Many Africas: Images of Africa, African Art, and African Material Culture in the Museums

African images and art in museums

Araujo, Ana-Lucia <aaraujo@Howard.edu> writes on February 24, 2013: I am trying to putting together a panel for the next meeting of the African Studies Association to be held in Baltimore from November 21 to November 24, 2013: http://www.africanstudies.org/index.cfm?FuseAction=Abroad.ViewLink&Parent_ID=9E03FB90-26B9-564D-D66B771C7C118F7C&Link_ID=C5713355-26B9-564D-D62BD587666A5AB6

“Many Africas: Images of Africa, African Art, and African Material Culture in the Museum” convened by Ana Lucia Araujo

This panel explores how images of the African continent and African material culture are presented in museums in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. The panel will focus on four aspects of the presence of Africa in the museum. First, by examining a variety of visual images that allegedly represent Africa during the pre-colonial period, the panel will explore how over the last twenty years museum exhibitions in the Americas and Europe have introduced the history of the African continent, very often in order to portray the enslavement of African individuals. Second, the panel will discuss how African artifacts, objects, and artworks collected during the colonial period were appropriated by European museums (including Britain, Belgium, and France), which over the last years are attempting to transform and develop new narratives about these colonial collections. Third, the panel aims to investigate how South American museums (especially Brazil) are also incorporating the African continent in their collections and exhibitions in order to respond to the claims for recognition of the populations of African descent. Finally, the panel also explores the images and narratives of Africa developed in African museums with the aim of understanding to which extent these institutions offer alternative views of Africa or if the images they convey are largely based on Western models.

If you wish to join the panel, please send me a brief proposal (200 words) and a brief bio (200 words), email and contact information no later than March 10, 2013 to Ana Lucia Araujo at analucia.araujo@gmail.com<mailto:analucia.araujo@gmail.com>

Please make sure that you receive a confirmation email from me, if you don’t, please check it again, by sending me an email. Ana Lucia Araujo Associate Professor of History Director of Graduate Studies Howard University Department of History Phone number : 202-806-9365

Via H-AfrArts H-Net Network for African Expressive Culture E -Mail: H-AFRARTS@H-NET.MSU.EDU http://www2.h-net.msu.edu/~artsweb/

Categories: AFRICA, CULTURE

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