Humanitarian Coordinator visits Leer County following resumption of aid operations

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The Humanitarian Coordinator for South Sudan, Eugene Owusu, visited Leer Town and Thonyor in southern Unity State on 6 January, accompanied by members of the humanitarian community, including representatives of UN entities, NGOs and donors.

“The humanitarian situation in Unity State is extremely worrying,” said Mr. Owusu, “civilians in these areas have suffered tremendously and food insecurity and malnutrition are extremely high.”

The delegation met with local authorities in both locations and expressed appreciation for the mutual cooperation that allowed the resumption of humanitarian operations at the beginning of December 2015. Since fighting broke out in Unity State in April 2015, humanitarian presence in Leer County had been intermittent due to insecurity, with several locations inaccessible for months at a time.

“We are happy that the guns are silent and that the improved security situation has allowed us to provide urgently needed assistance to people in Leer County since early December,” said Mr. Owusu. “It is absolutely critical that the current stability be maintained so that we can continue to deliver life-saving aid in the months ahead.”

Civilians said they had survived for about seven months hiding in swampy areas and eating wild fruits. They told the delegation that homes had been burned, people killed and livelihoods destroyed during the fighting. They expressed concerns about their health and the lack of education for their children. “We don’t want to run anymore. We are happy that there is peace now,” said a man in Leer Town.

Since humanitarian partners returned to Leer County in early December, they have provided food and survival kits containing critical household items, such as mosquito nets and kitchen sets, conducted health consultations, repaired boreholes, established nutritional programs, and undertaken protection activities. The Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) results published in October 2015 emphasized that the delivery of ongoing humanitarian assistance is vital to avert the further deterioration of the food insecurity and malnutrition situation in Unity State, where an estimated 40,000 people were expected to be facing catastrophic food insecurity as of October.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

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Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on the attacks in Zliten and Sidra, Libya

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The Secretary-General condemns the deadly terrorist attack that took place today near a police base in Zliten, western Libya. He expresses his condolences to the many families of those who lost their lives or were injured and to the people of Libya.

The Secretary-General also condemns the ongoing attacks by Daesh-affiliates on oil facilities near Sidra, in central Libya. He deplores the attempts by extremists to strip these natural resources from the Libyan people.

These criminal acts serve as a strong reminder of the urgency to implement the Libyan Political Agreement and form a Government of National Accord. Unity is the best way for Libyans to confront terrorism in all its forms.

The Secretary-General renews his call on all political and security actors to create a conducive environment for the Government to assume its responsibilities. The United Nations remains committed to supporting the Libyan people as they work to achieve peace and stability in their country.

New York, 7 January 2016

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of United Nations – Office of the Spokesperson for the Secretary-General.

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Source:: Statement attributable to the Spokesman for the Secretary-General on the attacks in Zliten and Sidra, Libya

Categories: AFRICA

U.S. Donates 24 Armored Personnel Carriers to Nigeria

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As part of continuing support from the United States to the government and the people of Nigeria to defeat Boko Haram, the U.S. government today donated 24 Mine-Resistant Armor-Protected (MRAP) vehicles (valued at $11 million) to Nigeria’s military authorities.

“These vehicles provide increased protection from improvised explosive devices, roadside bombs, and small arms fire, while offering more maneuverability and better fuel economy than other types of armored personnel carriers,” the U.S. Defense Attaché to Nigeria Colonel Patrick Doyle, said.

The U.S. government donated the armored vehicles through the Excess Defense Articles Program. The Nigerian military arranged for transportation from the port to Lagos. Nigeria is in the process of receiving an additional eight (8) more MRAPs through this program, valued at approximately $7.4 million.

The Excess Defense Articles Program is designed to transfer excess military equipment from the United States to foreign governments or international organizations to help with modernization of partner nation military capabilities.

Through a similar program, the U.S. Government donated to the Nigerian Navy the NNS Okpabana in 2014 and NNS Thunder in 2012. The two ships have bolstered maritime security in Nigeria.

Today’s equipment donation represents part of the continuing U.S. commitment to Nigeria and its neighbors to counter Boko Haram’s senseless acts of terror and promote regional security. The United States provides advisors, intelligence, training, logistical support, and equipment to our African partners as they work to defeat Boko Haram. We also support those affected by Boko Haram’s violence through ongoing humanitarian aid and victim support services. The United States will continue working with our partners in the region to identify new opportunities to restore order in the Lake Chad Basin region.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of United States Diplomatic Mission to Nigeria.

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Secretary-General appoints Parfait Onanga-Anyanga of Gabon as Special Representative for the Central African Republic

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United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of Parfait Onanga-Anyanga (Gabon) as his Special Representative for the Central African Republic and Head of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA).

Mr. Onanga-Anyanga served as the Acting Special Representative for the Central African Republic and Head of MINUSCA since 16 August 2015, when he succeeded Babacar Gaye of Senegal, who served as the first Special Representative of the Secretary-General of MINUSCA.

Mr. Onanga-Anyanga brings with him extensive experience with the United Nations in conflict-affected areas, including in his role as the Coordinator of United Nations Headquarters Response to the Boko Haram crisis since January 2015, and previously as Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Burundi and Head of the United Nations Office in Burundi, as well as Assistant-Secretary-General and System-Wide Senior Coordinator on Burundi (2012-2014).

From 2007 to 2012, he was the Director of the Office of the United Nations Deputy Secretary-General. Previously, Mr. Onanga-Anyanga was Special Adviser to the President of the sixtieth and sixty-first sessions of the General Assembly from 2005 to 2007 and served as the Chef de Cabinet to the President of the fifty-ninth session of the General Assembly in 2004.

Mr. Onanga-Anyanga holds a post-graduate degree in political science from l’Université Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne, and a Master’s degree in sociology from l’Université Omar Bongo in Libreville.

Born in 1960, Mr. Onanga-Anyanga is married with three children.

New York, 7 January 2016

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of United Nations – Office of the Spokesperson for the Secretary-General.

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HR/VP Federica Mogherini meets the Libyan Presidency Council tomorrow in Tunis

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HR/VP Federica Mogherini heads to Tunisia on Friday 8 January to meet with the Libyan Presidency Council members, and start working with them on the concrete EU support to the Government of National Accord and to the Libyan people, shortly after the signing of the Libyan Political Agreement (LPA).

During her visit, HRVP Federica Mogherini will meet with the Libyan Prime Minister designate Fayez al-Sarraj and the Presidency Council members.

She will also meet with the participants to the Libyan Political Dialogue as well as with the Head of United Nations Support Mission in Libya Martin Kobler.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of European Union.

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Source:: HR/VP Federica Mogherini meets the Libyan Presidency Council tomorrow in Tunis

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Foreign Affairs MEPs visit Tunisia to support ongoing reforms

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A delegation of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the European Parliament, led by its chair Mr. Elmar Brok, visited Tunisia on 5-7 January 2016. MEPs met the President of the Republic of Tunisia, the Prime Minister as well as the President of the Tunisian Parliament to reiterate EU support to Tunisia and to stress the urgency of improving the political and security situation as well to continue with further reforms.

The seven-Member delegation, led by Mr Elmar Brok (EPP, DE), the Chair of the Committee, was composed of Mr Arnaud Danjean (EPP, FR), Mr Michael Gahler (EPP, DE), Mr Brando Benifei (S&D, IT), Mr Gilles Pargneaux (S&D, FR), Mr Amjad Bashir (ECR, UK) and Mr Fabio Massimo Castaldo (EFDD, IT – EP Rapporteur for Tunisia).

MEPs met the President of the Republic of Tunisia, Mr Béji Caïd Essebsi, the Prime Minister, Mr Habib Essid, the President of the Tunisian Parliament, the Assemblée des Représentants du Peuple, Mr Mohammed Ennaceur, and several members of the Committee for Rights, Liberties and External Relations. The delegation held meetings with the Minister for Development, Investments and International Cooperation, Mr Yassine Brahim and with the Defence Minister, Mr Farhat Horchani.

During the visit, MEPs discussed the socio-economic situation in Tunisia and the deteriorating security environment, which is exacerbated by the ongoing conflict in Libya. Both MEPs and their Tunisian counterparts stressed the urgency of improving the political and security situation in order to boost investment in the country.

MEPs expressed their condolences for the victims or the recent attacks on the presidential guard and laid floral wreaths at the memorial statue, which had been inaugurated by President Essebsi the day before their visit.

MEPs stressed the continued importance of implementing administrative, financial and judicial reform. They called for greater decentralisation of power towards legitimate local authorities and therefore the need for local elections to be held. They also pointed out that Tunisia must be empowered to take ownership of the process and that there must be proper application of the rule of law in a democratic environment.

MEPs called for the five development year plan currently being finalised by the Tunisian government to be implemented in a timely and effective manner. Positive social and economic development will only be possible with the swift implementation of this plan. The EU will indeed support an economic transformation that will allow Tunisia to become more competitive and address the worrying socio-economic situation. MEPs strongly stressed the link between security and economic development.

Furthermore, the Mr. Brok stressed the need to develop further cooperation between the EP and the Tunisian Parliament, particularly through exchanges and interparliamentary dialogue. Building strong and effective administration is a key element in the democratic process.

Finally, MEPs recalled that implementing reforms is a crucial step towards establishing democracy, an achievement of which Tunisia can be proud, particularly in the region.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of European Parliament.

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Foreign Minister Steinmeier condemns terrorist attack in Libya

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Foreign Minister Steinmeier issued the following statement today (7 January) in Berlin in response to the suicide attack on a police training centre in the Libyan town of Zliten:

We most strongly condemn this brutal terrorist attack. Our thoughts are with the victims and their loved ones.

The attack underscores once again how important and urgent it is for all Libyans to work together to eradicate the cancer that is terrorism. The government of national unity must be formed and fully functional as soon as possible. The support of all political groups is needed to this end. Only in this way will lasting peace and security be brought to all the people of Libya.

I met today with Martin Kobler, the UN Special Envoy to Libya, here in the Federal Foreign Office, and pledged our full support for his efforts to implement the peace agreement and bring stability to Libya. Germany is ready to provide a future Libyan government of unity with quick and effective assistance in rebuilding state structures.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Germany – Federal Foreign Office.

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Transfer of Two Guantanamo Detainees to Ghana

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The U.S. Department of Defense announced on January 6, 2016, the transfer of Mahmud Umar Muhammad Bin Atef and Khalid Muhammad Salih Al-Dhuby from the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay to the Government of Ghana.

The United States is grateful to the Government of Ghana for its humanitarian gesture and willingness to support ongoing U.S. efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. The United States coordinated with the Government of Ghana to ensure these transfers took place consistent with appropriate security and humane treatment measures.

The decision to transfer a detainee is made only after detailed, specific conversations with the receiving country about the potential threat a detainee may pose after transfer and the measures the receiving country will take in order to sufficiently mitigate that threat, and to ensure humane treatment.

As directed by the president’s Jan. 22, 2009, executive order, the interagency Guantanamo Review Task Force conducted a comprehensive review of these cases. As a result of those reviews, which examined a number of factors, including security issues, Atef and Al-Dhuby were unanimously approved for transfer nearly six years ago by the six departments and agencies comprising the task force.

The United States is taking all possible steps to reduce the detainee population at Guantanamo and to close the detention facility in a responsible manner. While our policy preference is to repatriate detainees to their home countries where we can do so consistent with our national security and humane treatment policies, under certain circumstances the most viable transfer option is resettlement in a third country. Of the 133 detainees who have been transferred from Guantanamo during this Administration, 82 have been resettled in third countries.

We remain very appreciative of the assistance of our friends and allies who have stepped up to accept detainees for resettlement. We appreciate this generous humanitarian action by our partner, the Republic of Ghana. The closure of Guantanamo is a goal shared by many governments around the world. Today, 105 detainees remain at Guantanamo Bay.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Embassy of the United States – Accra – Ghana.

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Statement by the HR/VP Federica Mogherini on recent attacks in Libya

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Once again Libya has been targeted by terrible violence, once again the Libyans are mourning victims of an attack.

The people of Libya deserve peace and security, and, with the Libyan Political Agreement, they have a great opportunity to set aside their divisions and work together, united, against the terrorist threat facing their country.

The quick implementation of the Libyan Political Agreement will be instrumental, so that a Government of National Accord can be established as soon as possible, to defend all Libyan citizens. It will also help preserve Libya’s resources, defeat terrorists that want to undermine Libya’s prosperity, and restore stability and security throughout the country.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of European Union.

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Lesotho and Georgia, two additional ratifications for the Trade Facilitation Agreement

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Lesotho and Georgia are the two new members that have ratified the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA). The WTO Secretariat received the countries’ instruments of acceptance on January 4th. These two ratifications bring to 65 the number of WTO members that have formally accepted the TFA. Several ratifications were submitted by ministers during the organization’s Tenth Ministerial Conference in Nairobi.

Concluded at the WTO’s 2013 Bali Ministerial Conference, the TFA contains provisions for expediting the movement, release and clearance of goods, including goods in transit. It also sets out measures for effective cooperation between customs and other appropriate authorities on trade facilitation and customs compliance issues. It further contains provisions for technical assistance and capacity building in this area.

The TFA will enter into force once two-thirds of the WTO membership has formally accepted the Agreement.

In addition to Lesotho and Georgia the following WTO members have already accepted the TFA: Myanmar, Norway, Viet Nam, Brunei, Zambia, Ukraine, Hong Kong China, Singapore, the United States, Mauritius, Malaysia, Japan, Australia, Botswana, Trinidad and Tobago, the Republic of Korea, Nicaragua, Niger, Belize, Switzerland, Chinese Taipei, China, Liechtenstein, Lao PDR, New Zealand, Togo, Thailand, the European Union (on behalf of its 28 member states), the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Pakistan, Panama, Guyana, Côte d’Ivoire, Grenada, Saint Lucia and Kenya.

The TFA broke new ground for developing and least-developed countries in the way it will be implemented. For the first time in WTO history, the requirement to implement the Agreement was directly linked to the capacity of the country to do so. In addition, the Agreement states that assistance and support should be provided to help them achieve that capacity.

A Trade Facilitation Agreement Facility (TFAF) was also created at the request of developing and least-developed country members to help ensure that they receive the assistance needed to reap the full benefits of the TFA and to support the ultimate goal of full implementation of the new agreement by all members.

Implementation of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) has the potential to increase global merchandise exports by up to $1 trillion per annum, according to the WTO’s flagship World Trade Report released on 26 October. Significantly, the Report also found that developing countries will benefit significantly from the TFA, capturing more than half of the available gains.

More information on trade facilitation and the TFA can be found atwww.wto.org/tradefacilitation.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of World Trade Organization (WTO).

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Statement by IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde at the Conclusion of a Visit to Nigeria

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Ms. Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), issued the following statement in Abuja today at the conclusion of her visit to Nigeria:

“My visit to Nigeria has been extremely fruitful and informative. I wish to thank President Muhammadu Buhari for meeting with me to discuss Nigeria’s achievements and its outlook. I also want to thank Finance Minister Kemi Adeosun and Governor Godwin Emefiele of the Central Bank of Nigeria for their insights. In addition, I had the honor to address members of the National Assembly, chaired by Honorable Bukola Saraki.

“Nigeria is the largest economy in Sub-Saharan Africa, with the largest population, and its important role at the regional level has become increasingly recognized. The economy is well diversified, no longer dominated by agriculture and oil, with services accounting for almost half of GDP, including a significant home-grown film industry and innovative startups from fashion to software development. Nigeria has also experienced a decade of strong growth, averaging 6.8 percent a year. 1n 2015, however, growth is expected to slow to about 3 1/4 percent, with a slight recovery in 2016.

“In my meetings with the authorities, we discussed how to maintain economic progress while making the transition towards more inclusive and sustainable growth. Poverty, inequality, and unemployment levels remain too high, in addition to the challenge of the Boko Haram insurgency. Nigeria also has to deal with the difficulties presented by falling oil prices, reduced emerging market demand, and tightening global financial conditions. This has led to sharply lower export earnings and government revenues. The non-oil sector has also been affected and financing for investment is hard to come by.

“Against this background, we discussed a range of policy recommendations related to improving the competitiveness of the Nigerian economy. This includes focusing on the critical area of infrastructure, where power, transportation, and housing are especially key. It also includes identifying ways to broaden the revenue base, particularly to create additional fiscal space to offset the impact of lower oil prices; and the need for careful decisions on borrowing, public spending, and managing the cost of fuel subsidies – with a view to safeguarding priority social sectors and the most vulnerable groups. This will require a package of measures involving business-friendly monetary policy, flexible exchange rate policy, and disciplined fiscal policy, and the implementation of structural reforms.

“I complimented the authorities on their efforts to address corruption, particularly the decision to publish monthly data on the finances and operations of the National Petroleum Corporation. Transparency and the rule of law will be crucial in reducing constraints to the country’s growth.

“As well as exchanging views with government officials, I had very interesting meetings with a group of women leaders and representatives of business and banks. I also visited the Mother Theresa Children’s Home charity organization, which provides care, housing, and education to vulnerable children. As always, I found it inspirational to engage with Nigeria’s young people.

“I would like to thank the Government and people of Nigeria for their welcome and warm hospitality. The IMF remains Nigeria’s committed partner as it moves forward to face the challenges of the future.”

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Monetary Fund (IMF).

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Source:: Statement by IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde at the Conclusion of a Visit to Nigeria

Categories: AFRICA

FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Ethiopia and Kenya

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Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

January 6, 2016

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-16-001-055273

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Friday, February 5, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov NOT through GrantsSolutions.gov. Please note that if you apply on the GrantSolutions.gov site, your application will be disqualified. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Full Text of Notice of Funding Opportunity

A. Program Description

This announcement references PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional information on PRM’s priorities and NGO funding strategy with which selected organizations must comply. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Submissions that do not reflect the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

Current Funding Priorities:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in the Horn of Africa region as identified below.

(b) Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50 percent refugees. Please note that projects that do not meet the protection/assistance gap(s) below will not be considered.

Country-specific Provisions:

Ethiopia

(a) For activities in Benishangul-Gumuz, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Energy and environmental management (household energy and fuel usage)

(ii) Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

(iii) Protection (child protection and/or gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response)

(b) For activities in Dollo Ado, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Healthcare (primary care, reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Livelihoods, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis

(iv) Nutrition and food security (activities to support diet diversification or food-related livelihoods)

(v) Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

(vi) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

(c) For activities in Gambella, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Healthcare (reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Livelihoods, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis

(iv) Nutrition and food security (activities to support diet diversification or food-related livelihoods)

(v) Protection (GBV prevention and response; and/or assistance to unaccompanied or separated minors; and/or child protection)

(vi) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

(d) For activities in Jijiga, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Healthcare (reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Livelihoods, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis

(iv) Nutrition and food security (activities to support diet diversification or food-related livelihoods)

(v) Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

(vi) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

(e) For activities in Tigray, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Health (reproductive health and/or maternal and child health; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Nutrition and food security (activities to support diet diversification or food-related livelihoods)

(iv) Protection (child protection and/or GBV prevention and response)

(v) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

Kenya

(f) For activities in Dadaab camps, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Health (reproductive health; maternal and/or child health/nutrition; assistance to elderly with specific needs; and/or other vulnerable populations; and/or to persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Livelihoods (linked to vocational skills development and/or youth education/training that benefit both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

(iv) Protection (GBV prevention and response; child protection, and/or assistance to separated and unaccompanied minors)

(v) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

(g) For activities in Kakuma camps, proposals may focus on one or more of the following areas of intervention:

(i) Education (primary and/or secondary)

(ii) Health (reproductive health; maternal and/or child health/nutrition; assistance for elderly with specific needs and/or other vulnerable populations; and/or persons living with disabilities)

(iii) Livelihoods (linked to vocational training, skills development, and/or youth education that benefit both refugees and host nationals, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

(iv) Protection (GBV prevention and response; support to LGBTI refugees; child protection, and/or assistance to separated or unaccompanied minors)

(v) Psychosocial assistance (mental health)

(h) For activities in other refugee hosting areas, proposals may focus on the following area of intervention:

(i) Protection (GBV prevention and response; support to LGBTI refugees; child protection and/or assistance to separated or unaccompanied minors – boys and/or girls; asylum-seekers and other vulnerable refugees)

(ii) Livelihoods (vocational education/training, N.B. Any proposal must include a completed market analysis)

(iii) Health (mental health and/or psychosocial assistance)

B. Federal Award Information

Proposed program start dates: May 1 – August 15, 2016

Duration of Activity: Program plans for one, two, or three years will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed one year (12 months) in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be more than $1,500,000, or they will be disqualified.

C. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Notice of Funding Opportunity announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

2. Cost Sharing or Matching: Cost sharing, matching, or cost participation is not a requirement of an application in response to this funding announcement.

3. Other:

(a) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective. Objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(b) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including new guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(c) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and that can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively.

NOTE: PRM partners must complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). The analysis should identify specific at-risk sub-populations of women and girls, in particular women and girl heads of households, out-of-school girls, girls with disabilities, married girls, and adolescent mothers who are often unaware of and excluded from mainstream interventions and service delivery and who may be essentially hidden. A gender analysis should be included in all applications for funding and is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(d) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding. Proposals should include a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities. This letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address. (Applicants are encouraged to make timely requests to UNHCR to allow for sufficient time to review proposed activities and process letters of support);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas;

• an understanding of, and sensitivity to, conflict dynamics in the project location.

D. Application and Submission Instructions

1. Address to Request Application Package:

(a) Application packages may be downloaded from the website www.Grants.gov.

2. Content and Form of Application:

(a) This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

(b) PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator to receive an automated reply with the templates.

New page limits: Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 15 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 10 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total; however, annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process. For multi-year funding application instructions, see section (e) below.

(c) To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal narrative reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

(d) In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization.

• Please note that organizations applying for livelihoods project funding must include both a market analysis and a beneficiary competency/capacity assessment as part of the proposal package. Please see the General NGO Guidelines for more details.

• Applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects must estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number, as applicable.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2015 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

(e) Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in one year (12-month) cycles for a period not to exceed three years (36 months) from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. Applicants should use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for the first year of a multi-year application. Multi-year funding applicants may use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposal narratives and budgets can be updated yearly upon submission of new noncompeting single year proposal narrative template with an updated budget, each year.

New page limits: Multi-year proposals using PRM’s multi-year template must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total; however, annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in one year (12- month) increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting single year proposal narrative and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Follow-on funding applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Follow-on year applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late submissions will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request single-year and multi-year funding proposal narrative templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

3. Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) Number and System for Award Management (SAM)

(a) Each applicant is required to: (i) be registered in SAM before submitting its application; (ii) provide a valid DUNS number in its application; and (iii) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active PRM award or an application or plan under consideration by PRM. No federal award may be made to an applicant until the applicant has complied with all applicable DUNS and SAM requirements and, if an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time the PRM award is ready to be made, PRM may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive a PRM award and use that determination as a basis for making a PRM award to another applicant.

(b) Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). Grants.gov registration requires a DUNS number and active SAM.gov registration. If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” tools and tips page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements.

(c) Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). We also recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

(d) When registering with Grants.gov, organizations must designate points of contact and Authorized Organization Representatives (AORs). Organizations based outside the United States must also request and receive an NCAGE code prior to registering with SAM.gov. Applicants experiencing technical difficulties with the SAM registration process should contact the Federal Service Desk (FSD) online or at 1-866-606-8220 (U.S.) and 1-334-206-7828 (International).

(e) Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

(f) If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at [email protected] or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

(g) It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure the appropriate registrations are in place and active. Failure to have the appropriate organizational registrations in place is not considered a technical difficulty and is not justification for an alternate means of submission.

(h) Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found here.

4. Submission Dates and Times

Announcement issuance date: Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Proposal submission deadline: Thursday, February 4, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

5. Intergovernmental Review – Not Applicable.

6. Funding Restrictions. Federal awards will not allow reimbursement of Federal Award costs without prior authorization by PRM.

7. Other Submission Requirements

(a) PRM Standardized Indicators: In an effort to streamline the proposal writing/reviewing process and better measure the impact of the Bureau’s work, PRM requires the use of standardized indicators in the health, protection, child protection, education, WASH, livelihoods, emergency shelter, nutrition and food security, and core relief items (non-food items) sectors. Applicants must fill in numerical and/or percentage targets for each indicator. Sphere standards should be used as targets, unless otherwise noted. Proposals must include all standardized indicators that apply to the program. Please refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of all standardized indicators that must be included.

(b) Applicant Vetting as a Condition of Award: Applicants for proposals in Kenya are advised that successful passing of vetting to evaluate the risk that funds may benefit terrorists or their supporters is a condition of award. Applicants may be asked to submit information required by DS Form 4184, Risk Analysis Information about their company and its principal personnel. Vetting information is also required for all sub-award performance on assistance awards identified by DOS as presenting a risk of terrorist financing. When vetting information is requested by the Grants Officer, information may be submitted on the secure web portal at https://ramportal.state.gov, via email to [email protected], or hardcopy to the Grants Officer. Questions about the form may be emailed to [email protected] Failure to submit information when requested, or failure to pass vetting, may be grounds for rejecting your proposal. The following clause shall be included in Section 9, Special Award Conditions, or as an addendum to the solicitation, whenever assistance is awarded after vetting:

• Recipient Vetting After Award: Recipients shall advise the Grants Officer of any changes in personnel listed in the DS Form 4184, Risk Analysis Information, and shall provide vetting information on new individuals. The government reserves the right to vet these personnel changes and to terminate assistance awards for convenience based on vetting results.

(c) Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity.

o Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

E. Application Review Information

1. Criteria: Eligible submissions will be those that comply with the criteria and requirements included in this announcement. In addition, the review panel will evaluate the proposals based on the following criteria:

(i) Problem Statement/Analysis

(ii) Program Description

(iii) Objectives and Indicators

(iv) Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

(v) Beneficiary Interaction and Accountability

(vi) Coordination

(vii) Transition and Capacity-Building

(viii) Management and Past Performance

(ix) Budget

2. PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel of at least three people will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced programmatic criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

3. Department of State Review Panels may provide conditions and recommendations on applications to enhance the proposed program, which must be addressed by the applicant before further consideration of the award. To ensure effective use of limited PRM funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify, and/or justify costs and program activities.

F. Federal Award Administration Information

1. Federal Award Administration. A successful applicant can expect to receive a separate notice from PRM stating that an application has been selected before PRM actually makes the federal award. That notice is not an authorization to begin performance. Only the notice of award signed by the grants officer is the authorizing document. Unsuccessful applicants will be notified following completion of the selection and award process.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements. PRM awards are made consistent with the following provisions in the following order of precedence: (a) applicable laws and statutes of the United States, including any specific legislative provisions mandated in the statutory authority for the award; (b) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR); (c) Department of State Standard Terms and Conditions of the award; (d) the award’s specific requirements; and (e) other documents and attachments to the award.

3. Reporting

Successful applicants will be required to submit:

(a) Program Reports: PRM requires program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. A program report is required within thirty (30) days following the end of each three month period of performance during the validity period of the agreement. The final program report is due ninety (90) days following the end of the agreement. The submission dates for program reports will be written into the cooperative agreement. Partners receiving multi-year awards should follow this same reporting schedule and should still submit a final program report at the end of each year that summarizes the NGO’s performance during the previous year.

The Performance Progress Report (SF-PPR) is a standard, government-wide performance reporting format. Recipients of PRM funding must submit the signed SF-PPR cover page with each program report. In addition, the Bureau suggests that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template and reference this template as being attached in block 10 of the SF-PPR. This template is designed to ease the reporting requirements while ensuring that all required elements are addressed. The Program Report Template can be requested by sending an email with only the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” (without the quotation marks) in the subject line to [email protected]

(b) Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement (January 30th, April 30th, July 30th, October 30th). The final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement. For agreements containing indirect costs, final financial reports are due within sixty (60) days of the finalization of the applicable negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA).

Reports reflecting expenditures for the recipient’s overseas and United States offices should be completed in accordance with the Federal Financial Report (FFR SF-425) and submitted electronically in the Department of Health and Human Services’ Payment Management System (HHS/PMS) and in accordance with other award specific requirements. Detailed information pertaining to the Federal Financial Report including due dates, instruction manuals and access forms, is provided on theHHS/PMS website.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

G. PRM Contacts

Applicants with technical questions related to this announcement should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

PRM Program Officer Wossie Mazengia: [email protected], 202-453-9380, Washington, D.C.; please include PRM Acting Program Officer Martha Marrazza on email correspondence ([email protected]).

PRM Program Officer Kristin Alderman: [email protected], 202-453-9377, Washington, D.C.; please include PRM Acting Program Officer Martha Marrazza on email correspondence ([email protected]).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa David Moore: [email protected], U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Deputy Refugee Coordinator for Kenya and Somalia Sarah Skorupski: [email protected], U.S. Embassy, Nairobi, Kenya.

Regional Horn Refugee Coordinator Assistant Sandra Bedoya-Hanson: [email protected], U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of U.S. Department of State.

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Source:: FY 2016 Notice of Funding Opportunity for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Ethiopia and Kenya

Categories: AFRICA