Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage – Africa

UNESCO: New inscriptions concerning Africa by the 9th Session of the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (24 – 28 November 2014)

Composed of 24 States and elected by the General Assembly of the States Parties to the 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, the Intergovernmental Committee meets once every year. This year the Committee reviewed periodic reports submitted by 27 States Parties on their implementation of the Convention. The Committee decided also about new inscriptions. As to Africa the following proposals were approved

Two new inscriptions to the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

  • Kenya: Isukuti dance of Isukha and Idakho communities of Western Kenya

The Isukuti dance is a traditional celebratory performance practised among the Isukha and Idakho communities of Western Kenya. It takes the form of a fast-paced, energetic and passionate dance accompanied by drumming and singing

The male-child cleansing ceremony, performed among the Lango people of central northern Uganda, is a ritual for a male child believed to have lost his masculinity.

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Seven new inscription to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Rural women and, to a lesser extent, men living in the Arganeraie Biosphere Reserve in Morocco practise traditional methods to extract oil from the fruit of the argan tree. The oil has multiple uses in cooking, medicine and cosmetics, and is given as a wedding gift.

  • Mali: Coming forth of the masks and puppets in Markala

The coming forth of the masks and puppets is a ritual festivity practised among communities in Markala. During the dry season, young neophytes pass through rituals performed in a sacred wood next to the Niger River and characterized by masked dances and puppetry.

Joking relationships are a social practice performed to regulate social relationships and ease tensions among persons of different ethnolinguistic communities. Members are required to tell each other the truth, joke and play games together, and pool their respective assets, knowing that any dispute must be settled peacefully.

The ritual and ceremonies of Sebeïba are practiced by two communities living in Djanet in the first month of the Islamic lunar calendar. Male dancers and female singers compete to represent their communities during a nine-day contest.

  • Burundi: Ritual dance of the royal drum

The ritual dance of the royal drum combines powerful, synchronized drumming with dancing, heroic poetry and traditional songs. The dance includes at least a dozen drums, always in an odd number, arranged around a central drum in a semicircle.

  • Malawi: Tchopa, sacrificial dance of the Lhomwe people of southern Malawi

Tchopa is practised among Lhomwe communities in southern Malawi. The dance is usually performed during celebrations after good harvests and successful hunting trips and during offerings to ancestral spirits after calamities such as droughts and outbreaks of disease.

  • Mauritius: Traditional Mauritian Sega

Traditional Mauritian Sega is a performing art emblematic of the Creole community. Each solo singer improvises lyrics, while a frame drum, box rattle and triangle keep time and produce the rhythmic beat.

Read more at http://www.unesco.org/culture/ich/index.php?lg=en&pg=00011

Categories: AFRICA, Algeria, Burundi, CULTURE, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Niger | Tags: , ,

Gambia : UN Committee to review record on children’s rights

UN Committee to review Gambia’s record on children’s rights

GENEVA, Switzerland, January 8, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Gambia’s record on children’s rights will be reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) on Thursday 15 January in sessions that will be webcast live.

Gambia is one of the 194 states that have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child and so is required to undergo regular examinations of its record before the Committee of 18 independent experts.

 

Among the possible issues to be discussed by the CRC and the delegation from the Gambian Government are: setting the legal minimum age of marriage at 18; prohibition of corporal punishment; steps to prevent and eliminate sexual exploitation of children; sanctions and policies to combat and prohibit FGM; eliminating discrimination against children with disabilities; resources allocated to health care for children; provision of free primary education.

 

The full list of issues and Gambia’s report can be found here: http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/SessionDetails1.aspx?SessionID=825&Lang=en

 

The sessions will take place at Palais Wilson in Geneva from 10:00-13:00 (09:00-12:00 in Gambia) and 15:00-18:00 (14:00-17:00) on 15 January. They will be webcast at http://www.treatybodywebcast.org/.

 

The CRC’s concluding observations on Gambia and the other countries being reviewed – Cambodia, Turkmenistan, Jamaica, Colombia, Switzerland, Dominican Republic, Sweden, Mauritius, Tanzania, Uruguay and Iraq – will be published on 4 February here:

http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/SessionDetails1.aspx?SessionID=825&Lang=en

Source:: UN Committee to review Gambia’s record on children’s rights

Categories: AFRICA, African Press Organization, Gambia, POLITICS | Tags: ,

UN Committee to review Mauritius on children’s rights

GENEVA, Switzerland, January 8, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Mauritius’s record on children’s rights will be reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) on Wednesday 14 January and Thursday 15 January in sessions that will be webcast live.

 

Mauritius is one of the 194 states that have ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child and so is required to undergo regular examinations of its record before the Committee of 18 independent experts.

 

Among the possible issues to be discussed by the CRC and the government delegation from Mauritius are: impact of the National Human Rights Action Plan on implementation of the Convention, independence of the Office of the Ombudsperson for Children; status of the draft Children’s Bill; prohibition of corporal punishment; measures to prevent sexual exploitation of children; new adoption bill; development of inclusive education for children with disabilities; addressing low birth weight of babies, improving health of mothers; language of instruction in schools; treatment of children arrested or detained.

 

The full list of issues and Mauritius’s report can be found here: http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/SessionDetails1.aspx?SessionID=825&Lang=en

 

The sessions will take place from 15:00-18:00 (18:00-21:00 in Mauritius) on 14 January and 10:00-13:00 (13:00-16:00) on 15 January at Palais Wilson in Geneva. They will be webcast at http://www.treatybodywebcast.org/.

 

The CRC’s concluding observations on Mauritius and the other countries being reviewed – Cambodia, Turkmenistan, Gambia, Jamaica, Colombia, Switzerland, Dominican Republic, Sweden, Tanzania, Uruguay and Iraq – will be published on 4 February here:

http://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/treatybodyexternal/SessionDetails1.aspx?SessionID=825&Lang=en

Source:: UN Committee to review Mauritius on children’s rights

Categories: African Press Organization

Paper : Challenges for African women entrepreneurs in the performing arts and designer fashion sectors

Challenges for African women entrepreneurs in the performing arts and designer fashion sectors study by Yarri Kamara

The cultural and creative industries in sub-Saharan Africa in recent years have captured the attention of policy-makers who are increasingly aware of their real and potential contribution to economic growth and employment. These industries provide a possibility for creating employment and generating income for women, as well as giving women the space for creative expression; space that is not always afforded to women in sub-Saharan African societies.

Dundu Dole - Urban African Ballet by Marjorie Morris Lipan

Dundu Dole – Urban African Ballet by Marjorie Morris Lipan

This paper focuses on the challenges that African women cultural entrepreneurs face in the performing arts sector – notably theatre, dance and music – and in the designer fashion sector.

Read this paper in English at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0022/002294/229418e.pdf and in French at http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0023/002303/230304f.pdf in the UNESCO report on “Gender Equality, heritage and creativity”.

Suggested Book
Performing Africa
The jali–a member of a hereditary group of Mandinka professional performers–is a charismatic but contradictory figure. He is at once the repository of his people’s history, the voice of contemporary political authority, the inspiration for African American dreams of an African homeland, and the chief entertainment for the burgeoning transnational tourist industry. Numerous journalists, scholars, politicians, and culture aficionados have tried to pin him down. This book shows how the jali’s talents at performance make him a genius at representation–the ideal figure to tell us about the “Africa” that the world imagines, which is always a thing of illusion, magic, and contradiction.

Categories: AFRICA | Tags: , ,

Tanzania : IMF Executive Board Completes First PSI Review

IMF Executive Board Completes First PSI Review for Tanzania

DAR ES SALAAM, Tanzania, January 8, 2015/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund completed today the first review of Tanzania’s economic performance under the program supported by the Policy Support Instrument (PSI)1 and granted a waiver for the non-observance of the continuous assessment criterion on the non-accumulation of external arrears.

The PSI for Tanzania was approved by the Executive Board on July 16, 2014 (see Press Release No. 14/350). Tanzania’s program under the PSI supports the authorities’ medium-term objectives. These include: the maintenance of macroeconomic stability, the preservation of debt sustainability, and the promotion of more equitable growth and job creation.

Following the Board discussion, Mr. Min Zhu, Deputy Managing Director and Acting Chair, made the following statement:

“Macroeconomic developments in Tanzania remain favorable. Economic growth was strong during the first half of 2014 and is expected to remain close to 7 percent. Inflation remains in mid-single digits, consistent with the authorities’ target of 5 percent by June 2015.

“Performance under the Policy Support Instrument was satisfactory through June, but has deteriorated since and risks have risen, stemming from delays in disbursements of donor assistance and external nonconcessional borrowing, and shortfalls in domestic revenues. Against this backdrop, the authorities’ commitment to keep the program on track is welcome, and they have reaffirmed their intention to meet the budget deficit target and will review revenues and adjust expenditures accordingly in the context of the mid-year budget review. It will be critical to the business environment to address the governance issues raised by the IPTL case, which would also unlock donor assistance.

“It will be important to strengthen the coordination between fiscal and monetary policies. The conversion of monetary policy instruments to financing papers facilitated the front-loading of capital expenditures but complicated monetary policy implementation. It will be more effective and less disruptive to accommodate the planned expenditure through better planning to align spending and financing.

“The issue of domestic arrears, which continued to accumulate, needs to be addressed comprehensively and forcefully. Work to verify and eventually clear arrears to suppliers already incurred is ongoing. The authorities’ plan to prevent future arrears accumulation is appropriately ambitious and will require sustained implementation. Addressing arrears to pension funds and making government relations with them more transparent is also critical to their sustainability.”

1 The PSI is an instrument of the IMF designed for countries that do not need balance of payments financial support. The PSI helps countries design effective economic programs that, once approved by the IMF’s Executive Board, signal to donors, multilateral development banks, and markets the Fund’s endorsement of a member’s policies (see http://www.imf.org/external/np/exr/facts/psi.htm). Details on Tanzania’s PSI program are available at www.imf.org/tanzania.

Source:: IMF Executive Board Completes First PSI Review for Tanzania

Categories: AFRICA, African Press Organization, ECONOMY, Tanzania | Tags: , , ,

Call for Papers: State censorship and state sponsorship in contemporary African arts

Call for Papers: State censorship and state sponsorship in contemporary
African arts

Panel at the 6th European Conference on African Studies/ECAS 2015
Paris, 8-10 July 2015

Panel Abstract:
This panel features papers on state engagement in the field of contemporary
arts, whether to censor, critique, and prohibit, or to promote and
commission. Among the topics to be considered are state sponsorship of
heroic statuary, including the processes of selection for the commission
and the content, and public reactions to the processes and resultant art
objects; state sponsorship or engagement with art biennials or fairs, and
how these link to broader political and/or diplomatic initiatives or
relationships; and state sponsorship or censorship of specific works or
artists. The reaction of artists and of particular art works to state
censorship and/or to state sponsorship also fall within the scope of this
panel.

Panel chairs: Lisa Brittan and Gary Van Wyk

Please submit you paper proposal and abstract through the website of ECAS:
http://www.ecas2015.fr/art-activism-and-violence-in-the-postcolony/

More information on how to submit your abstract:
http://www.ecas2015.fr/how-to-submit-your-proposal/

Queries: Lisa Brittan and Gary Van Wyk, panel chairs
lisabrittan@icloud.com and vanwykgary@aol.com

Please note that conference fees, accommodation, and travel expenses are
not covered and must be secured by the participants.

Categories: AFRICA, Call for papers, CULTURE, RESEARCH | Tags: