FY 2014 Funding Opportunity Announcement for NGO Programs Benefiting Refugees in Chad and Cameroon

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Funding Opportunity Announcement

Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration

April 16, 2014

Funding Opportunity Number: PRM-PRMOAPAF-14-014

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number:

19.517 – Overseas Refugee Assistance Programs for Africa

Announcement issuance date: Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Proposal submission deadline: Friday, May, 16, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. noon EDT. Proposals submitted after this deadline will not be considered.

**ADVISORY: All applicants must submit proposals through the website Grants.gov. PRM strongly recommends submitting your proposal early to allow time to address any difficulties that may arise.**

If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher.

Proposed program start dates: August 1, 2014-September 15, 2014

Eligible Applicants: (1) Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; (2) Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with IRS, other than institutions of higher education; and (3) International Organizations. International multilateral organizations, such as United Nations agencies, should not submit proposals through Grants.gov in response to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. Multilateral organizations that are seeking funding for programs relevant to this announcement should contact the PRM Program Officer (as listed below) on or before the closing date of the funding announcement.

Duration of Activity: 12 to 24 months

Program plans from 12 to 24 months will be considered. Applicants may submit multi-year proposals with activities and budgets that do not exceed 24 months from the proposed start date. Actual awards will not exceed 12 months in duration and activities and budgets submitted in year one can be revised/updated each year. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. In funding a project one year, PRM makes no representations that it will continue to fund the project in successive years and encourages applicants to seek a wide array of donors to ensure long-term funding possibilities. Please see Multi-Year Funding section below for additional information.

Current Funding Priorities for refugees in Chad and Cameroon:

PRM will prioritize funding for proposed NGO activities that best meet the Bureau’s priorities for refugees in Chad and Cameroon as identified below.

(a) Proposed activities should primarily support Sudanese refugees residing in the 13 camps in eastern Chad; Central African refugees in the five camps in southern Chad or in UNHCR-designated host communities; or Central African refugees residing in eastern Cameroon. Because of PRM’s mandate to provide protection, assistance, and sustainable solutions for refugees and victims of conflict, PRM will consider funding only those projects that include a target beneficiary base of at least 50% refugees.

(b) Proposals must focus on the following sectors:

• Health (including reproductive health)

• Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH)

• Livelihoods

• Protection

o Prevention of and Response to Gender-based Violence

o Psychosocial Support

o Child Protection, to include secondary education for Sudanese refugees

Country Specific Instructions

(1) Chad

• Proposals should focus on Sudanese refugees in the 13 camps in eastern Chad and/or Central African refugees in the nine camps or UNHCR-designated host communities in southern Chad.

• Proposals may include work in the following areas: Primary health care, including reproductive health; secondary education; prevention of and response to gender-based violence; WASH; and livelihoods.

• Proposals should include a well-developed plan for training and building the capacity of local staff and service providers as well as building refugee self-sufficiency.

• Proposal should include a transition plan for long term sustainability of programming.

(2) Cameroon

• Proposals should focus on new Central African refugees residing in eastern Cameroon. Proposals may include work in the following: prevention of and response to gender-based violence.

(c) PRM Standardized Indicator Initiative:

Health: Proposals focusing on health in camp based settings must include a minimum of one of the four following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

• Number of consultations/clinician/day (Target: Fewer than 50 patients per clinician per day).

• Measles vaccination rate for children under five (Target: 95% coverage).

• Percentage of deliveries attended by a skilled birth attendant in a health care facility (Target: 100%).

• Percentage of reporting rape survivors given post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with 72 hours (Target: 100%).

NGO proposals seeking to fund service provision may include the following indicators as appropriate:

• Primary Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving primary health care assistance.

• Emergency Care: number and percentage of beneficiary patients, by sex and age, receiving care for trauma or sudden illness.

Proposals should include custom health indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Health

• Sphere Handbook: http://www.sphereproject.org/handbook/

• UNHCR Health Guidelines, Policies, and Strategies: http://www.unhcr.org/pages/49c3646cdd.html

• OFDA NGO Guidance (pages 96-110): http://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1866/guidelines_for_proposals_2012.pdf

Livelihoods: Proposals focusing on livelihoods in camp-based settings must include a minimum of one of the three following indicators and should try to include as many of the other indicators as are relevant:

Camp-Based Settings:

• Number of project beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) receiving training on appropriate skills as determined by market and livelihood assessments. This may include language and skills training, entrepreneurship building, financial literacy, business support services, job placement and apprenticeship schemes, and/or legal aid.

• Number and percentage of program participants, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) reporting higher household income level by end of project period as compared to the pre-project baseline assessment.

• (Temporary Employment) Number of beneficiaries, disaggregated by gender and population (refugee, national) participating in cash or food for work programs.

Proposals should include custom livelihoods indicators in addition to the relevant standardized indicator(s).

Key Resources – Livelihoods

• USAID/OFDA Guidelines for Proposals, October 2012 (pgs. 82-96)

• Women’s Refugee Commission, Preventing Gender Based Violence, Building Livelihoods: Guidance and Tools for Improved Programming

• Minimum Economic Recovery Standards, 2nd ed. Washington, DC, USA: The SEEP Network, 2010. http://communities.seepnetwork.org/econrecovery

• Emergency Market Mapping and Analysis Toolkit. (EMMA) Practical Action Publishing. 2010. www.emmatoolkit.info (In French as of 2011.)

• Local Economic Recovery in Post-Conflict: Guidelines. Geneva: ILO, 2010.

http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/documents/instructionalmaterial/wcms_141270.pdf

(d) Proposals must have a concrete implementation plan with well-conceived objectives and indicators that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and reliable, time-bound, and trackable (SMART), have established baselines, and include at least one outcome or impact indicator per objective; objectives should be clearly linked to the sectors.

(e) Proposals must adhere to relevant international standards for humanitarian assistance. See PRM’s General NGO Guidelines for a complete list of sector-specific standards including new guidance on proposals for projects in urban areas.

(f) PRM strongly encourages programs that target the needs of vulnerable and underserved groups among the beneficiary population (women; children; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex (LGBTI) individuals; older persons; the sick; persons with disabilities; and other minorities) and can demonstrate what steps have been taken to meet the specific and unique protection and assistance needs of these vulnerable groups effectively. NOTE: PRM partners must now complete a gender analysis (see PRM proposal template, section 3a) that briefly analyzes (1) gender dynamics within the target population (i.e., roles, power dynamics, and different needs of men and women, girls and boys); (2) associated risks and implementation challenges for the project posed by those dynamics; and (3) how program activities will mitigate these protection risks and be made accessible to vulnerable groups (particularly women and girls). A gender analysis is a requirement prior to PRM making a final funding award.

(g) PRM will accept proposals from any NGO working in the above mentioned sectors although, given budgetary constraints, priority will be given to proposals from organizations that can demonstrate:

• a working relationship with UNHCR, current UNHCR funding, and/or a letter of support from UNHCR for the proposed activities and/or overall country program (this letter should highlight the gap in services the proposed program is designed to address);

• a proven track record in providing proposed assistance both in the sector and specified location;

• evidence of coordination with international organizations (IOs) and other NGOs working in the same area or sector as well as – where possible – local authorities;

• a strong transition plan, where feasible, involving local capacity-building;

• where applicable, adherence to PRM’s Principles for Refugee Protection in Urban Areas available online at http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/187237.pdf.

• a budget that demonstrates co-funding by non-U.S. government sources.

Funding Limits: Project proposals must not be less than $250,000 and not more than $2.5 million or they will be disqualified. As stated in PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, PRM looks favorably on cost-sharing efforts and seeks to support projects with a diverse donor base and/or resources from the submitting organization.

Proposal Submission Requirements: Proposals must be submitted via Grants.gov (not via GrantSolutions.gov). If you are new to PRM funding, the Grants.gov registration process can be complicated. We urge you to refer to PRM’s General NGO Guidelines “New to PRM Funding” section for information and resources to help ensure that the application process runs smoothly. PRM also strongly encourages organizations that have received funding from PRM in the past to read this section as a refresher. Applicants may also refer to the “Applicant Resources” page on Grants.gov for complete details on requirements (http://test.grants.gov/web/grants/applicants/applicant-resources.html).

Please note the following highlights:

• Do not wait until the last minute to submit your application on Grants.gov. Organizations not registered with Grants.gov should register well in advance of the deadline as it can take up to two weeks to finalize registration (sometimes longer for non-U.S. based NGOs to get the required registration numbers). To register with Grants.gov, organizations must first receive a DUNS number and register with the System for Award Management (SAM) at www.sam.gov which can take weeks and sometimes months. We recommend that organizations, particularly first-time applicants, submit applications via Grants.gov no later than one week before the deadline to avoid last-minute technical difficulties that could result in an application not being considered. PRM partners must maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which they have an active federal award or an application under consideration by PRM or any federal agency.

• Applications must be submitted under the authority of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) at the applicant organization. Having proposals submitted by agency headquarters helps to avoid possible technical problems.

• If you encounter technical difficulties with Grants.gov please contact the Grants.gov Help Desk at support@grants.gov or by calling 1-800-518-4726. Applicants who are unable to submit applications via Grants.gov due to Grants.gov technical difficulties and who have reported the problem to the Grants.gov help desk, received a case number, and had a service request opened to research the problem, should contact the relevant PRM Program Officer to determine whether an alternative method of submission is appropriate.

• Pursuant to U.S. Code, Title 218, Section 1001, stated on OMB Standard Form 424 (SF-424), the Department of State is authorized to consolidate the certifications and assurances required by Federal law or regulations for its federal assistance programs. The list of certifications and assurances can be found at: https://www.statebuy.state.gov/fa/Documents/Listofoverseascertsandassurances.pdf.

Proposal Content, Formatting and Template: This announcement is designed to accompany PRM’s General NGO Guidelines, which contain additional administrative information on proposal content and formatting, and explain in detail PRM’s NGO funding strategy and priorities. Please use both the General NGO Guidelines and this announcement to ensure that your proposal submission is in full compliance with PRM requirements and that the proposed activities are in line with PRM’s priorities. Proposal submissions that do not meet all of the requirements outlined in these guidelines will not be considered.

PRM strongly recommends using the proposal and budget templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Please send an email, with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line, to PRM’s NGO Coordinator. Single-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 20 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 15 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total however annexes cannot be relied upon as a key source of program information. The proposal narrative must be able to stand on its own in the application process.

To be considered for PRM funding, organizations must submit a complete application package including:

• Proposal reflecting objectives and indicators for each year of the program period.

• Budget and budget narrative for each year of the program period.

• Signed completed SF-424.

In addition, proposal submissions to PRM should include the following information:

• Focus on outcome or impact indicators as much as possible. At a minimum, each objective should have one outcome or impact indicator. Wherever possible, baselines should be established before the start of the project.

• To increase PRM’s ability to track the impact of PRM funding, include specific information on locations of projects and beneficiaries (GPS coordinates if possible).

• Proposals should outline how the NGO will acknowledge PRM funding. If an organization believes that publicly acknowledging the receipt of USG funding for a particular PRM-funded project could potentially endanger the lives of the beneficiaries and/or the organization staff, invite suspicion about the organization’s motives, or alienate the organization from the population it is trying to help, it must provide a brief explanation in its proposal as to why it should be exempted from this requirement.

• The budget should include a specific breakdown of funds being provided by UNHCR, other USG agencies, other donors, and your own organization. PRM strongly encourages multilateral support for humanitarian programs.

• In FY 2014, PRM is asking applicants whose proposals address gender-based violence (GBV) through their projects to estimate the total cost of these activities as a separate line item in their proposed budgets. PRM’s budget template document has been updated to reflect this new requirement.

• Gender analysis (See above. Required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Code of Conduct (required before an award can be made).

• Copy of the organization’s Security Plan (required before an award can be made).

• Proposals and budgets should include details of any sub-agreements associated with the program.

• Most recent Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement (NICRA), if applicable.

• NGOs that have not received PRM funding since the U.S. government fiscal year ending September 30, 2004 must be prepared to demonstrate that they meet the financial and accounting requirements of the U.S. government by submitting copies of 1) the most recent external financial audit, 2) proof of non-profit tax status including under IRS 501 (c)(3), as applicable, 3) a Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number, and 4) an Employer ID (EIN)/Federal Tax Identification number.

• Organizations that received PRM funding in FY 2013 for activities that are being proposed for funding under this announcement must include the most recent quarterly progress report against indicators outlined in the cooperative agreement. If an organization’s last quarterly report was submitted more than six weeks prior to the submission of a proposal in response to this funding announcement, the organization must include, with its most recent quarterly report, updates that show any significant progress made on objectives since the last report.

Multi-Year Funding: Applicants proposing multi-year programs should adhere to the following guidance:

Applicants may submit proposals that include multi-year strategies presented in 12-month cycles for a period not to exceed 24 months from the proposed start date. Fully developed programs with detailed budgets, objectives and indicators are required for each year of activities. These can be updated yearly upon submission of continuation applications. Applicants should note that they may use PRM’s recommended multi-year proposal template for this application, which is different from the single year template. Multi-year funding applicants may also use PRM’s standard budget template and should submit a separate budget sheet for each project year. Multi-year proposals using PRM’s templates must be no more than 30 pages in length (Times New Roman 12 point font, one inch margins on all sides). If the applicant does not use PRM’s recommended templates, proposals must not exceed 25 pages in length. Organizations may choose to attach work plans, activity calendars, and/or logical frameworks as addendums/appendices to the proposal. These attachments do not count toward the page limit total.

Multi-year applications selected for funding by PRM will be funded in 12- month increments based on the proposal submitted in the initial application as approved by PRM. Continued funding after the initial 12- month award requires the submission of a noncompeting continuation application and will be contingent upon available funding, strong performance, and continuing need. Continuation applications must be submitted by the organization no later than 90 days before the proposed start date of the new award (e.g., if the next project period is to begin on September 1, submit your application by June 1). Continuation applications are submitted in lieu of responding to PRM’s published call for proposals for those activities. Late continuation applications will jeopardize continued funding.

Organizations can request multi-year funding and continuation application templates by emailing PRM’s NGO Coordinator with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line.

Reports and Reporting Requirements:

Program reporting: PRM requires quarterly and final program reports describing and analyzing the results of activities undertaken during the validity period of the agreement. It is highly suggested that NGOs receiving PRM funding use the PRM recommended program report template. To request this template, send an email with the phrase “PRM NGO Templates” in the subject line to PRM’s NGO Coordinator.

Financial Reports: Financial reports are required within thirty (30) days following the end of each calendar year quarter during the validity period of the agreement; a final financial report covering the entire period of the agreement is required within ninety (90) days after the expiration date of the agreement.

For more details regarding reporting requirements please see PRM’s General NGO Guidelines.

Proposal Review Process: PRM will conduct a formal competitive review of all proposals submitted in response to this funding announcement. A review panel will evaluate submissions based on the above-referenced proposal evaluation criteria and PRM priorities in the context of available funding.

PRM may request revised proposals and/or budgets based on feedback from the panel. PRM will provide formal notifications to NGOs of final decisions taken by Bureau management.

Branding and Marking Strategy: Unless exceptions have been approved by the designated bureau Authorizing Official as described in the proposal templates that are available upon email request from PRM’s NGO Coordinator, at a minimum, the following provision will be included whenever assistance is awarded:

• As a condition of receipt of this assistance award, all materials produced pursuant to the award, including training materials, materials for recipients or materials to communicate or promote with foreign audiences a program, event, project, or some other activity under this agreement, including but not limited to invitations to events, press materials, event backdrops, podium signs, etc. must be marked appropriately with the standard U.S. flag in a size and prominence equal to (or greater than) any other logo or identity. Subrecipients and subsequent tier sub-award agreements are subject to the marking requirements and the recipient shall include a provision in the subrecipient agreement indicating that the standard, rectangular U.S. flag is a requirement. In the event the recipient does not comply with the marking requirements as established in the approved assistance agreement, the Grants Officer Representative and the Grants Officer must initiate corrective action.

PRM Points of Contact: Should NGOs have technical questions related to this announcement, they should contact the PRM staff listed below prior to proposal submission. Please note that responses to technical questions from PRM do not indicate a commitment to fund the program discussed.

PRM Program Officer: Kristen Frost, FrostKL@state.gov, (202) 453-9383, Washington, D.C.

Regional Refugee Coordinator: Mary Eileen Earl, EarlME2@state.gov, (235) 22-51-70-09 ext. 4323, U.S. Embassy, N’Djamena.

Source: APO

Categories: African Press Organization | Leave a comment

On the Occasion of the Republic of Zimbabwe’s National Day

WASHINGTON, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Press Statement

John Kerry

Secretary of State

Washington, DC

April 17, 2014

On behalf of President Obama and the American people, I send best wishes to the people of Zimbabwe as you celebrate 34 years of independence on April 18.

The United States remains committed to the people of Zimbabwe. We will continue to support all Zimbabweans as you seek a more democratic, prosperous, and healthy future.

We look forward to strengthening our partnership with the Zimbabwean people to achieve our common goals of peace, security, and prosperity.

Source: APO

Categories: African Press Organization | Leave a comment

AU PSC, at its 429th meeting held on 16 April 2014, adopted a decision on the situation in Guinea Bissau

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Peace and Security Council of the African Union (AU), at its 429th meeting held on 16 April 2014, adopted the following decision on the situation in Guinea Bissau:

Council,

1. Takes note of the briefing provided by the Director for Political Affairs of the AU Commission on the post-election situation in Guinea Bissau. Council also takes note of the statement made ??by the Representative of Ghana, in its capacity as the Chair of Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS);

2. Recalls its previous communiqués and press statements on the situation in Guinea Bissau, in particular communiqués PSC/AHG/BR/1(CCCXCVII), adopted at its 397th meeting, held at the level of Heads of State and Government, in New York, on 23 September 2013, and PSC/PR/COMM.1(CDVIII) of 13 December 2013;

3. Expresses its deep appreciation to the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), notably Nigeria and the ECOWAS Commission for developing an elaborate package of assistance to the Electoral Management Bodies (EBMs) in Guinea Bissau, in particular, the Technical Support Agency for the Management of the Electoral Process (GTAPE) which greatly facilitated the successful holding of Presidential and Legislative elections in Guinea Bissau on 13 April 2014. Council welcomes the peaceful atmosphere in which the elections took place in a free, fair and transparent manner;

4. Further expresses its appreciation to the AU Commission and the AU Election Observation Mission (AUEOM), which was led by former President Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique, for its support to Guinea Bissau and its people, which has significantly contributed towards the completion of the transition. Also expresses its appreciation to the international partners for providing support to the election process in Guinea Bissau and appeals to them to continue to support Guinea Bissau to emerge from the crisis;

5. Commends the political parties, independent candidates and the people of Guinea Bissau for signing a consensual code of conduct and abiding by its provisions to allow the electoral process to take place in a calm and peaceful environment throughout the electioneering campaigns;

6. Welcomes the progress made in Guinea Bissau’s transitional process, a country with a long history of unconstitutional changes of government which have greatly weakened the country’s democratic institutions. Council acknowledges that the general elections of 13 April 2014 mark a significant step towards the full restoration of constitutional order in Guinea Bissau;

7. Calls on political parties, independent candidates and the people of Guinea Bissau to continue to remain calm and to allow the electoral process to be completed in accordance with the Constitution of Guinea Bissau. Council warns all potential spoilers not to undermine the ongoing electoral process in the country and stresses that spoilers of the process will be held accountable for their actions;

8. Decides, in the light of the successful holding of Presidential and Legislative elections in Guinea Bissau on 13 April 2014, that upon announcement of the presidential winner and assumption of office by the new President in accordance with the Constitution of Guinea Bissau, the country will be invited to resume its participation in the AU’s activities in line with paragraph 6 of communiqué PSC/PR/COMM(CCCXVIII) adopted by the PSC at its 318th meeting of 17 April 2012;

9. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

Source: APO

Categories: African Press Organization | Leave a comment

AU PSC, at its 429th meeting, held on 16 April 2014, was briefed on the upcoming elections in Egypt

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The Peace and Security Council of the African Union (AU), at its 429th meeting, held on 16 April 2014, was briefed on the upcoming elections in Egypt by the Department of the Political Affairs of the AU Commission.

Council took note of the briefing. Council recalled all its legal instruments on unconstitutional changes of government, as well as its communiqué PSC/AHG/COMM.3(CDXVI) on the situation in Egypt, adopted at its 416th meeting held on 29 January 2014, and agreed to review the overall situation in Egypt following the presentation of the report to be submitted by the AU High-Level Panel for Egypt.

Council further encouraged the Department of Political Affairs to continue its engagement in support of democratization efforts in Africa.

Council agreed to remain seized of the matter.

Source: APO

Categories: African Press Organization | Leave a comment

Orange celebrates the 10 millionth Orange Money customer

DAKAR, Sénégal, April 17, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Stéphane Richard, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Orange (http://www.orange.com), gave a bonus to the 10 millionth customer of Orange Money in Dakar, Senegal: Ms Kanny G., who had gone to an Orange Money outlet to open an account, was surprised to learn that she had won a smartphone with an Orange Money credit of 100,000 FCFA (152 euros).

Logo : http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/orange-logo.jpg

Photo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/index.php?level=picture&id=999 (Stéphane Richard (on the right), Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Orange, gave a bonus to the 10 millionth customer of Orange Money in Dakar, Senegal)

“Orange Money is a revolution in terms of customer experience, and the appeal of this service is the best proof that we made the right choice when we decided to offer mobile payment services in 2008. I am very proud to be in Dakar today to meet our 10 millionth Orange Money customer. While making a strong contribution to economic and social development, mobile financial services also represent a major growth engine in Africa and the Middle East as well as in Europe for Orange,” said Stéphane Richard.

Orange Money has seen exponential growth since it was launched. The service is now available in 13 countries: Botswana, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt (under the name Mobicash), Guinea, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritius, Niger, Senegal and Uganda. In 2013, more than 2.2 billion euros in transactions were conducted through Orange Money. The ten million mark has just been hit, and in some countries, such as Côte d’Ivoire, more than 40% of all Orange customers have an Orange Money account.

The success of the Orange Money service is closely linked to that fact that it meets strong expectations by people in Africa and the Middle East. It adapts to lifestyles in countries where only a minority of inhabitants have bank accounts yet the majority have a mobile phone. It makes life easier for users every day by giving them a way to keep their money safe or by saving time on all of their transactions.

Subscription to Orange Money is free of charge. After opening their accounts, customers have access to three types of services:

- money transfers, allowing them to send and receive money by phone;

- easy remote payment for goods and services, whether to pay bills from partner companies (e.g. water, electricity or TV service) or to buy airtime;

- financial services enabling them to wire money to and from a bank account, pay wages, etc.

Orange Money is a major source of innovation for the Group, which is broadening its offer by developing an ecosystem of services and partnerships. For example, Orange recently launched several flagship projects:

- Orange Money International Transfer for mobile-to-mobile money transfers between Côte d’Ivoire, Mali and Senegal, which has achieved a market share of 15% in a matter of months;

- a partnership with Visa in Botswana, giving Orange Money subscribers easy access to new transaction options at Orange outlets, online and in licensed vending machines;

- a partnership being deployed with Total on distribution and merchant payment in service stations for greater access to Orange Money.

A number of other projects are planned for 2014: the opening of additional corridors for international transfers, the creation of services for customers with bank accounts, and the development of new interfaces for smartphones, which are becoming more widespread. Moreover, the Group is continuing its efforts to build up its distribution network, especially in the most remote regions, as proximity is a key success factor for Orange Money.

Orange’s ambition is to support the anticipated growth of the mobile payment market in the coming years. The Group also plans to expand its range of affordable financial and banking services and give as many people as possible access to them. Its objective is to turn them into indispensable services in the years to come, just as voice services, text-messaging and Internet access are today.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Orange.

Press contacts:

France

01 44 44 93 93

Mylène Blin, mylene.blin@orange.com

Tom Wright, tom.wright@orange.com

UK

Vanessa Clarke

vanessa.clarke@orange.com

+44 (0)7818 848 848

About Orange

Orange (http://www.orange.com) is one of the world’s leading telecommunications operators with sales of 41 billion euros in 2013 and has 165,000 employees worldwide at 31 December 2013, including 102,000 employees in France. Present in 30 countries, the Group has a total customer base of more than 236 million customers at 31 December 2013, including 178 million mobile customers and 15 million broadband internet customers worldwide. Under the Orange Business Services brand, Orange is also one of the world leaders in providing telecommunication services to multinational companies.

Orange is listed on NYSE Euronext Paris (ORA) and on the New York Stock Exchange (ORAN).

For more information (on the web and on your mobile): www.orange.com, www.orange-business.com, www.orange-innovation.tv or to follow us on Twitter: @presseorange.

Orange and any other Orange product or service cited in this press release are trademarks held by Orange or Orange Brand Services Limited.

Source: APO

Categories: African Press Organization | Leave a comment

Proudly powered by WordPress Theme: Adventure Journal by Contexture International.