Valletta Migration Summit: “No part of the world can be a fortress. We should be open to legal migration.”

African and European Union leaders ended a two-day Summit on migration, agreeing on a number of measures, “to decisively and together manage migration flows in all its aspects.” They concluded a two-day Summit in Valletta, Malta, which culminated in their committing to address the root causes of irregular migration and forced displacement, by considering migration and mobility in their development, programming and implementation strategies.

According to the final declaration of the Valletta Summit on Migration, the common response of the African and European leaders will, among others, primarily focus on reducing poverty, promoting peace, good governance, the rule of law and respect for human rights, on supporting inclusive economic growth through investment opportunities and the creation of decent jobs, thus rekindling hope notably for the African youth.

In her opening remarks, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission pointed out the attitude of some European countries putting up a fortress approach to solving the migration issue. “There is no part of the world that can be a fortress. We should be open to legal migration,” Dr. Dlamini Zuma remarked, while extending deep appreciation to those European countries that have been working tirelessly to save the lives of the migrants and treating them in a humane and dignified manner.

Reacting to the supposed processing centres to be constructed for the migrants, the AU Commission Chairperson was very clear on the AU’s position: “The African Union is not in support of, and cannot endorse the establishment of the so-called processing centres in Africa. The processing centres, or whatever they may be called, are de facto detention centers that will constitute a serious violation of human rights and re-victimization of migrants. Especially women and children would be at great risks of falling prey to rape and human trafficking, including the trafficking in human organs.”

The idea of the processing centres was a key issue during the negotiations between the African and European Teams of negotiators. Putting into perspective the overall situation of migration in times of economic growth, AU Commission Chairperson quoted Dr. Carlos Lopes, Executive Secretary of the UN Economic Commission for Africa:

“In every moment of History growth has generated outward migrants from the same location. It is indeed happening with Chinese and Indians right now as it is in Africa. Growth spins the chances for a new life but its distribution, particularly at the early stages of a country take-off, is uneven and unpredictable. Those who see their neighbor with means and hope they do not have, venture out. It would have been absurd to propose bombing the boats that were sailing to South America full of migrants escaping the misfortunes of the two World Wars aftermath. These migrants were seeking better lives. Yet their countries were growing like never before, thanks amongst others to the Marshall Plan.”

The African and European leaders also agreed to strengthen international protection of migrants and step up assistance, acknowledging the need to facilitate legal migration and mobility for entrepreneurs, students and researchers.

An EU Emergency Trust Fund for Africa of €1.8 billion was launched to implement the agreed Valletta Summit on Migration Action Plan, aimed at addressing the root causes of the irregular migration and displaced persons in Africa. The Fund will benefit countries in the Sahel region and Lake Chad area; the Horn of Africa and North of Africa, said to be the major migration routes to Europe.

The AU Commission Chairperson underscored the need for a short, medium and long-term sustainable solutions, highlighting the fact the situation cannot be resolved through quick fixes. She called on Europe to partner with Africa in its Agenda 2063, whose thrust is in development and modernisation of the continent through industrialisation, skills training and promoting entrepreneurship that will create jobs for African young people lured by Europe in search of a better life.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of African Union Commission (AUC).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Valletta Migration Summit: “No part of the world can be a fortress. We should be open to legal migration.”

Categories: AFRICA

Military support to the fight against Ebola comes to a close

The final eight military personnel returned home this week as the operation came to its formal end. Over 1,500 British military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone to help oversee the construction of six UK funded treatment centres from scratch and trained over 4,000 Sierra Leonean and international health care workers.

Running from early September 2014, the 14 month operation saw a range of military personnel involved. Around 70 Royal Engineers deployed to design, oversee and support the construction of the Kerry Town Treatment Unit, other Ebola Treatment Centres and the Ebola Training Academy. Over 100 clinicians drawn from across the Defence Medical Services to provide medical support in the 20 bed Ebola Treatment Unit at Kerry Town.

RFA Argus and her three Merlin helicopters from 820 Naval Air Squadron and detachment of Royal Marines from 1 Assault Group Royal Marines played a vital role, providing much-needed equipment, supplies and food packages to remote areas of Sierra Leone.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said:

The work of more than 1,500 of our servicemen and women has made the crucial difference in the battle against this deadly disease. For more than a year they showed immense bravery and dedication in extremely tough conditions. They are a credit to our nation, they have saved a country.

Despite being declared Ebola free, the UK response continues to ensure a ‘resilient zero’. Post-Ebola, it is essential that we ensure the Sierra Leone has the capabilities, systems, and structures in place to respond to a future outbreak of Ebola or other public health emergency. This is being done through Ebola vaccines, reducing the risk of survivors transmitting to others and helping the country recover from the impact of the long battle.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Military support to the fight against Ebola comes to a close

Categories: AFRICA

Military support to the fight against Ebola comes to a close

The final eight military personnel returned home this week as the operation came to its formal end. Over 1,500 British military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone to help oversee the construction of six UK funded treatment centres from scratch and trained over 4,000 Sierra Leonean and international health care workers.

Running from early September 2014, the 14 month operation saw a range of military personnel involved. Around 70 Royal Engineers deployed to design, oversee and support the construction of the Kerry Town Treatment Unit, other Ebola Treatment Centres and the Ebola Training Academy. Over 100 clinicians drawn from across the Defence Medical Services to provide medical support in the 20 bed Ebola Treatment Unit at Kerry Town.

RFA Argus and her three Merlin helicopters from 820 Naval Air Squadron and detachment of Royal Marines from 1 Assault Group Royal Marines played a vital role, providing much-needed equipment, supplies and food packages to remote areas of Sierra Leone.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said:

The work of more than 1,500 of our servicemen and women has made the crucial difference in the battle against this deadly disease. For more than a year they showed immense bravery and dedication in extremely tough conditions. They are a credit to our nation, they have saved a country.

Despite being declared Ebola free, the UK response continues to ensure a ‘resilient zero’. Post-Ebola, it is essential that we ensure the Sierra Leone has the capabilities, systems, and structures in place to respond to a future outbreak of Ebola or other public health emergency. This is being done through Ebola vaccines, reducing the risk of survivors transmitting to others and helping the country recover from the impact of the long battle.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Military support to the fight against Ebola comes to a close

Categories: AFRICA

COP 21 – Africa’s energy and climate stakes at COP 21 and Beyond: Ask your questions LIVE to the Africa Progress Panel

The Africa Progress Panel (http://www.AfricaProgressPanel.org), chaired by former UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan will host an online press conference on Thursday November 19th at 14:00 GMT.

Journalists interested in participating in this online press conference will be able to ASK QUESTIONS LIVE VIA THE INTERNET.

The December 2015 talks in Paris on a new global climate treaty are approaching fast. Africa is already experiencing earlier and more damaging impacts of climate change than many other parts of the world. Bold, proactive leadership is required to harness effectively the opportunities now before us to transition to a low-carbon global economy. So what is at stake for Africa in the final climate change negotiations that begin in Paris on 30 November 2015? What are the implications of the outcome of COP 21 on Africa’s future growth and transformation trajectory? How should Africa best seize the opportunities at the heart of possible proactive responses to the global climate challenge? What are the APP’s core messages on these issues as the Paris conference approaches?

The Africa Progress Panel is chaired by former UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan. The other panel members are Michel Camdessus, former Managing Director of the IMF; Peter Eigen, founder of Transparency International; Bob Geldof, musician, businessman and campaigner; Graça Machel, social and political activist; Strive Masiyiwa, Chairman and Chief Executive of Econet Wireless; Linah Mohohlo, Governor of the Bank of Botswana; Olusegun Obasanjo, former President of Nigeria; Robert E Rubin, former Secretary of the US Treasury; and Tidjane Thiam, incoming Chief Executive of Credit Suisse.

The 2015 Africa Progress Panel report, “Power, People, Planet, Seizing Africa’s Energy and Climate Opportunities” details how climate change demands that we rethink the relationship between energy and development in Africa and globally.

Who: Caroline Kende-Robb is the Executive Director of the Africa Progress Panel

Max Bankole Jarrett, Deputy Director, Head of Communication, Africa Progress Panel

When: Thursday November 19th at 14:00 GMT (Time Converter: http://www.APO.af/UrSQfn)

Language: English

How it works: This service is FREE and only requires a computer connected to the internet.

REGISTER: http://www.apo-opa.com/application.php?L=E&vc=APP

Technical Contact:
sec.sg@apo-opa.org
+41 22 534 96 97

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Africa Progress Panel (APP).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: COP 21 – Africa’s energy and climate stakes at COP 21 and Beyond: Ask your questions LIVE to the Africa Progress Panel

Categories: AFRICA

Ethiopian Officials Study International Migration Law

IOM Ethiopia is conducting a two-day international migration law (IML) training on 12-13 November 2015 for 24 senior government officials in Addis Ababa.

The participants come from seven regions and two city administrations – Tigray, Afar, Amhara, Oromia, SNNPR, Somalia, Harari, Addis Ababa and Dire Dawa.

They include officials from Bureau of Women’s and Children Affairs, Police Commission, Bureau of Justice, Bureau of Labor and Social Affairs, and Federal Supreme Court child justice project.

Under the project funded by the European Union and UNICEF and in close partnership with the Ministry of Women Children and Youth Affairs, the training is the second provided for Ethiopian government officials and follows one held in February 2015.

IOM has organized four IML trainings in previous years. This year, however, the organization has given a special attention to migrant children – the number of whom is increasing. The IOM Missing Migrants Project highlights that between January and June 2015, of 93,542 irregular migrants en route to Europe, over 6,350 were unaccompanied minors.

The training includes an overview of international migration law, international child migration, issues associated with the Gulf of Aden/Red Sea migration route, competences and obligations of states and rights of migrant children, child trafficking and smuggling, definition of concepts, similarities and differences, as well as international frameworks. Current efforts to curb irregular migration, gaps and challenges for protection, return and reintegration in origin and transit locations are also highlighted.

The Ethiopian legal framework pertaining to migration and children – laws, policies, provisions, gaps in provision and implementation, opportunities for improving and effectively implementing the legal frameworks, current government and partner initiatives and recommended measures – are also discussed by experts from the Ministry of Justice.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Ethiopian Officials Study International Migration Law

Categories: AFRICA

USAID Extends Abyei Rehabilitation Initiative

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has extended funding for the IOM-USAID Abyei Rehabilitation Initiative through 2018. The programme is designed to mitigate the risk of conflict and promote recovery in Abyei Administrative Area, an oil-rich territory of more than 10,000 square kilometers contested by Sudan and South Sudan.

The programme began in January 2013 in response to unmet needs related to armed conflict, displacement and longstanding intercommunal tensions in the area. The first phase focused on reconstructing infrastructure in Abyei town, much of which was destroyed during an armed attack in May 2011.

While the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement mandated a referendum to determine Abyei’s permanent status, the vote has yet to be held due to disputes over who qualifies to vote and composition of the Abyei Referendum Commission.

Abyei’s disputed status has limited government resources for basic services. Rehabilitation Initiative infrastructure projects – such as rebuilding schools, health clinics and water points – provide a majority of public services in the area today.

In mid-2014, the programme shifted its focus toward reinvigorating economic activity in Abyei and improving access to livelihood and educational opportunities. With the support of partners, IOM and USAID conduct vocational and informal livelihood trainings, teach business skills and English literacy, and engage students in peacebuilding and conflict mitigation activities.

The trainings place a strong emphasis on supporting women and youth and represent the first educational opportunities for many of the students. As one female student explained, “I support five grandchildren in my house. Walking two hours to take this business class is nothing for me, because I need to learn these skills for them.”

To date, 670 people have completed the training courses. Most recently, 53 students graduated from five-week livelihood classes on food processing, baking, dairy production and basket weaving. At the end of the courses, the students formed business groups and received a business start-up kit. IOM and its partners will continue to provide daily mentorship to the groups over the next six months to ensure sustainable and successful businesses.

Many graduates of the courses now run thriving businesses in Abyei. One group established a wholesale trading company that has enabled them to save nearly 23,000 South Sudanese Pounds (SSP) – or approximately USD 1,500 – in just five months, using village savings and loans techniques learned in the business skills course.

Prior to this, these graduates had no access to savings. Their wholesale business is also supplying the local community with much-needed staples, such as flour and cooking oil, that were previously scarce in Abyei town.

Over the next two years, IOM and USAID will continue to focus on expanding livelihood opportunities, infrastructure projects and peacebuilding activities, as well as improving the agriculture and livestock sectors in Abyei.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: USAID Extends Abyei Rehabilitation Initiative

Categories: AFRICA

IOM Begins Vaccination of US-Bound Refugees in Rwanda

IOM has begun the vaccination in Kigali, Rwanda of refugees due to be resettled in the United States. The vaccinations are part of a three-day IOM medical health assessment process for the United States Refugee Resettlement Program (USRAP).

The refugees will receive multiple vaccinations, depending on their age, before they arrive in the US. The goal is to provide cost-effective public health interventions, improve refugee health and limit the number of vaccinations the refugees will need after they arrive in the US.

In addition to Rwanda, the overseas vaccination scheme is being implemented by IOM with USRAP in Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Thailand, Malaysia and Nepal. It will provide vaccinations to 56 per cent of US-bound refugees each year.

All refugees, regardless of age, will receive vaccinations for up to eight illnesses including measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough. In eight weeks, IOM will make a trip to Gihembe to provide boosters for many of the vaccines administered this week.

Mothers at the Bon Samaritain clinic, where IOM conducts the health assessments, could be seen clutching their children’s Ministry of Health “Mother-Child Booklets”, in which their children’s vaccinations are logged.

They received the booklets as part of the expanded programme on immunization at the Gihembe refugee camp. IOM nurses will review these documents and add the previously administered vaccines to the medical documents required for travel to the US.

In Rwanda, IOM currently processes about 2,000 medical health assessments for US-bound refugees per year. Following vaccination, IOM will work with camp medical staff to identify any adverse reactions.

IOM Rwanda Chief of Mission Catherine Northing said: “As the refugees get ready for their new homes and new lives, the vaccines will help protect them while still in Rwanda and ensure that they are healthy on arrival in the US.”

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: IOM Begins Vaccination of US-Bound Refugees in Rwanda

Categories: AFRICA

Consortium Applies New Approach to Security and Stabilization in Eastern DRC

IOM in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has signed an agreement with the Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation of the Netherlands to lead an ambitious Consortium that aims to work with local communities and governmental institutions towards the stabilization and peace of the country’s troubled eastern region.

IOM, the Catholic Organization for Relief and Development Aid (Cordaid), PAX and the International Cooperation Agency of the Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG-International) have joined forces to implement the 42-month, EUR 12.5 million program.

Although a regional peace agreement was signed in 2013, conflict continues in Eastern DRC. The Congolese people face hardship and insecurity and after decades of armed conflict, the ability of the state to respond has eroded. Issues such as land rights and ethnicity add to these problems and perpetuate cycles of conflict and insecurity.

As part of a new international approach to these long-standing problems, the Consortium’s objective is to improve security by addressing local conflict through democratic dialogues and by building the capacity of key state security institutions to better meet the needs of the people. The initial months will involve consultations with both the people and the government to fine-tune the design of the programme to the ever changing environment.

The Consortium plans to work directly with communities to renew and sustain dialogue processes that build trust and understanding between the diverse groups within Eastern DRC’s society. The Cellule Provinciale d’Appui à la Pacification in North Kivu and the Local Peace Initiatives in Ituri Province are to monitor the security and human rights situation and bring all members of society together to establish shared perspectives and seek non-violent resolutions of conflict.

“Security, particularly in Eastern DRC, is the most complex of all basic needs,” said Jean-Philippe Chauzy, IOM’s Chief of Mission in DRC. “To be achieved, it requires a shared perspective, contributions and active participation from all segments of society. By bringing communities together, the Consortium will act as a powerful catalyst for peace and stabilization.”

The Consortium also seeks to work together with the police, justice and local administration to improve their responsiveness and accountability to the people. A process called Results Based Financing will lay out indicators for performance for each of the institutions and if the population agrees that there is an improvement, a subsidy will be released on a quarterly basis.

The improved coordination and effectiveness of the security sector is also targeted through on-the-job training and coaching of the Conseils de Sécurité. In this forum, all security actors – including the police, justice, intelligence, administration and civil society – meet to decide on security matters.

A learning tool called benchmarking and hands-on expertise provided by (former) mayors from the Netherlands will be offered to help these forums analyze the security situation and make sound decisions regarding the security of the population.

“The combined expertise of these four organizations provides a unique opportunity to address local safety and security concerns in an integrated manner,” said Frédérique de Man, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Rwanda.

The programme intends to build on the United Nations’ International Security and Stabilization Support Strategy (ISSSS), which is the main vehicle for international support for DRC’s Stabilization and Reconstruction Plan for War Affected Areas (STAREC).

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Consortium Applies New Approach to Security and Stabilization in Eastern DRC

Categories: AFRICA

IOM, UNHCR Build Capacity of Libyan Partners to Save Lives of Migrants at Sea

IOM Tripoli and UNHCR have organized a second technical workshop and coordination meeting for Libyan partners on saving lives of migrants at sea. The workshop, which took place from 9-10 November in Tunis, follows an earlier workshop held in late July.

The meetings, funded by the European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department (ECHO), aim to improve the response capacities of Libyan authorities involved in operations related to the rescue of refugees and migrants off the Libyan coast.

This week’s workshop included 26 participants from the Libyan Coast Guard and Port Security Department, the Directorate for Combatting Illegal Migration (DCIM), the Libyan Red Crescent, and two representatives from the Libyan Ministry of Health.

The meeting provided the opportunity to share updates on the most recent developments regarding the increasing number of refugees and migrants rescued by the Libyan Coast Guard, amid deteriorating weather conditions. This is often due to unseaworthy vessels used by refugees and migrants, which capsize near the Libyan coastline.

The main objective of the second workshop was to further enhance coordination and cooperation among all actors involved in and responding to rescue at sea operations, as well as boost Libya’s capacity to save lives at sea and improve the humanitarian response to those rescued.

The workshops also aim to operationalize a Technical Working and Contact Group, once its Terms of Reference are agreed upon. This would then draw up Standard Operating Procedures for the rescue and disembarkation of refugees and migrants found in distress off the Libyan coast. The group would also identify training and equipment gaps, which could then be filled with the expertise and support of international organizations or individual member states.

IOM Libya Chief of Mission Othman Belbeisi noted: “There is an urgent need for better information management and information sharing related to rescue operations handled by the Libyan Coast Guard, particularly regarding the necessary coordination between them and the DCIM. The Technical Working Group will ensure better coordination among all actors involved.”

IOM and UNHCR are planning another meeting as part of the same ECHO-funded project early next year. Specialized training sessions may also be organized with the support of implementing partners in Libya to respond to the most pressing needs in terms of national response capacity.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: IOM, UNHCR Build Capacity of Libyan Partners to Save Lives of Migrants at Sea

Categories: AFRICA

IOM Welcomes Intercontinental Agreement to Manage African Migration to Europe

A roadmap to manage African migration to Europe, developed at an intercontinental summit in Malta between member states from the EU and Africa, has been welcomed by IOM’s Director General William Lacy Swing.

“The focus has been on saving migrant lives in the Mediterranean, but now, in addition, a joint commitment has emerged to tackle the underlying reasons so many people are on the move,” Ambassador Swing said.

“These include an arc of war from Africa to Asia that brings insecurity to communities, as well as crippling poverty and the undeniable impact of climate change that makes it ever harder for people to survive and thrive.”

The summit deliberations, at which Ambassador Swing was present, delivered a political declaration and an Action Plan to be backed up by an EU Trust Fund for Africa. At its heart the plan seeks to restore stability in migration by addressing the root causes of why so many people take the fateful decision to join the migratory route north.

The summit also expressed deep concern at the suffering, abuse and exploitation suffered by women and children, and “the unacceptable loss of life in the desert or at sea.”

Europe has seen an unprecedented number of arrivals this year, with 800,000 crossing by the dangerous sea routes with the help of smugglers. Along with the hardship to migrants and refugees, this is causing political strains between and within countries.

The inclusion in the Valletta summit political declaration that voluntary return is the preferred option over forced returns for those migrants who have no legal options to remain in Europe is welcomed by IOM.

IOM advocates strongly that when people are returned it should be, whenever possible, on the basis of free choice, carried out with dignity and include reintegration support upon arrival home.

During all-night negotiations between the EU and African states delegations saw intense focus on the issue of returns. The final accord saw both sides agree “to give preference to voluntary return and reaffirm that all returns must be carried out in full respect of human rights and human dignity.”

“The Malta decisions are a promising start on what will be a long road,” Ambassador Swing said. “They focus on a series of measures aimed at tackling the root causes of migration, which we very much welcome.”

The summit also recognized that there are “benefits of well-managed migration and mobility” between the two continents and that there is a shared responsibility of countries of origin, transit and destination to work together.

An important part of that work is “preventing and fighting migrant smuggling, eradicating trafficking in human beings” – both areas of concern to IOM, which has consistently advocated for a more concerted response.

“This has been a historic summit in many respects,” Ambassador Swing said. “It took place in Malta, where Africa and Europe meet and where so much of the history of the two continents was forged.”

“We hope the agreement hammered out here in a spirit of compromise leads to improvements in the lives of migrants, especially those who put themselves at such risk in crossing the Mediterranean.”

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of International Office of Migration (IOM).

Media files

Download logo

Source:: IOM Welcomes Intercontinental Agreement to Manage African Migration to Europe

Categories: AFRICA

Climate action in Seychelles: hundreds of participants join in the cleaning of North East beach

Several participants gathered in Anse Etoile for a cleaning operation under the initiative “Be for Climate action: Join us for ban zil pli prop” launched by the European Union in close collaboration with the Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change of the Republic of Seychelles.

H.E. Ms Marjaana SALL, Head of the European Union Delegation to the Republic of Seychelles said:

– “The objective of our climate action is clear: to encourage the citizens, in particular the young

generation, to actively engage in the fight against climate change around one motto ‘ ban zil pli

prop ‘, and to become aware of the harmful consequences of human activities over the

environment. Tackling climate change is a moral duty towards our children.”

The cleaning action in Anse Etoile has been organised by SYAH (SIDS Youth AIMS Hub) Seychelles,

a local Non-Government Organisation, in close collaboration with the Seychelles’ authorities. It was

followed by a sensitisation activity on waste disposal facilitated by the NGO Sustainability for

Seychelles.

The cleaning action in Seychelles is part of a larger campaign “Be for Climate action: Join us for

ban zil pli prop” of the European Union and its Member States, in collaboration with the Indian

Ocean Commission (IOC) in the framework of the European Year for Development and of the COP

21 Conference. The campaign which started on 21 October in Moroni (Comoros) consists in several

cleaning actions and sensitisation activities in Rodrigues, Seychelles (Mahe), Anjouan and Mohéli

(Comoros) and Mauritius.

The campaign aims at:Sensitising the population about the link between human activities and climate change.

Sensitising the population about waste, a common challenge faced by Small Island

Developing States in their way to sustainable development.

Limiting the negative impact of waste over the environment.

Promoting public awareness about better waste management.

Allowing the population to learn about the European Union action in Mauritius, Seychelles,

Comoros and in the region to fight against climate change

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of Mauritius.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Climate action in Seychelles: hundreds of participants join in the cleaning of North East beach

Categories: AFRICA

Climate action in Seychelles: hundreds of participants join in the cleaning of North East beach

Several participants gathered in Anse Etoile for a cleaning operation under the initiative “Be for Climate action: Join us for ban zil pli prop” launched by the European Union in close collaboration with the Ministry of Environment, Energy and Climate Change of the Republic of Seychelles.

H.E. Ms Marjaana SALL, Head of the European Union Delegation to the Republic of Seychelles said:

– “The objective of our climate action is clear: to encourage the citizens, in particular the young

generation, to actively engage in the fight against climate change around one motto ‘ ban zil pli

prop ‘, and to become aware of the harmful consequences of human activities over the

environment. Tackling climate change is a moral duty towards our children.”

The cleaning action in Anse Etoile has been organised by SYAH (SIDS Youth AIMS Hub) Seychelles,

a local Non-Government Organisation, in close collaboration with the Seychelles’ authorities. It was

followed by a sensitisation activity on waste disposal facilitated by the NGO Sustainability for

Seychelles.

The cleaning action in Seychelles is part of a larger campaign “Be for Climate action: Join us for

ban zil pli prop” of the European Union and its Member States, in collaboration with the Indian

Ocean Commission (IOC) in the framework of the European Year for Development and of the COP

21 Conference. The campaign which started on 21 October in Moroni (Comoros) consists in several

cleaning actions and sensitisation activities in Rodrigues, Seychelles (Mahe), Anjouan and Mohéli

(Comoros) and Mauritius.

The campaign aims at:Sensitising the population about the link between human activities and climate change.

Sensitising the population about waste, a common challenge faced by Small Island

Developing States in their way to sustainable development.

Limiting the negative impact of waste over the environment.

Promoting public awareness about better waste management.

Allowing the population to learn about the European Union action in Mauritius, Seychelles,

Comoros and in the region to fight against climate change

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of Mauritius.

Media files

Download logo

Source:: Climate action in Seychelles: hundreds of participants join in the cleaning of North East beach