three-year-old girl who had a gunshot wound. It was chaos, and I remember having to leave one wounded man because I needed to urgently focus on another who just arrived with his intestines hanging out. We had limited technical equipment, but our surgeon managed to save his life”, says Dr Katie Treble, who was working for MSF in Bria hospital at the time.

The conflict is spreading to areas that had been considered relatively stable for the past two years. In Bakouma and Nzako (Mbomou province), towns and mining areas are being contested by rival armed groups, with devastating consequences for the civilian population.

“What was already one of the most acute humanitarian crises in the world is worsening. The Central African Republic is spiralling into levels of violence that have not seen since the peak of the conflict in 2014”, says Emmanuel Lampaert, MSF’s representative in CAR.

In recent months there has also been an increase in the number of targeted attacks by armed groups against specific communities, which in turn leads to retaliation and a quick escalation of violence. “The nature of the conflict is evolving and traumatised and helpless civilians find themselves trapped in the crossfire, kicked out of their homes, and cut-off from their fields and livelihoods. At the very least all parties need to stop attacking non-combatants and allow a minimum of assistance to reach those in desperate need”, says Caroline Ducarme, head of mission in CAR.

Source:: Civilians pay the price of renewed, brutal fighting in the Central African Republic

      

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