Oct 142014
 

WASHINGTON, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — In April 2014, the world was horrified to learn that the Nigerian terrorist group Boko Haram had abducted approximately 270 girls from their school in Chibok, Nigeria. In the six months since, some girls have been reunited with their families, but most remain in captivity, and Boko Haram has continued to terrorize the region. This year alone, the group has abducted hundreds of men, women, girls and boys and killed 3,000 people in Nigeria. President Obama has directed that the U.S. government do everything it can to help the Nigerian government find and free the abducted girls and, more broadly, to combat Boko Haram in partnership with Nigeria, its neighbors, and other allies. This support takes many forms but the goal is singular: to dismantle this murderous group.

Advisory Support to the Nigerian Government

The United States is assisting the Nigerian government to undertake more concerted, effective, and responsible actions to ensure the safe return of those kidnapped by Boko Haram, including through on-the-ground technical assistance and expanded intelligence sharing.

Multi-Disciplinary Team

In May, the United States dispatched a multi-disciplinary team to Abuja to advise the Nigerians on how to secure the safe return of those kidnapped, encourage a comprehensive approach to address insecurity, and establish a capacity to respond more effectively in the future. These officials provide guidance to the Nigerian government on conducting a comprehensive response to Boko Haram that protects civilian populations and respects human rights.

The team includes civilian and humanitarian experts, U.S. military personnel, law enforcement advisors and investigators as well experts in hostage negotiations, strategic communications, civilian security, and intelligence. The team continues to facilitate and coordinate information sharing and the provision of assistance for survivors and their families.

Expanded Intelligence Sharing

The U.S. government also has provided the Nigerian government with Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to aid Nigeria’s efforts to locate the missing girls.

Sanctions Against Boko Haram

In recent years, we have helped isolate Boko Haram’s leaders by leveraging our own authority to designate them as terrorists and by encouraging the United Nations to do so as well.

In June 2012, the State Department designated Boko Haram’s top commanders as Specially Designated Global Terrorists under section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224. In June 2013, the State Department added Abubakar Shekau, Boko Haram’s official leader, to our Rewards for Justice Program and offered up to $7 million for information leading to his capture.

In November 2013, the State Department designated Boko Haram and Ansaru, a splinter faction, as Foreign Terrorist Organizations under Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended, and as Specially Designated Global Terrorists under section 1(b) of Executive Order 13224. This designation empowers U.S. law enforcement and the Treasury Department to pursue these violent extremist organizations.

The United States worked closely with Nigeria to pursue terrorist designations at the UN Security Council for Boko Haram, which were approved and took effect on May 22, 2014. These designations prohibit arms sales, freeze assets, restrict movement, and encourage regional cooperation.

Continued Engagement to Counter Boko Haram

The United States is committed to supporting efforts by Nigeria and its neighbors to combat the threat of Boko Haram more effectively and in a manner that respects human rights through a variety of assistance programs designed to advance regional cooperation, bolster rule of law, and strengthen security institutions.

President Obama announced Nigeria’s participation in the Security Governance Initiative (SGI) during the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in August. SGI is a new Presidential initiative in which the United States and Nigeria will work to improve security sector institution capacity to protect civilians and confront challenges and threats, with integrity and accountability. To support a longer term focus, SGI involves multi-year funding commitments of increased U.S. support and requires sustained, high-level leadership and commitment by partner countries to pursue policies in support of the agreed upon goals.

Nigeria is a partner in the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership, a U.S. government effort to enhance regional security sector capacity to counter violent extremism, improve country and regional border and customs systems, strengthen financial controls, and build law enforcement and security sector capacity.

The State and Defense Departments are launching a $40 million Global Security Contingency Fund for Cameroon, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria to counter Boko Haram. The program will provide technical expertise, training, and equipment to the four countries to develop institutional and tactical capabilities to enhance their respective efforts to counter Boko Haram, and to lay the groundwork for increased cross-border cooperation to counter Boko Haram.

We work closely with other international partners, including the United Kingdom, France, and Canada, to enable information-sharing, alignment, and coordination on international strategies and programs to counter such threats in the region.

Support to Populations Affected by Boko Haram

Boko Haram is inflicting untold hardship on the people of Nigeria, with repercussions for men, women, girls, and boys throughout northeast Nigeria. The United States provides assistance to affected populations, including support to health, water, and sanitation services; the delivery of emergency relief supplies; and protection services, including psycho-social support for survivors of Boko Haram violence. The United States further invests in helping Nigeria to build security and increase opportunity in northeast Nigeria, including through education programs for girls and boys; maternal and child health services; and programs to strengthen democracy and governance and counter violent extremism by engaging leaders across society, including women.

The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provides trauma counselling to survivors and their families, including those directly affected by the Chibok abduction, through a $4.5 million, five-year (2010-15) program. USAID also recently completed its third training for psycho-social support teams based in Borno–the locus of Boko Haram’s violence. The role of these social workers, health care providers, and other community members is to sensitize communities to prevent stigma against abductees when they return, and to provide psycho-social first aid to girls and their families.

USAID is starting two new programs that will address critical educational needs for both girls and boys in northern Nigeria. A $20-30 million crisis response program will provide basic education to internally displaced persons and others affected by the violence in the northeast. In addition, a flagship five-year, $120 million program will strengthen education systems so that they can provide greater access and improve reading among primary school children.

In support of the contributions women make to peace and prosperity, USAID is promoting women in leadership and peacemaking through a series of conferences and workshops. Training exercises in Kano and Sokoto states promoted tolerance across ethnic and religious lines through engagement with influential religious, traditional, and women leaders. Women participants came out with a plan to use “naming ceremonies” (common across most Nigerian cultures) to carry out campaigns against hate speech and electoral violence. Interfaith media dialogues discussed how women and other stakeholders can prevent electoral violence in the run up to the February 2015 elections and how women can contribute to Nigeria’s political and economic progress.

USAID is launching the Nigeria Regional Transition Initiative to improve stability and strengthen democratic institutions in northeast Nigeria. The initiative will focus on building the resistance of communities vulnerable to the effects of violent extremist organizations, weak governance, and insecurity through increased positive engagement between government and communities; increased access to credible information; and support to reduce youth vulnerability to violent extremist influences.

The State Department supports efforts to facilitate dialogue between local women activists and security-sector personnel and to highlight the role of female law-enforcement officers. State also supports a Hausa-language multi-media platform which includes a free-to-air satellite TV channel designed to serve northern Nigeria. The channel highlights the rich cultural diversity of northern Nigeria while offering programming with themes that reject political violence and violent extremism. It also includes programming intended to meet the needs of mothers with young children. One show highlights as role models women who have overcome obstacles and now own their own businesses or have obtained higher education. The objective is to show that any girl can grow up to be a strong contributor to her society.

Oct 142014
 

WASHINGTON, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

October 9, 2014

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-15-002

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number: 19.517

Announcement Issuance Date: Thursday, October 9, 2014

Proposal submission deadline: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. EST (noon Washington, DC time). Proposals submitted after this deadline or incomplete proposal packages will not be considered.

ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov (not GrantSolutions.gov). PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal several days early to allow time to address any technical difficulties that may arise. Please note that Monday, October 13, 2014 and Tuesday, November 11, 2014 are U.S. Federal holidays.

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Proposed Program Start Dates: January 1, 2015 – May 31, 2015

Duration of Activity: Program plans from 12 to 36 months will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed 36 months from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed 12 months in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12-month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see the Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International Organizations (IOs) should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. Rather IOs such as UN agencies and other Public International Organizations (PIOs) that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

Current Funding Priorities for refugees in Ethiopia and Kenya:

(a) PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for filling programming gaps in the Horn of Africa region as identified below.

While PRM encourages activities that include host communities, because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and durable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50% refugees. Please note that projects that do not address the protection/assistance gap(s) below will not be considered.

ETHIOPIA

Proposals must focus on one or more of the following:

Dollo Ado (Melkadida, Bokolmayo, and/or Buramino camps ONLY)

1. Health (reproductive health, maternal and child health/nutrition, mental health, psychosocial support, and/or assistance to persons living with disabilities)

2. Protection (prevention and response to gender-based violence (GBV) and/or child protection)

3. Education/Livelihoods[1] (primary education and/or vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, and that for Somali refugees has a clear link to eventual voluntary return)

Gambella

1. Protection (including assistance to unaccompanied or separated minors and/or persons living with disabilities)

2. Nutrition (maternal and child health/nutrition)

3. Livelihoods[1] (protection-focused projects; vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals)

Benishangul-Gumuz Refugee Camps

1. Livelihoods (vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals)

2. Energy and environmental management (household energy and fuel usage)

Tigray

1. Education/Livelihoods[1] (primary and/or vocational education/training that will help minimize onward migration and youth education)

KENYA

Proposals must focus on one or more of the following:

1. Protection (LGBTI; prevention and response to GBV; child protection; assistance to separated or unaccompanied minors, including safe shelters; and/or activities to address/prevent xenophobia)

2. Health (primary and mental health, including psychosocial support, reproductive health, and/or maternal and child health/nutrition; and/or assistance to persons living with disabilities)

4. Education/Livelihoods[1] (primary and/or vocational education/training that benefits both refugees and host nationals, and that for refugees has a clear link to voluntary repatriation)

(b) For both countries, proposals should be shared with UNHCR in advance of submission and must be developed in full consultation with UNHCR to ensure coherence with its overall comprehensive planning for refugee operations. If PRM awards funding and then circumstances subsequently preclude implementation in urban areas, PRM will work with you to determine how to proceed.

(c) PRM Standardized Indicator Initiative:

Health: Proposals focusing on health in camp based/returnee settings must include a minimum of one of the four following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Number of consultations/clinician/day (Target: Fewer than 50 patients per clinician per day).

• Measles vaccination rate for children under five (Target: 95% coverage).

• Percentage of deliveries attended by a skilled birth attendant in a health care facility (Target: 100%).

• Percentage of reporting rape survivors given post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with 72 hours (Target: 100%).

Proposals focusing on health in urban settings must include a minimum of one of the six following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Capacity-building: number of health care professionals/administrators trained on providing health services to beneficiary populations.

• Referrals: number of beneficiaries referred to appropriate services, and percentage of those referred who were able to get needed services.

• Community Outreach: number of beneficiaries who received targeted messages on their rights and health-related services available to them.

• Health Staffing: number of total consultations per health care provider, disaggregated by refugee/national, sex, and age.

• Patient Satisfaction: percentage of beneficiary patients receiving primary and emergency care who express satisfaction with services received.

• Post Exposure Prophylaxis: percentage of reporting beneficiary rape survivors given PEP within 72 hours (Target: 100%).

NGO proposals seeking to fund service provision may include the following indicators as appropriate:

• Primary Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving primary health care assistance.

• Emergency Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving care for trauma or sudden illness.

Proposals should include custom health indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Health

• Sphere Handbook: http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook/

• UNHCR Health Guidelines, Policies, and Strategies: http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49c3646cdd.html

• OFDA NGO Guidance (pages 96-110): http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1866/guidelines_for_proposals_2012.pdf

Livelihoods: Proposals focusing on livelihoods in camp based/returnee settings must include a minimum of one of the three following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

Camp-Based/Returnee Settings:

• Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

• (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

Proposals focusing on livelihoods in urban settings must include a minimum of one of the eight following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

Urban:

• Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) in urban settings who are placed in jobs by completion of the project period. Note: A chart should be provided reflecting the length of employment for program participants.

• (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

• The percentage of sampled host community employers who are able to identify at least two skill-sets (e.g., carpentry, embroidery) among program beneficiaries living in their municipality.

• The percentage of sampled host community employers who are able to describe accurately the procedures for hiring program beneficiaries.

• The percentage of sampled urban program beneficiaries who:

o Are able to describe accurately the procedures for receiving permits to conduct business.

o Apply for and receive for business permits.

• The percentage of sampled urban program beneficiaries who are economically self-reliant, as measured by self-reporting of household consumption and income sources.

Proposals should include custom livelihoods indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Livelihoods

• USAID/OFDA Guidelines for Proposals, October 2012 (pgs. 82-96)

• Women’s Refugee Commission, Preventing Gender Based Violence, Building Livelihoods: Guidance and Tools for Improved Programming

• Minimum Economic Recovery Standards, 2nd ed. Washington, DC, USA: The SEEP Network, 2010. http://communities.seepnetwork.org/econrecovery

• Emergency Market Mapping and Analysis Toolkit. (EMMA) Practical Action Publishing. 2010. www.emmatoolkit.info (In French as of 2011.)

• Local Economic Recovery in Post-Conflict: Guidelines. Geneva: ILO, 2010.

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/documents/instructionalmaterial/wcms_141270.pdf

(d) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the aforementioned sectors.

(e) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards.

(f) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of potentially vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively. NOTE: PRM partners must now complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template, section 3a) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys (children, adolescents, and youth)); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). A gender analysis is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(g) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO (refer to Eligible Applicants section above) working in the above mentioned areas although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• A working relationship with UNHCR and/or current UNHCR funding. Proposals must include a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities (this letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address and should include any UNHCR co-funding for the proposed activities and/or similar refugee activities);

• A proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• Evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• Projects in protracted refugee situations and multi-year funding applications must include (1) concrete steps that will be taken during the program period to support the eventual transition of activities to government ministries, local NGOs, or development actors, (2) the estimated timeframe for the transition, and (3) what obstacles might inhibit the transition;

• A budget that is appropriate for meeting the objectives and demonstrates co-funding by non-U.S. government sources;

• Where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas available online at http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/187237.pdf;

• Appropriate targeting of beneficiaries in coordination with UNHCR and other relevant organizations; and

• Inclusion of persons living with disabilities within the targeted population.

(h) Country Specific Instructions

• Ethiopia: Proposals for activities must be accompanied by a letter from the UNHCR Addis Ababa Office showing endorsement of the proposed activities and inclusion on the Government of Ethiopia’s Agency for Refugee and Returnee Affairs’ (ARRA) accountability matrix (3W matrix).

• Kenya: Proposals for activities must be accompanied by a letter from the UNHCR Nairobi Office showing endorsement of the proposed activities and inclusion on the respective camp’s accountability matrix (3W matrix). The UNHCR Nairobi letter should also acknowledge coordination with the relevant UNHCR sub-office.

Funding Limits: Project proposals may not exceed $1,500,000 per year or they will not be accepted.

As stated in the PRM General NGO Guidelines, PRM looks favorably on cost-sharing efforts and seeks to support projects with a diverse donor base and/or resources from the submitting organization.

Proposal Submission Requirements: Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements (http://test.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html).

Please also note the following highlights:

• Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). To register with Grants.gov, organizations must first receive a DUNS number and register with the System for Award Management (SAM) at www.sam.gov which can take weeks and sometimes months. We recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

• Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

• If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov, please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726 (in the U.S.) or +1-606-545-5035 (international callers). Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate. All such problems must be reported well before the application deadline.

• Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found at: http://fa.statebuy.state.gov/content.asp?content_id=161&menu_id=68 )

Proposal Content, Formatting and Template: This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization. PRM strongly encourages multilateral support for humanitarian programs.

• PRM now asks applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects to estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this new requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. Government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2014 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in 12-month cycles for a period not to exceed 36 months from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. These can be updated yearly upon submission of continuation applications. Applicants should note that they may use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for this application, which is different from the single year template. Multi-year funding applicants may also use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 30 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 25 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total; however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in 12- month increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Continuation applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Continuation applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late continuation applications will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request multi-year funding and continuation application templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

Reports and Reporting Requirements:

Program Reporting: PRM requires quarterly and final program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. It is highly suggested that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM-recommended program report template. To request this template, send an email with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line to PRM’s NGO Coordinator.

Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement; a final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

Proposal Review Process: PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced proposal evaluation criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

PRM may request revised proposals and/or budgets based on feedback from the panel. PRM will provide formal notifications to NGOs of final decisions taken by Bureau management.

Applicant Vetting as a Condition of Award: Applicants for programs in Kenya are advised that successful passing of vetting to evaluate the risk that funds may benefit terrorists or their supporters is a condition of an award for Kenya. Applicants may be asked to submit information required by DS Form 4184, Risk Analysis Information (attached to this solicitation) about their organization and its principal personnel. Vetting information is also required for all sub-award performance on assistance awards identified by the U.S. Department of State as presenting a risk of terrorist financing. When vetting information is requested by the Grants Officer, information may be submitted on the secure web portal at https://ramportal.state.gov, via Email to RAM@state.gov, or by hardcopy to the Grants Officer. Questions about the form may be emailed to RAM@state.gov. Failure to submit information when requested, or failure to pass vetting, may be grounds for rejecting your proposal. The following clause shall be included in Section 9, Special Award Conditions, or as an addendum to the solicitation, whenever assistance is awarded after vetting:

• Recipient Vetting after Award: Recipients shall advise the Grants Officer of any changes in personnel listed in the DS Form 4184, Risk Analysis Information, and shall provide vetting information on new individuals. The government reserves the right to vet these personnel changes and to terminate assistance awards for convenience based on vetting results.

Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated Bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, and podium signs must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity. Sub-recipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the sub-recipient agreement indicating that using the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

PRM Points of Contact: Should NGOs have technical questions related to this announcement, they should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. (Note: Responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.)

PRM Senior Program Officer Chris Upchurch (Ethiopia): UpchurchCM@state.gov, 202-453-9384, Washington, DC. Please include PRM Program Assistant Lin’An Bartlett on email correspondence (BartlettL@state.gov).

PRM Program Officer Linda Johnson (Kenya): JohnsonLM@state.gov, 202-453-9306, Washington, DC. Please include PRM Program Assistant Lin’An Bartlett on email correspondence (BartlettL@state.gov).

Regional Refugee Coordinator for the Horn of Africa Bindi Patel: PatelBK@state.gov, U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Deputy Refugee Coordinator for Kenya and Somalia Sarah Skorupski: SkorupskiSF@state.gov, U.S. Embassy, Nairobi, Kenya.

[1] Livelihood/IGA programs should conduct a risk assessment of proposed activities to ensure that activities do not negatively impact the protection needs of the beneficiary population. Organizations should also consider undertaking a market mapping and/or analysis to understand what opportunities exist and how much the market can bear.

Oct 142014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Human rights defenders, political activists, bloggers and media professionals have been under increasing attack from armed groups in Libya since mid-May, when fighting between rival factions intensified in and around Benghazi and later erupted in Tripoli, UN Human Rights Chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein warned Tuesday.

High Commissioner Zeid said UN human rights staff had received numerous reports of intimidation, harassment, abductions and murder of members of civil society, causing some human rights defenders to flee the country while others have curtailed their activism or gone into hiding, seeking protection for themselves and their families. Individuals have been shot in the street while going to work or coming out of mosques after prayers. Many have received text messages or have been the subject of social media posts threatening them or their families with death, abduction or rape.

“The work of civil society activists, journalists and human rights defenders is particularly crucial in the context of the ongoing conflict in Libya,” High Commissioner Zeid said. “Victims of human rights violations and abuses in Libya rely on these important actors to document and draw attention to their plight. The climate of fear created by such attacks, coupled with the total impunity enjoyed by the perpetrators, threatens to silence the few independent voices emerging from within the country.”

In Benghazi, 10 people were murdered in a single day on 19 September, including two prominent young civil society activists, Tawfik Bensaud, 18, and Sami al-Kawafi, 17. Since May, a number of other prominent public figures have been killed in the city, including newspaper editor Muftah Abu Zeid and lawyer and human rights activist Salwa Bugaighis. In Derna, East of Benghazi, lawyer Usama al-Mansuri was killed on 6 October, apparently after publicly criticizing a declaration by armed groups in the town pledging allegiance to the so-called ISIL.

Similarly, in Tripoli, since July a number of activists and other public figures have been abducted, received threats or had their homes looted or burned. One prominent human rights defender received text messages warning him to stop his advocacy work or else his children would be abducted and killed.

Women activists are particularly vulnerable and pressured to abandon public roles. One rights advocate reported that she had received several calls from armed groups warning that if she continued writing on women’s rights, she and her children would be killed. She and her family have since left the country. In another case a human rights advocate and lawyer who had taken part in a public debate on women’s rights received anonymous phone calls and text messages warning her that she would be abducted and killed.

Several human rights and political activists have also been targeted on social media. In one case, an activist was abducted soon after he was threatened on Facebook.

Media professionals also continue to be targeted. A journalist in Tripoli reportedly left the country after receiving death threats on social media, as well as threats against his family. Another was abducted for four days in September. On 10 October, Mu’adh al-Thlib, a journalist with al-Aseema Television, was abducted in Tripoli and released three days later. On 8 October, al-Mu’tasem al-Warfalli, a journalist with the Libya al-Watan radio station, was shot dead in Benghazi.

“I condemn these attacks, which are taking place with impunity, with police officers, prosecutors and judges themselves being targeted by armed groups,” High Commissioner Zeid said. He urged the Libyan authorities to take all possible measures to undertake prompt, thorough and impartial investigations, to hold those found responsible to account, and to ensure an effective remedy for victims.

The High Commissioner added that the authorities should also do everything in their power to ensure adequate protection of victims, witnesses and officials supporting the administration of justice, as efforts continue towards establishing a sustainable ceasefire and political dialogue.

Zeid warned the armed groups exercising effective control on the ground in Libya that their members and leadership are accountable under Libyan and international law for the abuses they are committing or failing to stop.

“Attacks against civilians are war crimes,” Zeid stressed, noting that the International Criminal Court continues to have jurisdiction over such crimes in Libya.

On 27 August, the Security Council adopted resolution 2174 on the situation in Libya, deciding that asset freeze and travel ban measures shall apply to listed individuals or entities that plan, commit, or direct acts that violate international human rights and humanitarian law, or that constitute human rights abuses.

Oct 142014
 

Nashville, Tennessee, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — A United Methodist Communications colaborou com a Chocolate Moose Media e a iHeed para criar um vídeo de animação para a África Ocidental que desmistifica ideias erradas sobre a transmissão do ébola e promove a sua prevenção. O vídeo pode ser transferido gratuitamente em http://www.ebolavideo.org.

Logo : http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/umc.jpg

Screenshot : http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/photos/141013umc.jpg

“O nosso objetivo é fornecer educação que resulte numa melhor compreensão para prevenir infeções” disse o Reverendo Larry Hollon, Diretor-executivo da United Methodist Communications. “O ébola está a ganhar terreno nas comunidades pobres onde a desconfiança, a resistência a cuidados adequados e a falta de conhecimento sobre o vírus estão amplamente disseminados. A vantagem da igreja é ter uma rede de líderes que vivem nas regiões afetadas e em quem os habitantes confiam.”

A United Methodist Communications (http://www.umcom.org), a agência de comunicações global da Igreja Metodista Unida, está a usar várias abordagens, incluindo o envio de SMS para o clero na Serra Leoa e na Libéria. Os comentários feitos por líderes de confiança incentivam a colaboração com os programas de saúde.

A agência forneceu o financiamento parcial para que a Chocolate Moose Media (http://www.chocmoose.com) criasse o vídeo. A produtora executiva foi a iHeed (http://www.iheed.org), uma empresa inovadora na educação de saúde móvel.

“Criei o que espero que seja um vídeo persuasivo para prevenir a disseminação do ébola” disse o fundador da Chocolate Moose Media e Realizador premiado, Firdaus Kharas. “A minha abordagem é combinar a animação com a persuasão não coerciva, fazendo com que os africanos falem às suas próprias famílias alargadas.”

Este vídeo, que poderá ser transferido para reprodução local, será distribuído por todos os parceiros para chegar ao maior número de pessoas possível. Os canais de distribuição incluem organizações internacionais, organizações não governamentais, a sociedade civil, igrejas e as redes sociais, utilizando a hashtag #Ebolavideo.

“A combinação de uma fraca infraestrutura de saúde, níveis de educação inconsistentes e falta de preparação fez com que esta epidemia se tornasse uma ameaça global”, disse o Dr. Kunal D. Patel, Diretor médico da iHeed. “Os meios de comunicação digitais podem preencher as lacunas existentes. Aliada a tecnologias como a de telemóveis, cinemas, projetores e tablets, as informações em formato de filme animado podem ajudar.”

A Igreja Metodista Unida está a responder, de várias outras maneiras, num esforço conjunto com o respetivo Comité de Socorro e Assistência (o United Methodist Committee on Relief), os líderes da Igreja Metodista Unida na África ocidental e os quadros de saúde regionais, instalações de saúde confessionais e outros. Visite http://www.umc.org/ebola.

De acordo com a Organização Mundial de Saúde, desde 3 de outubro, foram relatados 7470 casos de ébola (http://goo.gl/ni3P1M), com 3431 mortes na Guiné, na Libéria e na Serra Leoa.

O ébola é transmitido aos humanos pelos animais selvagens e propaga-se através da transmissão de pessoa a pessoa. O contacto com o corpo de uma pessoa morta também pode contribuir para a transmissão.

Distribuído pela APO (African Press Organization) em nome da United Methodist Communications.

Contacto:

Natalie Bannon

nbannon@umcom.org

+1 (615) 742-5413

Oct 142014
 

GAROWE, Somalia, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The United Nations, the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD), Ethiopia in its capacity as the Chair of the IGAD Council of Ministers, and the European Union (EU) welcomed the agreement signed today between the Federal Government of Somalia and Puntland State of Somalia to resume relations and work together on peace and state-building priorities.

“We welcome the agreement reached today between the Federal Government of Somalia and Puntland State of Somalia. This agreement is an important step forward in the path towards peace- and state-building for all Somalis. Puntland with its 16 years of experience in state building and governance has much to contribute to building a strong, peaceful, federal, democratic and united Somalia. Many crucial steps must be jointly taken in the coming months, including reviewing and implementing a Federal constitution and holding elections in 2016. We stand ready to support the implementation of this agreement, including through the New Deal Somali Compact. Somalia’s international partners remain committed to supporting the nation’s peace and state-building agenda in full respect of the Provisional Federal Constitution”.

Oct 142014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Thomas Mvubahe Bigaba, an IOM staffer in Goma in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), is a passionate singer when he is not working with internally displaced people in North Kivu.

Thomas’ band has produced a Zouk song about IOM’s mission to the DRC and IOM is asking DRC’s national radio to air its catchy beat countrywide.

IOM also will post Thomas’ recording on its website and Facebook page. The song’s title: “IOM, Always Near the Vulnerable!”

Please download MP3 of the song here: https://soundcloud.com/iom-drc/iom | Lyrics

Oct 142014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM Ethiopia has distributed essential non-food aid (NFIs) to 560 internally displaced households in Halobiyo, Kebele, Babile Woreda, in the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia. …

Oct 142014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — In a new Libya Situation Report this week, IOM notes that the devastating violence of recent months in the country has left some 200,000 migrant workers vulnerable with many in need of immediate evacuation assistance.

“As the security situation in Libya continues to deteriorate, there have been a large number of third country nationals (TCNs) trapped inside Libya as the borders between Libya and Egypt/Tunisia remain practically closed to them,” the report notes.

“Without valid travel documents and confirmed airline reservations, the authorities will not allow migrants to cross the border. Many also do not have sufficient means to organize their onward travel to their country of origin,” it adds.

The report goes on to explain that these obstacles are reflected “in the extraordinarily high numbers of migrants arriving on Italian shores during this summer.”

“Migrants who are destitute risk getting into overcrowded and dilapidated boats. This has led to the deaths of more than 2,000 migrants at sea and hundreds of bodies washed on Libyan shores in recent weeks,” it adds.

IOM says efforts are being made by the Libyan Coast Guard, which on October 2 rescued 190 migrants near the coastal town of Garabulli, some 60 kilometres from Tripoli. On the same day 167 migrants on board a boat in distress were saved by a Greek tanker about 90 miles north of Benghazi.

IOM Libya continues to track stranded migrants who wish to receive repatriation support through the IOM network. In the past two weeks, IOM booked 43 Sudanese on an Afriqiyah Airways outbound flight to Khartoum. One Yemeni and 11 Nepalese were also evacuated by land to the Tunisian border and then by air to their home countries. Another group of 22 stranded Nigerians were airlifted home via Cairo.

IOM Tripoli also is helping migrants to return home from Tripoli’s Mitiga Airport. It organizes the issuance and/or renewal of travel documents by liaising with concerned embassies in either Egypt, Tunisia or Libya. With most foreign representatives absent from the Libyan capital, the provision of valid travel documents is a major challenge both administratively and logistically.

Oct 142014
 

Nashville, Tennessee, October 14, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — United Methodist Communications collaborated with Chocolate Moose Media and iHeed to create an animation for West Africa that dispels myths about how Ebola is spread and promotes prevention. The video can be downloaded free at http://www.ebolavideo.org.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/umc.jpg

Screenshot: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/photos/141013umc.jpg

“Our goal is to provide education that leads to better understanding to prevent infections,” said the Rev. Larry Hollon, chief executive of United Methodist Communications. “Ebola gains foothold in poor communities where mistrust, resistance to proper care and lack of understanding of the virus and is widespread. The church’s advantage lies in its network of trusted leaders who live in the affected regions.”

United Methodist Communications (http://www.umcom.org), the global communications agency of The United Methodist Church, is using several approaches, including providing text messages to clergy in Sierra Leone and Liberia. Commentaries by trusted leaders encourage cooperation with health programs.

The agency provided partial funding for Chocolate Moose Media (http://www.chocmoose.com) to create the video. The executive producer is iHeed (http://www.iheed.org), a mobile-health-education innovator.

“I have created what I hope will be a compelling video to prevent the spread of Ebola,” said Chocolate Moose Media founder and award-winning director Firdaus Kharas. “My approach is to combine animation with non-coercive persuasion by having Africans speak to their own broader family.”

Accessed through download for local playback, all partners will distribute the video to reach as many as possible. Distribution channels include international organizations, non-governmental organizations, civil society and churches and through social media using #Ebolavideo.

“Through a combination of weak health infrastructure, inconsistent levels of education and unpreparedness, this epidemic has become a global threat,” said Dr. Kunal D. Patel, medical director of iHeed. “Digital media can fill the gaps. In combination with technologies such as mobile phones, cinemas, projectors and tablets, animated information can help.”

The United Methodist Church is responding in a number of other ways in a joint effort by the United Methodist Committee on Relief, West African United Methodist church leaders and regional health boards, denominational health facilities, and others. Visit http://www.umc.org/ebola.

According to the World Health Organization, 7,470 cases of Ebola had been reported as of Oct. 3 (http://goo.gl/ni3P1M), with 3,431 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Ebola is transmitted to humans from wild animals and spreads through person-to-person transmission. Contact with the body of a deceased person can also play a role in transmission.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of the United Methodist Communications.

Contact:

Natalie Bannon

nbannon@umcom.org

+1 615 742-5413

Oct 132014
 

JUBA, South Sudan, October 13, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Mrs. Zainab Hawa Bangura has concluded her first visit to South Sudan with a Joint Communique with the government that outlines clear steps they will take to prevent and address sexual violence crimes. Sexual violence is a consistent characteristic of the conflict and is being perpetrated by all the parties.

The Special Representative met with President Salva Kiir at the beginning and the end! of her visit, and held extensive consultations with relevant Ministers as well as the Army and Police. She also met with the Chairman of the South Sudan Human Rights Commission, women’s groups, community leaders, service providers, journalists and UN staff.

The Special Representative travelled to Bentiu, the capital of Unity state, to engage with the local commander of the Sudan People´s Liberation Army (SPLA), government authorities, UN staff, humanitarian workers and survivors of sexual violence.

“What I witnessed in Bentiu is the worst I have seen in my almost 30 years in dealing w ith this issue. This is because of the combination of chronic insecuri! ty, unimaginable living conditions, acute day-to-day protection concerns and rampant sexual violence,” said SRSG Bangura. “The bodies of women and children are the battleground of this conflict. In the words of a woman activist I met: “It is not just about rape, it is to inflict unimaginable pain and destruction,” SRSG Bangura continued.

Sexual violence is a problem that pre-dates the December 2013 crisis and has been greatly exacerbated by the escalation of the conflict. Following the December crisis there has been an additional dimension of sexual violence attacks and reprisals on an alarming scale. There are also grave concerns of sexual violence perpetrated along ethnic lines with attacks fuelling reprisals and a cycle of recrimination and revenge.

The Special Representative condemns these atrocities and appeals to the parties to stop the violence immediately. She reminds parties to the conflict, including government forces and opposition, that they cannot declare war on their own people and ultimately there must be accountability for these crimes.

She also stressed that the humanitarian cost of the conflict will continue to rise until there is a viable peace agreement between the parties. “The message from the women of South Sudan to their political leaders is very clear: end this war!” the SRSG Bangura said.

The Special Representative also remains concerned about the lack of services for victims of sexual violence and the lack of reporting of this crime to security, judicial, and social welfare actors due to the closure of government offices, malfunctioning police services and because of the social stigma associated with sexual violence. All these factors contribute to a climate of impunity. UN staff stressed that critical shortfalls in funding have significantly hampered service delivery.

“The international community cannot leave survivors to fend for themselves. Now is the time to step up and help South Sudan put an end to these atrocities,” the Special Representative urged.

The newly signed agreement outlines critical priority areas for action including ensuring medical, psychosocial and legal assistance to victims; addressing impunity, security and justice sector reform, and ensuring that sexual violence crimes are explicitly addressed in the peace process and as an aspect of the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement.

“My Office and the UN system are committed to helping the government and people of South Sudan put an end to sexual violence in conflict in the country, and we stand ready to support them in any way necessary to end the horrible devastation of this crime,” noted SR SG Bangura.

The Special Representative also met with Riek Machar leader of the Sudan People´s Liberation Movement (Opposition) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to begin discussions on concrete measures that the opposition must take to prevent sexual violence by their forces and in areas under their control.