Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — While South Sudan continues to grapple with widespread insecurity and mass displacement, IOM is continuing to build the new country’s limited administrative capacity.

IOM Juba this week hosted a five-day training on document examination, imposter recognition, and risk profiling for 22 officers from South Sudan’s Directorate of Nationalities, Passports and Immigration (DNPI).

The goal of the training was to improve the skills and capacity of immigration officers from Juba International Airport and the two most frequented border crossings into Uganda – Nimule and Kaya.

IOM is currently working closely with DNPI and international experts to develop an immigration processes and procedures manual and a set of border management training modules. These are crucial tools to ensure that border management policy decisions are understood and implemented by officers in the field. IOM constructed seven new border posts in South Sudan in 2013 and 2014.

To date, IOM delivered 27 technical trainings benefitting 675 officers. Topics addressed have included human-trafficking and smuggling, detection of forged documents, investigative skills, interviewing skills and overall migration management and policy principles.

The trainings and the construction of seven new border posts throughout the country were funded by the Government of Japan.

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM has delivered emergency aid to more than 100 people burned out of their homes when fire raged through a displacement camp in the town of Bosaso in the Puntland area of Somalia.

A blaze, possibly started by a cooking fire, broke out on August 16th at the 55 Bush settlement in Bosaso, which lies in the Bari region of northeast Somalia.

IOM worked with local authorities and partner agencies to provide emergency aid to more than 100 people whose makeshift shelters were destroyed. The traditional shelters are called “buuls” and are made of wooden sticks, cloth and cardboard boxes.

Isaac Munyae of IOM Somalia said that most displaced people in Bosaso are from different parts of south central Somalia and tend to cluster together based on their clans.

A rapid assessment after the fire identified urgent needs including shelter, food, water, non-food relief items, protection for under-age children, and protection for women and girls from gender-based violence (GBV).

IOM helped the local authorities to provide water trucking, shelter, water, hygiene and sanitation kits, and other non-food relief items for the affected families.

IOM’s emergency assistance in Bosaso is supported through its mixed migration programme, which is funded by the US State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM).

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM has delivered emergency aid to more than 100 people burned out of their homes when fire raged through a displacement camp in the town of Bosaso in the Puntland area of Somalia.

A blaze, possibly started by a cooking fire, broke out on August 16th at the 55 Bush settlement in Bosaso, which lies in the Bari region of northeast Somalia.

IOM worked with local authorities and partner agencies to provide emergency aid to more than 100 people whose makeshift shelters were destroyed. The traditional shelters are called “buuls” and are made of wooden sticks, cloth and cardboard boxes.

Isaac Munyae of IOM Somalia said that most displaced people in Bosaso are from different parts of south central Somalia and tend to cluster together based on their clans.

A rapid assessment after the fire identified urgent needs including shelter, food, water, non-food relief items, protection for under-age children, and protection for women and girls from gender-based violence (GBV).

IOM helped the local authorities to provide water trucking, shelter, water, hygiene and sanitation kits, and other non-food relief items for the affected families.

IOM’s emergency assistance in Bosaso is supported through its mixed migration programme, which is funded by the US State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM).

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM, in collaboration with the Government of Mozambique, will conduct a four-day training-of-trainers programme next week (9-12/9) in Maputo on improving protection assistance…

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM, in collaboration with the Government of Mozambique, will conduct a four-day training-of-trainers programme next week (9-12/9) in Maputo on improving protection assistance…

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM Angola will next week organize a three-day workshop on labour migration and development in Luanda for Angolan government officials, private sector representatives and civil society organizations.

The training is the first of a series of six organized by IOM in partnership with the Angolan Ministry of Interior to build the capacity of key government branches.

It will familiarize participants with various aspects of labour migration, including migration and development, international cooperation, regulation and administration of labour migration programmes, protection and integration of migrant workers, recruitment and diaspora engagement.

Since the signing of a peace agreement in 2002, Angola has experienced sustained economic growth which has stimulated migration within, to and from the country.

After waves of mass emigration and forced internal displacement during the intermittent 27-year civil war, the country is now experiencing complex migration flows including growing numbers of documented and undocumented economic migrants, migrants in search of international protection, former Angolan refugees returning home, victims of trafficking, and unaccompanied minors.

A “Commission for Migration Policy” has been put in place by the Ministry of Interior to develop Angola’s first migration policy to address the challenges and opportunities of these new developments.

At the request of the Ministry of Interior, IOM is providing guidance and technical support to the Commission. It will contribute expertise in areas including mapping stakeholders’ capacities and needs, capacity building through migration management workshops, surveys of best policy practices through study tours, and guidance in intra-governmental consultation between ministries.

The six workshops will take place through September and October in the Angolan capital. Subsequent topics will include mixed migration and migrant assistance, international migration law, immigration and border management, and migration and health. The project is funded by the IOM Development Fund (IDF).

Sep 052014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — IOM Libya is monitoring the growing insecurity of some 200,000 overseas migrants living and working in Tripoli, Misrata and Benghazi. They include some 7,000 individuals IOM categorizes as “vulnerable migrants” in urgent need of evacuation assistance.

Nearly 150,000 Tripoli residents made homeless by two months of ever-intensifying conflict – almost 31,000 families – have fled the city, according to the local authorities.

“The situation is difficult and evacuations are risky, but we are committed to do our utmost to help migrants living in appalling conditions in Tripoli immigration detention centers or displaced by the fighting with no food, water or sanitation,” said Othman Belbeisi, IOM Chief of Mission in Libya.

“If we don’t help those who want to return home safely, many may risk boarding unsafe boats in the hope of reaching the security of Italy,” he notes.

As Libya’s security deteriorates, IOM continues to field telephone calls from individual migrants wanting to return to their countries of origin and foreign embassies seeking help to evacuate their citizens.

In the past week IOM has received an urgent request from Pakistan’s embassy to help rescue as many as 2,000 Pakistani nationals from embattled areas of Tripoli and Benghazi and to organize their safe return to Pakistan.

According to Belbeisi, immigration detention centers in the north of the country have also either closed or migrants have been released in recent weeks due to acute shortages of supplies.

Some of the migrants are being moved to centers further south. Others feel they have little option but to join a tide of migrants including refugees, seeking to leave Libya by sea, a route that has become increasingly perilous since the latest fighting broke out.

Since Libya’s latest crisis started in mid-July, IOM has repatriated 125 migrants from Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Ethiopia and Côte d’Ivoire via Tunisia. It is presently working to arrange the evacuation of 30 Yemeni laborers seeking safe passage from Tripoli.

IOM this past Sunday successfully evacuated from Tripoli 12 women from Ethiopia and Cote d’Ivoire to Tunisia. The women were living without basic assistance – food, water, psychological support – in immigration detention centers in Libya’s capital.

Through the month of August IOM monitors say at least 6,000 Egyptian nationals have also fled Libya through the country’s borders with Egypt and Tunisia. Nonetheless, IOM estimates up to one million Egyptians remain in Libya.

Despite the difficult circumstances, IOM intends to continue evacuation operations for as long as it can.

Sky-rocketing food prices, severe power cuts, fuel shortages and difficulty in purchasing basic goods and services may limit all relief agencies’ efforts in the field, IOM’s Chief of Mission warns.

“This security situation has an impact on our capacity to deliver assistance. Our staff in Tripoli can no longer move freely, but are doing all they can to help migrants in dire need of assistance,” he says.

Sep 052014
 

JOHANNESBURG, South-Africa, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Global news agency Agence France Presse (AFP) (http://www.afp.com) has announced that it’s English news content will no longer be available via SAPA (South African Press Association) in the new year.

Logo: http://www.photos.apo-opa.com/plog-content/images/apo/logos/afp.png

Harry Lee-Rudolph, Commercial Manager for AFP southern Africa said “SAPA and AFP has had a long and mutually beneficial relationship and the decision to withdraw our news service from SAPA was not taken lightly. However, the changing media landscape in South Africa has necessitated the exploration of new commercial approaches in keeping with AFP’s growth goals for the African region”.

AFP has a clear strategy to strengthen and enhance its coverage of Africa in all mediums. “From a commercial perspective we will focus on supplying clients a comprehensive media package to address all needs in terms of content and platform” Lee-Rudolph said.

AFP has 200 bureaus across the world in 150 countries of which 18 bureaus are based in sub-Saharan Africa. AFP’s English news wire delivers some 600 dispatches a day on world and African news. It offers varied and wide-ranging coverage on international news, politics, economics, social issues, sport, culture and science.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of Agence France-Presse (AFP).

Contact: Harry Lee-Rudolph -Tel. : + (27 11) 530 9900 – Harry.LEE-RUDOLPH@afp.com

About AFP

AFP (http://www.afp.com) is a global news agency delivering fast, accurate, in-depth coverage of the events shaping our world from wars and conflicts to politics, sports, entertainment and the latest breakthroughs in health, science and technology. With 2,260 staff spread across almost every country, AFP covers the world 24 hours a day in six languages. AFP delivers the news in video, text, photos, multimedia and graphics to a wide range of customers including newspapers and magazines, radio and TV channels, web sites and portals, mobile operators, corporate clients as well as public institutions. http://www.afp.com/afpcom/en

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Sep 052014
 

NEW YORK, September 5, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The new Permanent Representative of Burundi to the United Nations, Albert Shingiro, presented his credentials to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today.

Until his appointment, Mr. Shingiro was Permanent Secretary at the Ministry for External Relations and International Cooperation of Burundi. From 2010 to 2012 he worked in the External Service focusing on security of the Presidency.

Between 2006 and 2010, Mr. Shingiro was based in the Permanent Mission of Burundi to the United Nations, serving as Second Counsellor and as Chargé d’Affaires. His responsibilities included work on the Security Council, the General Assembly and several Committees. During the period, he also served as an Expert on the First Strategic Framework of Consolidation of Peace in Burundi in 2007.

From 2002 until 2003, he was an intern with the International Association of Québécois Studies, and in 2001 he served as an Assistant and Educational Researcher at Laval University.

In 1999, he held two positions, one as Assistant Director Tropicom Communication in Benin and the other as a correspondent for the Beninese newspaper Les Tropiques.

Mr. Shingiro holds a masters in international relations from Laval University in Canada (2003) and a bachelors in legal science from the University of Benin (1998).

Born on 31 December 1970 in Buhiga Karusi, Burundi, he is married with three children.

Sep 042014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 4, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Disease outbreak news
4 September 2014
Epidemiology and surveillance
WHO has committed to provide regular situation reports that include detailed epidemiological information a…

Sep 042014
 

GENEVA, Switzerland, September 4, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — Disease outbreak news
4 September 2014
Epidemiology and surveillance
WHO has committed to provide regular situation reports that include detailed epidemiological information a…

Sep 042014
 

LONDON, United-Kingdom, September 4, 2014/African Press Organization (APO)/ — With the rainy season, Lietchuor refugee camp, which shelters some 40,000 people from South Sudan, has become a lake dotted with islands. As a result, Ethiopia’s Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) and the UNHCR have taken the decision to close the camp and they must find an appropriate site to relocate the refugees.

Heavy rains and flooding have also caused serious damage in Pagak and Pamdong transit camps, also in Ethiopia’s Gambella region, but Lietchuor camp is the worst affected. The camp is located on flat, bare ground, with “black cotton soil” on which the floodwater pools and stagnates. The newly constructed tukuls (mud huts) for the refugees are completely flooded. The road built on a strip of elevated land is the only remaining inhabitable area, and some of the refugees have set up their tents along its course. Others have left the camp, with hundreds sheltering in nearby villages with the host community or in churches.

During the most recent rainstorm on 24 August, shelters were blown down. MSF’s compound has been also flooded. Strong winds blew down the plastic sheeting covering the roof of the staff tent, forcing the team to relocate. And inside the camp, the latrines, which were hastily built, have overflowed, with some collapsing completely.

MSF medical facilities however resisted. Despite now being on an island surrounded by floodwaters, the MSF health centre as well as the MSF’s hospital which has a total of 107 beds and includes a maternity ward and intensive therapeutic feeding centre, all set up in separate tents, continue to operate.

MSF teams have raised the medical tents to 40 cm above the ground and built a drainage system around them, with the result that the beds and the patients in them remain dry.

“Before the rainy season began, we brought in 100 trucks, each carrying five cubic metres of earth, to raise the ground level of the hospital,” says Suzanne Ceresko, MSF’s logistics coordinator. “But every day, when it rains, we still have to pump the water out from around the MSF tents.” Logistics are a vital part of MSF’s work, but in cases such as this can represent a considerable cost.

Finding an appropriate alternative site for the refugees is now crucial. The site should be like Kule and Tierkidi not prone to flooding and should have trees that can provide shade during the dry season’s scorching temperatures as well as firewood to enable refugees to cook their food rations. Finally, the site must not present a security risk to the refugee population. But the Nip Nip, Dima and Pugnido potential sites identified by the authorities do not meet these criteria.

MSF is ready to provide medical care for the refugees once they are relocated to an appropriate new site. Meanwhile, MSF teams will continue to provide care in Lietchuor camp, where people still have medical needs. Most patients seen by MSF staff in Lietchuor camp are suffering from malaria and respiratory infections, but hepatitis E and jaundice are also a problem. Between late-May and late-August, 354 cases of hepatitis E and jaundice were detected. The current hygiene conditions will have a severe impact on the population’s health. However no cases of cholera have been recorded. On 23 August, MSF teams completed a cholera vaccination campaign in the camp, immunising more than 39,000 people against the disease.

Also affected by the most recent storm is MSF’s 120-bed hospital in Itang, near the camps of Tierkidi and Kule. A dyke reinforced by the MSF team to protect the hospital collapsed, and the clinic, which saw patients from both the refugee and host communities, is no longer functional. Thirty-five inpatients have been transferred to other tents, while a number of other patients have been referred to health facilities run by other partners.

Access to healthcare is essential for the refugees in the Gambella region, and solutions must be found to ensure that medical care is available in the camps for all those who need it.