Sep 172014
 

WASHINGTON, September 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Atlanta, Georgia

4:01 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, everybody. Please be seated. I want to thank Dr. Frieden and everybody here at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for welcoming me here today. Tom and his team just gave me an update on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, our efforts to help mobilize the international community to fight it, and the steps that we’re taking to keep people here at home safe.

Tom and his team are doing outstanding work. Between the specialists they have on the ground in West Africa and here at headquarters, they’ve got hundreds of professionals who are working tirelessly on this issue. This is the largest international response in the history of the CDC. After this, I’ll be meeting with some of these men and women, including some who recently returned from the front lines of the outbreak. And they represent public service at its very best. And so I just want them to know how much the American people appreciate them. Many of them are serving far away from home, away from their families. They are doing heroic work and serving in some unbelievably challenging conditions — working through exhaustion, day and night, and many have volunteered to go back. So we are very, very proud of them.

Their work and our efforts across the government is an example of what happens when America leads in confronting some major global challenges. Faced with this outbreak, the world is looking to us, the United States, and it’s a responsibility that we embrace. We’re prepared to take leadership on this to provide the kinds of capabilities that only America has, and to mobilize the world in ways that only America can do. That’s what we’re doing as we speak.

First and foremost, I want the American people to know that our experts, here at the CDC and across our government, agree that the chances of an Ebola outbreak here in the United States are extremely low. We’ve been taking the necessary precautions, including working with countries in West Africa to increase screening at airports so that someone with the virus doesn’t get on a plane for the United States. In the unlikely event that someone with Ebola does reach our shores, we’ve taken new measures so that we’re prepared here at home. We’re working to help flight crews identify people who are sick, and more labs across our country now have the capacity to quickly test for the virus. We’re working with hospitals to make sure that they are prepared, and to ensure that our doctors, our nurses and our medical staff are trained, are ready, and are able to deal with a possible case safely.

And here I’ve got to commend everybody at Emory University Hospital. I just had the opportunity to meet with Doctors Gartland and Ribner and members of their team and the nurses who — sorry, doctors, but having been in hospitals, I know — (laughter) — they’re the ones really doing the work. And I had a chance to thank them for their extraordinary efforts in helping to provide care for the first Americans who recently contracted the disease in Africa. The first two of those patients were released last month and continue to improve. And it’s a reminder for the American people that, should any cases appear in the United States, we have world-class facilities and professionals ready to respond. And we have effective surveillance mechanisms in place.

I should mention, by the way, that I had a chance to see Dr. Brantly in the Oval Office this morning. And although he is still having to gain back some weight, he looks great. He looks strong and we are incredibly grateful to him and his family for the service that he has rendered to people who are a lot less lucky than all of us.

As we all know, however, West Africa is facing a very different situation, especially in the hardest hit countries: Liberia, Sierra Leone, and in Guinea. Tom and others recently returned from the region, and the scenes that they describe are just horrific. More than 2,400 men, women and children are known to have died — and we strongly suspect that the actual death toll is higher than that. Hospitals, clinics and the few treatment centers that do exist have been completely overwhelmed. An already very weak public health system is near collapse in these countries. Patients are being turned away, and people are literally dying in the streets.

Now, here’s the hard truth: In West Africa, Ebola is now an epidemic of the likes that we have not seen before. It’s spiraling out of control. It is getting worse. It’s spreading faster and exponentially. Today, thousands of people in West Africa are infected. That number could rapidly grow to tens of thousands. And if the outbreak is not stopped now, we could be looking at hundreds of thousands of people infected, with profound political and economic and security implications for all of us. So this is an epidemic that is not just a threat to regional security — it’s a potential threat to global security if these countries break down, if their economies break down, if people panic. That has profound effects on all of us, even if we are not directly contracting the disease.

And that’s why, two months ago, I directed my team to make this a national security priority. We’re working this across our entire government, which is why today I’m joined by leaders throughout my administration, including from my national security team.

And we’ve devoted significant resources in support of our strategy with four goals in mind. Number one, to control the outbreak. Number two, to address the ripple effects of local economies and communities to prevent a truly massive humanitarian disaster. Number three, to coordinate a broader global response. And number four, to urgently build up a public health system in these countries for the future — not just in West Africa but in countries that don’t have a lot of resources generally.

Now, this is a daunting task. But here’s what gives us hope. The world knows how to fight this disease. It’s not a mystery. We know the science. We know how to prevent it from spreading. We know how to care for those who contract it. We know that if we take the proper steps, we can save lives. But we have to act fast. We can’t dawdle on this one. We have to move with force and make sure that we are catching this as best we can, given that it has already broken out in ways that we had not seen before.

So today, I’m announcing a major increase in our response. At the request of the Liberian government, we’re going to establish a military command center in Liberia to support civilian efforts across the region — similar to our response after the Haiti earthquake. It’s going to be commanded by Major General Darryl Williams, commander of our Army forces in Africa. He just arrived today and is now on the ground in Liberia. And our forces are going to bring their expertise in command and control, in logistics, in engineering. And our Department of Defense is better at that, our Armed Services are better at that than any organization on Earth.

We’re going to create an air bridge to get health workers and medical supplies into West Africa faster. We’re going to establish a staging area in Senegal to help distribute personnel and aid on the ground more quickly. We are going to create a new training site to train thousands of health workers so they can effectively and safely care for more patients. Personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service will deploy to the new field hospitals that we’re setting up in Liberia. And USAID will join with international partners and local communities in a Community Care Campaign to distribute supplies and information kits to hundreds of thousands of families so they can better protect themselves.

We’re also going to build additional treatment units, including new isolation spaces and more than 1,000 beds. And in all our efforts, the safety of our personnel will remain a top priority. Meanwhile, our scientists continue their urgent research in the hope of finding new treatments and perhaps vaccines. And today I’m calling on Congress to approve the funding that we’ve requested so that we can carry on with all these critical efforts.

Today, the United States is doing even more. But this is a global threat, and it demands a truly global response. International organizations just have to move faster than they have up until this point. More nations need to contribute experienced personnel, supplies, and funding that’s needed, and they need to deliver on what they pledge quickly. Charities and individual philanthropists have given generously, and they can make a big difference. And so we’re not restricting these efforts to governmental organizations; we also need NGOs and private philanthropies to work with us in a coordinated fashion in order to maximize the impact of our response.

This week, the United States will chair an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council. Next week, I’ll join U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to continue mobilizing the international community around this effort. And then, at the White House, we’re going to bring more nations together to strengthen our global health security so that we can better prevent, detect and respond to future outbreaks before they become epidemics.

This is actually something that we had announced several months ago at the G7 meeting. We determined that this has to be a top priority; this was before the Ebola outbreak. We anticipated the fact that in many of these countries with a weak public health system, if we don’t have more effective surveillance, more effective facilities on the ground, and are not helping poor countries in developing their ability to catch these things quickly, that there was at least the potential of seeing these kinds of outbreaks. And sadly, we now see that our predictions were correct. It gives more urgency to this effort — a global health initiative — that we have been pushing internationally.

Let me just close by saying this: The scenes that we’re witnessing in West Africa today are absolutely gut-wrenching. In one account over the weekend, we read about a family in Liberia. The disease had already killed the father. The mother was cradling a sick and listless five-year-old son. Her other son, 10-years-old, was dying, too. They finally reached a treatment center but they couldn’t get in. And, said a relative, “We are just sitting.”

These men and women and children are just sitting, waiting to die, right now. And it doesn’t have to be this way.

The reality is that this epidemic is going to get worse before it gets better. But right now, the world still has an opportunity to save countless lives. Right now, the world has the responsibility to act — to step up, and to do more. The United States of America intends to do more. We are going to keep leading in this effort. We’re going to do our part, and we’re going to continue to make sure that the world understands the need for them to step alongside us as well in order for us to not just save the lives of families like the one I just discussed, but ultimately, to make sure that this doesn’t have the kinds of spillover effects that become even more difficult to control.

So thank you very much to the entire team that’s already doing this work. And please know that you’ve got your President and Commander-in-Chief behind you. Thank you.

Sep 172014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — WHO welcomes the contribution from the Government of the United States of America to significantly build upon their previous Ebola response in West Africa.

The new commitment provides support to the United Nations and to other international partners to help the Governments of Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, and Senegal in their work to contain this outbreak.

“This massive ramp-up of support from the United States is precisely the kind of transformational change we need to get a grip on the outbreak and begin to turn it around,” says Dr Margaret Chan, Director-General of the World Health Organization.

The backbone of the US response is military leadership and the establishment of a regional command and control in Monrovia. The approach includes a military staging base to facilitate the coordination of the American and international response and to expedite the transportation of equipment, supplies and personnel including up to 3,000 from the military.

In addition, engineers will construct additional Ebola Treatment Units in affected areas and establish a site to train up to 500 health workers per week to care for patients.

The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps will deploy 65 health workers to support the previously-announced, state-of-the-art hospital that will be placed in Monrovia to provide care to health workers who become sick.

The WHO Ebola response roadmap, released on 28 August, highlights the need for a massively scaled response to support affected countries. The commitment from the US Government exemplifies the kind of international effort required to intensify response activities and strengthen national capacities.

Sep 172014
 

LUANDA, Angola, September 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Mr. Naoyuki Shinohara, Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), visited Angola during September 14-16, 2014, and issued the following statement at the conclusion of the visit:

“I would like to thank Vice-President Manuel Vicente for his hospitality and our fruitful discussions during my visit. I also had the privilege to meet the Acting President of the National Assembly Joana Lina Ramos Baptista, Minister of Finance Armando Manuel, National Bank of Angola Governor José Massano, and representatives of the business community and civil society. I had the honor to address faculty and students at the Agostinho Neto University, visited and made a donation to the Dom Bosco Salesian community in Luanda, which focuses on youth education, and was shown the impressive transformation of Luanda’s port.

“In our discussions we covered many important topics, including the maintenance of macroeconomic and financial stability, continued diversification of the economy, good governance, and policies to enhance job creation and reduce poverty and inequality. I was encouraged by the progress made over the last five years and the authorities’ strong commitment and efforts to transform Angola into a more inclusive economy.

“I am pleased with the open dialogue with the authorities on their efforts to address Angola’s macroeconomic challenges and implement economic reforms. We discussed issues concerning policy advice as part of the IMF annual consultations with this important member country as well as stepped-up IMF technical assistance to Angola. There has been progress over the past several years toward implementing sound economic policies to deliver historically-low inflation, adequate international reserves and robust growth. More recently, the Angolan authorities accelerated their efforts to improve the business environment, which bodes well for the future.

“But more needs to be done. Angola still faces challenges, in particular fiscal deficits, dependence on oil exports, improving infrastructure and oversight on public investments, and reducing poverty. Angola is strengthening financial sector governance, and it will be important to continue efforts to further strengthen bank supervision. It is also important that the government carries on pushing for good governance and the rule of law.

“I encouraged the authorities to continue the reforms, particularly to address the emerging fiscal deficits in order to protect the economy against swings in international oil prices and preserve space for their objectives to rebuild infrastructure, while saving part of the oil wealth for future generations. In this connection, it will be important to increase domestic revenue mobilization by improving revenue administration, restrain the growth of current spending by adopting a modern wage policy for civil servants and reducing costly and regressive fuel subsidies, while expanding mechanisms to protect the poor and improve public investment efficiency through better project selection and monitoring.

“The IMF remains committed to assist the Angolan government in the best possible way to address these challenges and meet its development goals.”

 Uncategorized
Sep 162014
 

NAIROBI, Kenya, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Federal Government of Nigeria is setting in motion new efforts to address long-term oil pollution in Ogoniland, Nigeria. The move by Nigeria’s Minister of Petroleum Resources, Mrs. Diezani Alison-Madueke, to convene a multi-stakeholder workshop on the implementation of the UN Environment Programme’s 2011 assessment of Ogoniland marks an important step towards the large-scale clean-up of the region.

The workshop in Abuja today will discuss the measures needed to implement the recommendations outlined in the 2011 UNEP report entitled, “Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland”. Participants from civil society, Ogoni communities, government, academia and the oil industry will attend the workshop. The day-long meeting will be held under the leadership of the Federal Government of Nigeria, with Mr. Erik Solheim, chairman of the OECD Development Assistance Committee, chairing the sessions.

Mr. Solheim has, since early 2013, served as a UNEP Special Envoy for Ogoniland, conducting and coordinating high-level political talks related to the planned environmental clean-up in Ogoniland.

Since the release of the Assessment in 2011, UNEP has expressed its readiness to support restoration efforts and commends the latest efforts by the Federal Government to put the necessary procedures in place for a large-scale clean-up and restoration of the region.

The UNEP report, conducted at the request of the Federal Government of Nigeria, was a detailed scientific assessment of environmental contamination in Ogoniland from over 50 years of oil operations in the region. The results from soil, ground water, remote sensing and public health studies showed that pollution was extensive, with widespread contamination of drinking water, land, creeks and vital ecosystems.

UNEP welcomes this positive development in Ogoniland after years of pollution. Environmental restoration will require coordinated action from oil companies, community and the government. UNEP remains ready and available to support stakeholders in making Ogoniland a cleaner and safer place for all.

Sep 162014
 

NAIROBI, Kenya, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Federal Government of Nigeria is setting in motion new efforts to address long-term oil pollution in Ogoniland, Nigeria. The move by Nigeria’s Minister of Petroleum Resources, Mrs. Diezani Alison-Madueke, to convene a multi-stakeholder workshop on the implementation of the UN Environment Programme’s 2011 assessment of Ogoniland marks an important step towards the large-scale clean-up of the region.

The workshop in Abuja today will discuss the measures needed to implement the recommendations outlined in the 2011 UNEP report entitled, “Environmental Assessment of Ogoniland”. Participants from civil society, Ogoni communities, government, academia and the oil industry will attend the workshop. The day-long meeting will be held under the leadership of the Federal Government of Nigeria, with Mr. Erik Solheim, chairman of the OECD Development Assistance Committee, chairing the sessions.

Mr. Solheim has, since early 2013, served as a UNEP Special Envoy for Ogoniland, conducting and coordinating high-level political talks related to the planned environmental clean-up in Ogoniland.

Since the release of the Assessment in 2011, UNEP has expressed its readiness to support restoration efforts and commends the latest efforts by the Federal Government to put the necessary procedures in place for a large-scale clean-up and restoration of the region.

The UNEP report, conducted at the request of the Federal Government of Nigeria, was a detailed scientific assessment of environmental contamination in Ogoniland from over 50 years of oil operations in the region. The results from soil, ground water, remote sensing and public health studies showed that pollution was extensive, with widespread contamination of drinking water, land, creeks and vital ecosystems.

UNEP welcomes this positive development in Ogoniland after years of pollution. Environmental restoration will require coordinated action from oil companies, community and the government. UNEP remains ready and available to support stakeholders in making Ogoniland a cleaner and safer place for all.

Sep 162014
 

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — At the request of the Ghanaian authorities, a team from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) will visit Accra on September 16–25 to conduct discussions on a possible IMF-supported program. On August 8, IMF Management received a formal request from the Ghanaian authorities to initiate discussions on an IMF-supported program. Discussions will continue during the coming weeks, including at the Annual Meetings of the World Bank and IMF in Washington DC in October.

The IMF mission, led by Mr. Joël Toujas-Bernaté, will meet with government officials, private sector, and the donor community.

Sep 162014
 

WASHINGTON, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — At the request of the Ghanaian authorities, a team from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) will visit Accra on September 16–25 to conduct discussions on a possible IMF-supported program. On August 8, IMF Management received a formal request from the Ghanaian authorities to initiate discussions on an IMF-supported program. Discussions will continue during the coming weeks, including at the Annual Meetings of the World Bank and IMF in Washington DC in October.

The IMF mission, led by Mr. Joël Toujas-Bernaté, will meet with government officials, private sector, and the donor community.

Sep 162014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM Greece staff in Crete today interviewed more survivors of the deliberate shipwreck of migrants heading to Europe from Egypt.

The survivors provided corroboration that the traffickers turned violent when the 500 migrants they were escorting to Europe refused to switch to an unseaworthy boat.

The survivors told IOM Tuesday that they already had been forced to change boats three times. When they refused a fourth switch – because they felt the smaller vessel was unsafe – an violent argument ensued. The smugglers threatened that if the passengers did not board the smaller boat they would be returned to Egypt, the survivors told IOM. The migrants persisted saying they would rather return than board the smaller boat.

At this stage, according to testimony from four of six survivors, the ten smugglers, said to be Palestinian and Egyptian, began yelling and throwing sticks at the migrants.

The smuggler’s vessel approached the boat with migrants some of whom managed to jump into the smaller boat. Witnesses say the smugglers forced them in the water and then rammed the bigger boat. It began to sink immediately while the smugglers stayed in the area until they were certain that the migrant’s vessel had sunk, witnesses said.

“After they hit our boat they waited to make sure that it had sunk completely before leaving. They were laughing” one of the survivors told IOM.

“When the boat was first struck, one of the passengers killed himself in despair by hanging,” he added.

The survivors, women among them, included two Palestinian nationals, an Egyptian national and one Syrian. All the witnesses stated that the smugglers were Palestinian and Egyptian nationals.

The two Palestinian survivors in Crete said their voyage began hopefully at what they called a “travel” office in Gaza, which made arrangements to get them to Italy. The cost of travel for each migrant was US$2000, paid in advance. The survivors said they had received grants to rebuild their homes and used that to pay the smugglers. The migrants were advised by the “travel” office to be in a particular spot in Egypt so that they could travel onwards by boat.

According to their statements, they arrived separately at the rendezvous in Egypt where four buses waited to take them to the Port of Damietta near Alexandria. The survivors estimated that each bus contained up to 100 persons. At the port they boarded a ship, which they estimated was 15-18 metres long with migrants already aboard.

“When we got to the port to board it looked like the ship was already half full,” the witness said.

The Captain did a headcount, and without including minors under 10 years old, counted 400-450 migrants. Based on this testimony IOM believes that up to 100 children may have been aboard and are lost at sea.

According to witnesses testimony the ship had two decks with 300 people below and 200 on the upper deck. They were at sea for four days and had to change to smaller vessels three times. Witnesses stated that the 300 people who were in the lower deck were trapped and drowned immediately. The survivors say they watched as those thrown in the water clung to each other trying to stay alive.

“The rest of us linked arms in a circle so that no one else would be lost,” a survivor told IOM in Crete.

Several managed to stay above the water for up to three days. But on the third day the weather changed: strong winds and waves swept the area and people began to disappear under the water.

Sometime later a freighter picked up nine survivors. Seven of these, including a 2 year-old girl were flown by a Greek military helicopter to hospital in Crete. One of the survivors perished and a girl remains in critical condition.

Survivors in Crete have provided the authorities’ information on the criminal gangs to the Greek Coastguard.

Infographic: http://goo.gl/JJNjzc

Sep 162014
 

CAPE-TOWN, South-Africa, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — SkyVision Global Networks Ltd. (http://www.skyvision.net), a leading global communication provider, today announced its sponsorship of the upcoming AfricaCom 2014 Conference, November 11-13, Cape Town. In addition to sponsoring the show, SkyVision will further its presence by both presenting at AfricaCom and VSAT Africa conferences and actively participating in several key panel sessions.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/skyvision.jpg

AfricaCom is deemed the largest, most professional tech event in Africa that welcomes senior decision-makers from across the digital ecosystem. AfricaCom 2014 will be attended by close to 10,000 participants, many of whom are leaders in Africa’s digital community, supported by over 300 guest speakers from Africa’s telco sector. This event is the ideal platform to learn all about new technologies and trends in the communications arena specifically suited to the African market.

“We welcome the opportunity of participating in this leading industry event in Africa as a returning exhibitor and this year, as a proud sponsor,” comments Dror Limor, SkyVision VP Sales & Marketing. “SkyVision is deeply rooted in Africa’s fast-growing telco market and takes active means in bridging the digital divide across its rural areas. We view this event as the ideal venue for us to further expand our reach throughout the continent, meeting with customers, partners, prospects, and some of the industry’s foremost decision-makers.” He added.

This year, SkyVision will highlight its extensive suite of customized, end to end communication solutions and industry-standard services. Backed by its international gateways, local PoPs and redundant global MPLS network – the company’s solutions are well positioned to offer complete turn-key connectivity solutions suited to Africa’s corporate, government and telco markets.

SkyVision’s success in Africa is the result of its reliable, hybrid satellite/terrestrial network solutions, 24/7 support centers and strong local presence through local partners, representatives and SkyVision offices in Nigeria, Senegal, Guinea Conakry, Cameroon, Burkina Faso and South Africa.

Visit SkyVision at AfricaCom 2014, November 11-13, Cape Town, Booth D4a

To schedule a meeting with the SkyVision team, contact us at: info@skyvision.net

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of SkyVision Global Networks Ltd.

For more information, contact:

Iris Tovim

Marketing Communications Director

SkyVision Global Networks

+44 20 8387 1750

irist@skyvision.net

About SkyVision

SkyVision is a global communications service provider, offering comprehensive, integrated solutions to meet all corporate, government and telco market requirements. With an emphasis on its customers’ local or regional requirements, SkyVision offers superior network connectivity solutions. Known for its innovative approach, the company offers an extensive suite of both customized solutions and industry-standard services for end-to-end IP connectivity (http://www.skyvision.net/enterprise-solutions), managed from its international gateways and selected local hubs. SkyVision’s global-reaching network connects its customers to the Internet backbone with more than ten satellite platforms and a network of high-capacity fiber optic cables, via its gateways in Africa, Europe, North America and the Middle East as well as multiple points of presence (POPs) in Africa. SkyVision currently commands a satellite and fiber network IP connectivity (http://www.skyvision.net/service/fiber-solutions) spanning 100 countries. The company’s C-Band and Ku-Band VSAT network solutions (http://www.skyvision.net/services/lobby2/Internet%20Connectivity) draw on SkyVision’s extensive space segment inventory from leading satellite providers and its capacity is carefully tailored to customers’ individual needs for optimal cost-effectiveness. Visit http://www.skyvision.net.

Sep 162014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 16, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The United Nations and its humanitarian partners today in Geneva launched a central contribution of the response to the outbreak of ebola in West Africa.

“The ebola crisis is unprecedented. It requires an exceptional, international response to address both the health crisis and the broader societal, economic and political threats to the countries affected,” said Dr. David Nabarro, UN System Senior Coordinator for Ebola.

“A growing number of international partners are coming together in the Global Ebola Response Coalition (GERC). They will help implement critical actions and support a safe and disciplined response at national and international levels,” Dr. Nabarro said, calling on donors to give the response highest priority. The GERC includes authorities in affected and at-risk countries, civil society, private sector, non-governmental organizations, multilateral organizations, international financial institutions and UN Member States.

The ebola outbreak continues to accelerate with nearly 5,000 people infected and more than 2,400 deaths across Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal and Sierra Leone. Up to 60-70 per cent of those infected do not survive.

The Overview of Needs and Requirements document presented to UN Member States, including the affected countries, goes beyond the need to treat, contain and prevent ebola. It includes elements of the response required to non-ebola humanitarian needs which have been compounded by the outbreak. The plan mainly covers activities in the three most-affected countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone for six months.

“We will do everything we can to support national governments, UN agencies, NGOs and other partners as they work on healthcare, food security, sanitation and protection issues. They are an essential part of the response if we are to stabilize this outbreak and mitigate its long-term effects,” said Valerie Amos, UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

The West Africa outbreak has a higher caseload than all other previous ebola crises combined and more than 22 million people are living in areas where active ebola transmission has been reported.

“The WHO Ebola Roadmap, launched at the end of August, sets out what we have to do to stop ebola. But it will take more than a plan to finish ebola. The strong commitment made by our UN partners and Member States is what is needed to beat this virus. And real engagement by world leaders will make the difference,” said Bruce Aylward, Assistant Director-General in the World Health Organization.