Sep 192014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — An IOM health clinic built in August and now fully operational is making a huge difference for the 47,000 displaced Sudanese by the fighting who have found refuge in the UN c…

Sep 192014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — An IOM health clinic built in August and now fully operational is making a huge difference for the 47,000 displaced Sudanese by the fighting who have found refuge in the UN c…

Sep 192014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — News of up to 500 seaborne migrants being tossed to their doom near Malta — deliberately, according to eyewitness accounts — is merely the latest chapter in a horrible story unfolding on Europe’s doorstep.

Criminality, on top of desperation, has been this summer’s recipe for death — even murder, according to eyewitness accounts.

This also is a tale of impunity. As lawlessness spreads across lands already beset by civil war, disease and economic hardship, criminal organizations rush in to fill an authority vacuum left by weak governments. Libya may be the most prominent example of what happens next: criminals ply a vicious trade to prey upon vulnerable migrants.

Consider the grisly details emerging from Italy, Greece and Malta. Survivors interviewed this week by investigators of the International Organization for Migration describe smugglers charging up to $4000 apiece to board an overcrowded, creaky boat leaving Egypt, and then forcing them to switch boats in mid-sea numerous times.

According to the survivors, up to 300 migrants — perhaps as many as 100 of them children under age 10 — were stuffed into one of these crafts’ lower decks, while 200 more crowded a top deck exposed to a brutal summer sun.

On the fifth day of the journey witnesses say smugglers shadowed their vessel from what has been described as a tugboat. They came alongside the migrants’ craft and demanded they switch yet again to a smaller, less sea-worthy vessel. After the skipper of the migrants’ craft, an Egyptian, balked he was threatened that his family would be killed unless he complied. Chaos soon ensued.

Migrants began jumping to the smugglers’ boat only to be forced into the water, witnesses told IOM’s investigators. Survivors say that was when the smugglers’ boat rammed their vessel.

“After they hit our boat they waited to be sure that it had sunk completely before leaving. They were laughing,” one survivor told IOM. A week later, only 11 survivors have been found.

The rest join a growing list. IOM’s Missing Migrants Project, an effort to count everyone killed annually during “irregular” journeys, calculates that already in 2014 over 2,200 migrants have died attempting to reach Europe via the Mediterranean Sea. That’s three times 2013’s total.

In the coming weeks IOM now expects the death toll to pass 3,000 — with a quarter of the year remaining.

How can this be avoided? First, by forging policies to enable refugees’ legal, safe migration to Europe. There, many victims of the recent Mediterranean tragedies reportedly had family members waiting to receive them.

Second, nations must join forces to vigorously prosecute offenders — an effort international law already provides tools for.

Egypt, Libya, Italy and Malta are all state parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, as well its 2000 “Palermo Protocols,” which address smuggling of migrants by sea and the trafficking in persons, especially women and children.

These international instruments provide for prosecution by many authorities: not only States of the flagship vessels may prosecute, but also States of nationality of the perpetrators and their victims. Equally empowered as prosecutors are States where criminals conspire to commit their crimes — Italy, say, or Greece, if that’s where smugglers plot to drop their victims.

A principle of universal jurisdiction applies, too.

In view of the atrocious nature of the crimes, which are so grave they harm the entire international community, prosecutors have a duty to ensure no safe havens be available for those who commit them.

In international rhetoric, politicians typically show little sympathy for smuggled migrants — who they see as economic opportunists, even willing participants in their own fate. Of course by definition, migrant smuggling involves one person helping another to travel without authorization in return for payment.

Moreover, all countries have a right to control their borders. But the fact that someone has sought to evade migration controls shouldn’t put them outside the protection of law — especially if they’re being subjected to criminal coercion.

Today the overlap between smuggling and trafficking can’t be ignored. While we don’t yet know exactly what happened to those migrants found dead off Italy and Malta, evidence indicates that their deaths involved deception, extortion and extreme violence.

 Uncategorized
Sep 192014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — News of up to 500 seaborne migrants being tossed to their doom near Malta — deliberately, according to eyewitness accounts — is merely the latest chapter in a horrible story unfolding on Europe’s doorstep.

Criminality, on top of desperation, has been this summer’s recipe for death — even murder, according to eyewitness accounts.

This also is a tale of impunity. As lawlessness spreads across lands already beset by civil war, disease and economic hardship, criminal organizations rush in to fill an authority vacuum left by weak governments. Libya may be the most prominent example of what happens next: criminals ply a vicious trade to prey upon vulnerable migrants.

Consider the grisly details emerging from Italy, Greece and Malta. Survivors interviewed this week by investigators of the International Organization for Migration describe smugglers charging up to $4000 apiece to board an overcrowded, creaky boat leaving Egypt, and then forcing them to switch boats in mid-sea numerous times.

According to the survivors, up to 300 migrants — perhaps as many as 100 of them children under age 10 — were stuffed into one of these crafts’ lower decks, while 200 more crowded a top deck exposed to a brutal summer sun.

On the fifth day of the journey witnesses say smugglers shadowed their vessel from what has been described as a tugboat. They came alongside the migrants’ craft and demanded they switch yet again to a smaller, less sea-worthy vessel. After the skipper of the migrants’ craft, an Egyptian, balked he was threatened that his family would be killed unless he complied. Chaos soon ensued.

Migrants began jumping to the smugglers’ boat only to be forced into the water, witnesses told IOM’s investigators. Survivors say that was when the smugglers’ boat rammed their vessel.

“After they hit our boat they waited to be sure that it had sunk completely before leaving. They were laughing,” one survivor told IOM. A week later, only 11 survivors have been found.

The rest join a growing list. IOM’s Missing Migrants Project, an effort to count everyone killed annually during “irregular” journeys, calculates that already in 2014 over 2,200 migrants have died attempting to reach Europe via the Mediterranean Sea. That’s three times 2013’s total.

In the coming weeks IOM now expects the death toll to pass 3,000 — with a quarter of the year remaining.

How can this be avoided? First, by forging policies to enable refugees’ legal, safe migration to Europe. There, many victims of the recent Mediterranean tragedies reportedly had family members waiting to receive them.

Second, nations must join forces to vigorously prosecute offenders — an effort international law already provides tools for.

Egypt, Libya, Italy and Malta are all state parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, as well its 2000 “Palermo Protocols,” which address smuggling of migrants by sea and the trafficking in persons, especially women and children.

These international instruments provide for prosecution by many authorities: not only States of the flagship vessels may prosecute, but also States of nationality of the perpetrators and their victims. Equally empowered as prosecutors are States where criminals conspire to commit their crimes — Italy, say, or Greece, if that’s where smugglers plot to drop their victims.

A principle of universal jurisdiction applies, too.

In view of the atrocious nature of the crimes, which are so grave they harm the entire international community, prosecutors have a duty to ensure no safe havens be available for those who commit them.

In international rhetoric, politicians typically show little sympathy for smuggled migrants — who they see as economic opportunists, even willing participants in their own fate. Of course by definition, migrant smuggling involves one person helping another to travel without authorization in return for payment.

Moreover, all countries have a right to control their borders. But the fact that someone has sought to evade migration controls shouldn’t put them outside the protection of law — especially if they’re being subjected to criminal coercion.

Today the overlap between smuggling and trafficking can’t be ignored. While we don’t yet know exactly what happened to those migrants found dead off Italy and Malta, evidence indicates that their deaths involved deception, extortion and extreme violence.

 Uncategorized
Sep 192014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein on Friday urged Egypt and other North African and European States with relevant information to make a concerted effort to bring to justice the people smugglers who allegedly deliberately sank a boat causing the deaths of between 300 and 500 refugees and migrants in the Mediterranean last week.

High Commissioner Zeid stressed that it was crucial to bring to an end the prevailing impunity surrounding such crimes and urged States to do more to address the root causes driving people to make such dangerous journeys.

“This is a truly horrendous incident,” Zeid said. “It is the duty of States to investigate such atrocious crimes, bring the perpetrators to justice, and even more importantly to do more to prevent them from happening in the first place. All the countries in the Mediterranean must make a concerted effort to clamp down on the smugglers who are exploiting one of the most vulnerable groups on the planet and endangering their lives, virtually on a daily basis, purely for financial gain.”

“The callous act of deliberately ramming a boat full of hundreds of defenceless people is a crime that must not go unpunished. If the survivors’ accounts are indeed true – and they appear all too credible – we are looking at what amounts to mass murder in the Mediterranean.”

Similar efforts, he said, should also be made to punish and deter such crimes in other parts of the world, including the Gulf of Aden, Indian Ocean and Caribbean as well as those carried out against migrants and refugees using land routes.

“All countries would throw the full weight of their police forces and justice systems behind an investigation if the victims were their own citizens and were killed by criminal gangs on their own soil,” Zeid said. “The reaction should not be any less rigorous just because the victims are foreigners and the crime took place on the high seas. Yet very few people who kill, rape or rob migrants during their journeys end up in court.”

According to the 11 survivors interviewed by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the migrants and refugees first embarked on a boat in the Egyptian port of Damietta. The passengers included a substantial number of Palestinians, many of them from Gaza, along with Egyptians, Syrians, Sudanese and possibly other nationalities.

All witnesses interviewed so far told IOM staff that the smugglers who deliberately rammed the boat far out to sea between Malta and Greece were either Egyptian or Palestinian. The High Commissioner urged the Greek, Maltese and Italian authorities to share information on the identity of the smugglers with the Egyptian authorities, who he said should immediately also launch a full and thorough investigation. “You cannot transport large quantities of foreigners in buses into a major port and cram them on board a ship without the port authorities and other witnesses being aware of what is going on,” Zeid said.

While recognizing the complexity of modern migration movements, Zeid urged all States to remember that migrants have the same rights as all other human beings. He stressed that the root causes of such tragedies must be tackled by the relevant States and by the international community.

“Far too many refugees and migrants are dying all across the world in an effort to flee conflict, systematic political oppression and human rights violations, including economic deprivation. These root causes in their countries of origin must be tackled in a concerted manner,” Zeid said.

“We also need a renewed effort to find ways to manage refugee and other migratory movements in an orderly manner that reduces the need for people to resort to unscrupulous people smugglers. The European Union, other destination States, transit countries and countries of origin must do more to address the range of factors pushing so many people into the arms of the smugglers. The focus, at every stage of the process needs to be on respect for the rights and inherent dignity of every human being.”

Zeid warned that xenophobia-driven politics continue to undermine Governments’ determination to find real solutions to an increasingly desperate situation in many parts of the world. He stressed that it is essential that refugees are able to escape to safety, and that States do not penalize them for taking irregular routes, as well as taking more robust steps to protect them when they do.

“There were refugees as well as economic migrants on board this boat,” Zeid said. “The largest and fastest-growing group of people claiming asylum in Europe in 2014 are Syrians – a clear manifestation of the deplorable failure to bring that conflict to an end, and of increasing pressures, frustrations and loss of hope on the part of the more than 3 million Syrian refugees, the great majority of whom are still in over-burdened neighbouring States,” the High Commissioner added. Other major groups of asylum seekers that have been rising sharply in Europe over the past year include Iraqis and Eritreans, many of whom are escaping systematic political oppression and forced conscription.

Sep 192014
 

PARIS, France, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Alcatel-Lucent (Euronext Paris and NYSE: ALU) (http://www.alcatel-lucent.com) has today been named by S&P Dow Jones Indices, one of the world’s largest providers of financial market indices, and RobecoSAM, the investment specialist focused exclusively on sustainability investing, as leader of the Technology Hardware & Equipment industry group in the 2014 Dow Jones Sustainability Indices review with an overall score of 91/100.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/alcatel-lucent.png

Key Facts

• In its 2014 report on Alcatel-Lucent, DJSI/Robeco SAM said: “Alcatel-Lucent and its research organization Bell Laboratories have continued to lead the discussion on eco-innovation and communications technology (ICT) industry.”

• The company continued its active role in defining international standards in ICT energy efficiency and developing a greenhouse gas emissions reporting methodology through collaboration with global institutes such as the WBCSD and the World Resources Institute.

• Alcatel-Lucent also leveraged its leadership position to promote digital inclusion and digital literacy among disadvantaged communities throughout the world in particular through the work of Alcatel-Lucent Foundation.

• The company also received top industry scores in Code of Conduct/Compliance/Corruption&Bribery as well as in Supply Chain Management.

• This is the fourth year in a row, Alcatel-Lucent has been recognized in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices. The company was named Technology Supersector Leader in 2012 and leader of the CMT Communications Technology Sector in 2011.

• Launched in 1999, the Dow Jones Sustainability Indices pioneered tracking of the financial performance of the world’s leading sustainability-driven companies. Based on the cooperation of Dow Jones Indexes and RobecoSAM, it provides asset managers with reliable and objective benchmarks to manage sustainability portfolios. In addition to financial performance, the index assesses a comprehensive range of sustainability areas, including environmental, management of human resources, community support and philanthropic.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Alcatel-Lucent.

ALCATEL-LUCENT PRESS CONTACTS

SIMON POULTER

simon.poulter@alcatel-lucent.com

T : +33 (0)1 55 14 10 06

ALCATEL-LUCENT INVESTOR RELATIONS

MARISA BALDO

marisa.baldo@alcatel-lucent.com

T : +33 (0)1 55 14 11 20

JACQUES-OLIVIER VALLET

jacques-olivier.vallet@alcatel-lucent.com

T : +33 (0)1 55 14 12 49

TOM BEVILACQUA

thomas.bevilacqua@alcatel-lucent.com

T : + 1 908-582-7998

Useful links

To read full details of how Alcatel-Lucent performed in the 2014 DJSI review, and how it achieved its status as Industry Group Leader to Technology Hardware & Equipment, please visit: http://www.sustainability-indices.com/review/industry-group-leaders-2014.jsp

Read DJSI’s full press release: http://www.sustainability-indices.com/images/140911-djsi-review-2014-en-vdef.pdf

For more information on Alcatel-Lucent’s Sustainability priorities and activities, please visit: http://www.alcatel-lucent.com/sustainability

ABOUT ALCATEL-LUCENT (EURONEXT PARIS AND NYSE: ALU) (HTTP://WWW.ALCATEL-LUCENT.COM)

We are at the forefront of global communications, providing products and innovations in IP and cloud networking, as well as ultra-broadband fixed and wireless access to service providers and their customers, and to enterprises and institutions throughout the world. Underpinning us in driving the industrial transformation from voice telephony to high-speed digital delivery of data, video and information is Bell Labs, an integral part of the Group and one of the world’s foremost technology research institutes, responsible for countless breakthroughs that have shaped the networking and communications industry. Our innovations have resulted in our Group being recognized by Thomson Reuters as a Top 100 Global Innovator, as well as being named by MIT Technology Review as amongst 2012’s Top 50 “World’s Most Innovative Companies”. We have also been recognized for innovation in sustainability, being named Industry Group Leader in the Technology Hardware & Equipment sector in the 2013 Dow Jones Sustainability Indices review, for making global communications more sustainable, affordable and accessible, all in pursuit of the Group’s mission to realize the potential of a connected world.

With revenues of Euro 14.4 billion in 2013, Alcatel-Lucent is listed on the Paris and New York stock exchanges (Euronext and NYSE: ALU). The company is incorporated in France and headquartered in Paris.

For more information, visit Alcatel-Lucent on: http://www.alcatel-lucent.com, read the latest posts on the Alcatel-Lucent blog http://www.alcatel-lucent.com/blog and follow the Company on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Alcatel_Lucent.

Sep 192014
 

NEW YORK, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The new Permanent Representative of Egypt to the United Nations, Amr Abdellatif Aboulatta, presented his credentials to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on 4 September 2014.

Since Sept…

Sep 192014
 

OTTAWA, Canada, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Today, the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, delivered closing remarks at the first Canada-Africa Business Summit, hosted by the Canadian Council on Africa (CCAfrica).

“Africa’s development is not only an important economic growth story, it is also a development story.” said Minister Paradis. “It’s about jobs, education, access to training and health care services. It’s about sustainable growth and wealth distribution. As investors, Canadian businesses are models of best practice. They use innovative approaches, financial instruments and technologies to build local capacity and create benefits for communities. Their presence is positive for the countries in which they operate, and perhaps even more importantly, for those who live there.”

Current rates of economic growth across Africa have the potential to bring sustainable poverty reduction across the continent. In his remarks, Minister Paradis announced that Canada is providing funding to the 13th replenishment of the African Development Fund to help Africa’s poorest and most vulnerable countries receive grants and low-interest loans. Canada is committed to supporting development in sub-Saharan Africa, and will continue to play a leadership role in maternal, newborn and child health and in supporting sustainable economic growth.

“African states have made their development needs and priorities clear,” added the Minister. “Canada, and Canadian businesses, have the capital, technology, and entrepreneurial expertise to help them implement their vision. If we are to break down those last, persistent barriers to eliminating global poverty, Canada needs to diversify its development programming. We need innovative funding mechanisms that support private-sector-led growth that lead to sustainable solutions and that create jobs and wealth on both sides of the world.”

While in Toronto the Minister also met with Mr. Tolesa Shagui, Minister of the Ministry of Mines of Ethiopia, where they discussed increased cooperation and results. Together the Ministers announced an initiative to strengthen education for mining in Ethiopia, by providing technical vocational training for the community-based workforce and by preparing graduates—both men and women—for employment in the extractive sector. This initiative will increase access to cutting-edge fields such as geology and mining engineering.

Quick Facts

• The Canadian Council on Africa (CCAfrica) is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to promote trade and economic development between Canada and Africa.

• Ethiopia, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Tanzania, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan are development countries of focus under Canada’s Aid Effectiveness Agenda.

• There are 12 sub-Saharan African countries listed as priority markets under our Global Markets Action Plan.

• Exports of oil and minerals from Africa, Asia, and Central and South America in 2012 were worth more than US$1.35 trillion—more than 15 times the amount of official development assistance provided to these same regions in that year.

Sep 192014
 

OTTAWA, Canada, September 19, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, today called on Canadian businesses to seize the opportunities that more trade and investment with emerging markets in Africa offers. In his address to Canadian and African businesses, non-governmental organizations and African government representatives during the Canada-Africa Business Summit in Toronto, Minister Fast pointed to the long-standing trade, investment, development, education and cultural ties between Canada and African countries that continue to foster economic success.

Canada’s commitment to corporate social responsibility and sustainable development is an important element of our engagement with Africa. This includes supporting the Canadian extractive sector in its responsible and transparent operations in Africa and working with host countries to develop capacities to manage their natural resources.

During his trade mission to Africa in June, Minister Fast announced that Export Development Canada is expanding its presence at the Canadian embassy in Johannesburg, South Africa, providing on-the-ground support in southern Africa and assisting Canadian businesses, especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), in boosting their exports.

Under the Global Markets Action Plan, the Government of Canada is committed to providing the tools to help businesses succeed, including free trade agreements, foreign investment promotion and protection agreements (FIPAs) and air transport agreements. Canadian businesses can also count on the support of the Business Development Bank of Canada, Canadian Commercial Corporation and Canadian Trade Commissioner Service, with trade commissioners serving Canadian business needs in 16 African countries.

Quick Facts

• The International Monetary Fund expects the sub-Saharan economy to grow by 5.4 percent in 2014 and by 5.5 percent in 2015.

• Canada’s bilateral trade with continental Africa was $13.3 billion in 2013.

• As part of its plan to promote and protect Canadian investments in sub-Saharan Africa, Canada has FIPAs in force with Benin and Tanzania; has signed agreements with Cameroon and Nigeria; and has concluded negotiations with Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Madagascar, Mali, Senegal and Zambia. FIPA negotiations are under way with Ghana and Kenya.

• Minister Fast has led three trade missions to Africa over the last three years, visiting eight countries.

Quote

“Increased trade and investment is transforming countless lives and communities across Africa, just as it is creating jobs and generating economic growth in Canada and African countries alike. We are committed to opening new markets for our exporters and ensuring that Canadian companies, especially SMEs, take advantage of the opportunities our ambitious pro-trade, pro-export plan creates for them. Our FIPAs and sector-focused trade missions, along with help from our trade commissioners and close cooperation with Export Development Canada and the Canadian Commercial Corporation, are part of the many ways we are supporting Canadian SMEs as they grow, expand and succeed around the world.”

Sep 182014
 

OTTAWA, Canada, September 18, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Minister Fast with Louis-Paul Motazé, Secretary General, Office of the Prime Minister of Cameroon

Once in force, the Canada-Cameroon FIPA will offer greater protection for Canadian companies operating there

September 18, 2014 – Toronto, Ontario – The Honourable Ed Fast, Minister of International Trade, meets Louis-Paul Motazé, Secretary General, Office of the Prime Minister of Cameroon, on the margins of the Canada-Africa Business Summit, where Minister Fast delivered a keynote address. The two ministers discussed growing investment ties between the two countries and the progress on their respective ratification processes to bring into force the Canada-Cameroon Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement (FIPA). When in force, the FIPA will promote two-way investment and offer greater protection to Canadian companies operating in Cameroon through reciprocal, legally binding provisions.

Canadian companies are already active in Cameroon. In 2012, Canadian mining assets in Cameroon were valued at $61.3 million. In its recently launched Global Markets Action Plan, Canada identified Cameroon as an emerging market with specific opportunities for Canadian businesses in sectors such as infrastructure and education, as well as mining, and oil and gas. Two-way merchandise trade between Canada and Cameroon was valued at nearly $53.5 million in 2013, an increase of 5.7 percent from the previous year.

As part of its plan to promote and protect Canadian investments abroad, Canada concluded, signed or brought into force FIPAs with 10 countries in 2013—a record for a single year. Seven of these were with African countries: Benin, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia. Canada has FIPAs in force with Benin, Egypt and Tanzania, and FIPA negotiations are under way with Ghana, Kenya and Tunisia. Canada currently has 27 FIPAs in force around the world.

For further information, please see Canada-Cameroon FIPA.

Sep 182014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 18, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — A group of United Nations human rights experts* today urged the Government of Ethiopia to stop misusing anti-terrorism legislation to curb freedoms of expression and association in the country, amid reports that people continue to be detained arbitrarily.

The experts’ call comes on the eve of the consideration by Ethiopia of a series of recommendations made earlier this year by members of the Human Rights Council in a process known as the Universal Periodic Review and which applies equally to all 193 UN Members States. These recommendations are aimed at improving the protection and promotion of human rights in the country, including in the context of counter-terrorism measures.

“Two years after we first raised the alarm, we are still receiving numerous reports on how the anti-terrorism law is being used to target journalists, bloggers, human rights defenders and opposition politicians in Ethiopia,” the experts said. “Torture and inhuman treatment in detention are gross violations of fundamental human rights.”

“Confronting terrorism is important, but it has to be done in adherence to international human rights to be effective,” the independent experts stressed. “Anti-terrorism provisions need to be clearly defined in Ethiopian criminal law, and they must not be abused.”

The experts have repeatedly highlighted issues such as unfair trials, with defendants often having no access to a lawyer. “The right to a fair trial, the right to freedom of opinion and expression, and the right to freedom of association continue to be violated by the application of the anti-terrorism law,” they warned.

“We call upon the Government of Ethiopia to free all persons detained arbitrarily under the pretext of countering terrorism,” the experts said. “Let journalists, human rights defenders, political opponents and religious leaders carry out their legitimate work without fear of intimidation and incarceration.”

The human rights experts reiterated their call on the Ethiopian authorities to respect individuals’ fundamental rights and to apply anti-terrorism legislation cautiously and in accordance with Ethiopia’s international human rights obligations.

“We also urge the Government of Ethiopia to respond positively to the outstanding request to visit by the Special Rapporteurs on freedom of peaceful assembly and association, on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and on the situation of human rights defenders,” they concluded.